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Strawberry Culture: South Atlantic and Gulf Coast Regions

Description: Revised edition. Report discussing best practices for the cultivation of strawberries in the South Atlantic and Gulf Coast regions of the United States. Topics discussed include varieties, soil preparation, mulch and fertilizers, irrigation, harvesting, and diseases and insect enemies.
Date: 1933
Creator: Darrow, George M. (George McMillan), 1889-
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Strawberry Culture: South Atlantic and Gulf Coast Regions

Description: Revised edition. Report discussing best practices for the cultivation of strawberries in the South Atlantic and Gulf Coast regions of the United States. Topics discussed include varieties, soil preparation, mulch and fertilizers, irrigation, harvesting, and diseases and insect enemies.
Date: 1948
Creator: Darrow, George M. (George McMillan), 1889-
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Strawberry Culture: South Atlantic and Gulf Coast Regions

Description: Revised edition. Report discussing best practices for the cultivation of strawberries in the South Atlantic and Gulf Coast regions of the United States. Topics discussed include varieties, soil preparation, mulch and fertilizers, irrigation, harvesting, and diseases and insect enemies.
Date: 1958
Creator: Darrow, George M. (George McMillan), 1889-
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Strawberry Culture: South Atlantic and Gulf Coast Regions

Description: Revised edition. Report discussing best practices for the cultivation of strawberries in the South Atlantic and Gulf Coast regions of the United States. Topics discussed include varieties, soil preparation, mulch and fertilizers, irrigation, harvesting, and diseases and insect enemies.
Date: 1961
Creator: Darrow, George M. (George McMillan), 1889-
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Strawberry Culture: South Atlantic and Gulf Coast Regions

Description: Revised edition. Report discussing best practices for the cultivation of strawberries in the South Atlantic and Gulf Coast regions of the United States. Topics discussed include varieties, soil preparation, mulch and fertilizers, irrigation, harvesting, and diseases and insect enemies.
Date: 1963
Creator: Darrow, George M. (George McMillan), 1889-
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Strawberry Culture: South Atlantic and Gulf Coast Regions

Description: Revised edition. Report discussing best practices for the cultivation of strawberries in the South Atlantic and Gulf Coast regions of the United States. Topics discussed include varieties, soil preparation, mulch and fertilizers, irrigation, harvesting, and diseases and insect enemies.
Date: 1966
Creator: Darrow, George M. (George McMillan), 1889-
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Home Gardening in the South

Description: Revised edition. "A well-kept vegetable is a source not only of profit to the gardener but of pleasure to the entire family. For many vegetables which deteriorate rapidly in quality after being gathered, the only practicable means of securing the best is to grow them at home. This is especially true of garden peas, sweet corn, string beans, green Lima beans, and asparagus. The land utilized for, the farm garden, if well cared for, yields much larger returns than any area of similar size planted to the usual farm crops. A half-acre garden should produce as much in money value as 2 or 3 acres in general farm crops. In most sections of the South, though vegetables can be grown in nearly every month of the year, the garden is neglected; in fact, no feature of southern agriculture is more neglected than the production of vegetables for home use. In the following pages specific instructions are given for making a garden and caring for it throughout the season." -- p. 2
Date: 1931
Creator: Thompson, H. C. (Homer Columbus), b. 1885
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Eradication of Bermuda Grass

Description: This bulletin describes Bermuda grass, a plant that is both highly valuable to pastures and also invasive in the southern United States, and gives suggestions for its control. Possible methods for eradication include the strategic use of shade, winterkilling, fallowing, hog grazing, and tilling practices.
Date: 1918
Creator: Hansen, Albert A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Southern Corn Rootworm and Farm Practices to Control It

Description: "Of all corn pests in the South one of the most serious is the larva, or young, of the 12-spotted cucumber beetle -- the so-called southern corn rootworm. True to its name, it feeds on the roots, but in young corn it also drills a small hole in the stem just above the first circle of roots, boring out the crown and killing the bud.... Progressive farming methods, as described in this bulletin, will reduce the ravages of this insect. Burn over waste places to destroy dead grass, weeds, and rubbish in which the beetles winter. If possible, avoid planting corn in fields which contained corn the year before. Enrich the soil by planting legumes so that the corn will have a better chance of recovering from rootworm injury. Protect the bobwhite. This bird destroys many beetles of the rootworm. By careful observations, extending over a period of years, find out the dates between which the rooworm does the most damage; then time your planting so that it will fall either before or after these dates, taking into consideration, of course, other important factors in crop production." -- p. 2
Date: 1918
Creator: Luginbill, Philip
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Hog Pastures for the Southern States

Description: This bulletin describes how farmers in the southern United States can cultivate pastures for hogs using forage crops. Among the crops recommended are corn, sorghum, winter grains, alfalfa, several varieties of clover and beans, cowpeas, peanuts, chufas, sweet potatoes, mangels, and rape.
Date: 1918
Creator: Carrier, Lyman & Ashbrook, F. G. (Frank Getz), 1892-
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Horse Beans

Description: This bulletin discuss the horse bean (or fava bean), which is a legume cultivated widely in many nations and holds great potential as a crop along the Pacific and Gulf Coasts of the United States.
Date: 1918
Creator: McKee, Roland
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Farm Practices That Increase Crop Yields in Kentucky and Tennessee

Description: "In the limestone and mountain districts south of the Ohio River there is much land that has been run down by continual cropping without rotation. In some places run-down land is left to grow up in weeds, wild grasses, and brush, a practice known as 'resting' the land. Where this sort of farm management is followed farm manure is largely wasted, little or no attention is paid to green-manure crops or other means of putting humus into the soil, and crop yields are very low. However, progressive farmers throughout the region who have built up run-down lands are now getting heavy yields. In the following pages are described some of the methods by which these farmers get results by making good use of farm manure and crop refuse, using legumes and grasses in regular rotations, and applying lime and commercial fertilizers." -- p. 2
Date: 1918
Creator: Arnold, J. H. (Jacob Hiram), 1864-1921
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Farm Practices That Increase Crop Yields: The Gulf Coast Region

Description: "Gulf Coast region upland soils are ordinarily deficient in nitrogen and need to be supplied with liberal quantities of organic matter if profitable crop yields are to be produced. This condition is most easily and cheaply remedied by growing such legumes as velvet beans, cowpeas, soy beans, bur clover, crimson clover, hairy vetch, and beggar weed, and by carefully utilizing all farm manures, crop residues, and other sources of humus. By a simple readjustment most of the cropping systems followed in this region may be made to include one or more legumes which will increase the supply of nitrogen and humus in the soil and greatly increase crop yields. Systems by means of which crop yields are being increased in the region are discussed in the following pages." -- p. 2
Date: 1918
Creator: Crosby, M. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Rough-Headed Corn Stalk-Beetle in the Southern States and Its Control

Description: "Within recent years an increasing number of reports of serious damage to the corn crop by a robust black beetle have been received from most of the Southern States. A noteworthy outbreak occurred during the early summer of 1914 in the tidewater section of Virginia. As very little was known regarding the natural history of this pest, this bulletin has been designed to supply this information. By following the control measures recommended herein it is hoped that the ravages of this pest may be largely overcome in the future." -- p. 3
Date: 1917
Creator: Phillips, W. J. (William Jeter), 1879-1972
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Wheat Growing in the Southeastern States

Description: This bulletin discusses best practices for growing wheat in the southeastern United States, which has loamy soils containing sand, silt, and clay that are well-suited to wheat production, although it is necessary to use fertilizers and a system of crop rotation. Soft red winter wheats are generally the hardiest variety in this region. Topics discussed include costs, crop production yields, seeding, varieties, and common pests.
Date: 1917
Creator: Leighty, C. E. (Clyde Evert), b. 1882
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Rye Growing in the Southeastern States

Description: "Rye should be grown much more widely than at present in many parts of the Southeastern Stats. In any consideration of the expansion of the acreage of bread grain and in any encouragement given for the production of home-grown bread in this section it is necessary to consider wheat and rye together. This is because rye can be sown safely on many fields with less risk than wheat. Further, rye can be used as a substitute for wheat as a bread grain by those who are accustomed to it. Rye succeeds on poorer and sandier soils and with less fertilizer than wheat. For these reasons it should be sown in preference to wheat where it has been proved a safer crop. Rye is also the best grain in most of this section for use as a cover, green manure, and grazing dcrop. Home-grown seed is best. Northern-grown rye is not suitable for sowing in the South." -- p. 2
Date: 1917
Creator: Leighty, C. E. (Clyde Evert), b. 1882
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Ways of Making Southern Mountain Farms More Productive

Description: "The southern mountain farm often produces no more than a scant living for the family. Corn is the chief crop grown. Often part of the farm lies idle, being 'rested' while corn is grown on another part year after year until the land is worn out. By growing three or more crops in rotation, including clover, the farmer will be able to produce larger crops, make more money, and keep all crop land under cultivation all the time. Cattle, hogs, and sheep will not only add to the cash income, but will help to increase the fertility of the soil, and render larger crops possible. This bulletin describes crop rotations for small mountain farms in the southern Alleghenies, and gives complete directions for starting a crop rotation that will make poor mountain land more productive." -- p. 2
Date: 1918
Creator: Arnold, J. H. (Jacob Hiram), 1864-1921
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Fig Growing in the South Atlantic and Gulf States

Description: "This bulletin describes the varieties of figs most suitable for the South Atlantic and Gulf States, tells how to grow them and protect them from diseases and insects, and suggests methods of making them into desirable products for the table." -- p. 2
Date: 1919
Creator: Gould, H. P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Fig Growing in the South Atlantic and Gulf States

Description: "This bulletin tells about growing figs in the South Atlantic and Gulf States and protecting the figs from diseases and insects; it discusses the varieties commonly grown, and suggests methods of making the fruit into desirable products for the table." -- p. ii
Date: 1935
Creator: Gould, H. P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Handling and Loading Southern New Potatoes

Description: This bulletin discusses methods for handling, loading, and transporting southern new potatoes in the United States. It explains the importance of grading potatoes, removing bruised and diseased potatoes from the crop before transport, and loading cars properly. Potatoes may be loaded into cars in barrels, sacks, and crates, but hampers should not be used.
Date: 1919
Creator: Grimes, A. M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Handling and Loading Southern New Potatoes

Description: Revised edition. This bulletin discusses methods for handling, loading, and transporting southern new potatoes in the United States. It explains the importance of grading potatoes, removing bruised and diseased potatoes from the crop before transport, and loading cars properly. Potatoes may be loaded into cars in barrels, sacks, and crates, but hampers should not be used.
Date: 1927
Creator: Grimes, A. M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Soil Defense in the Piedmont

Description: "This bulletin deals with erosion of the soil and measures of defense which have proved successful in controlling erosion in that part of the Piedmont country lying in the five States of Virginia, the Carolinas, Georgia, and Alabama. The region is the rolling foothill country of the Appalachian Range, and extends east and south to the fall line which separates the Piedmont from the broad, gently sloping Atlantic and Gulf Coastsal Plains." -- p. ii. Measures of soil defense considered include terracing, contour tillage, strip cropping, close-growing crops in the rotation, and contour furrowing in pastures.
Date: 1937
Creator: Rowalt, E. M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department