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Eradication of Bermuda Grass

Description: This bulletin describes Bermuda grass, a plant that is both highly valuable to pastures and also invasive in the southern United States, and gives suggestions for its control. Possible methods for eradication include the strategic use of shade, winterkilling, fallowing, hog grazing, and tilling practices.
Date: 1918
Creator: Hansen, Albert A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Rough-Headed Corn Stalk-Beetle in the Southern States and Its Control

Description: "Within recent years an increasing number of reports of serious damage to the corn crop by a robust black beetle have been received from most of the Southern States. A noteworthy outbreak occurred during the early summer of 1914 in the tidewater section of Virginia. As very little was known regarding the natural history of this pest, this bulletin has been designed to supply this information. By following the control measures recommended herein it is hoped that the ravages of this pest may be largely overcome in the future." -- p. 3
Date: 1917
Creator: Phillips, W. J. (William Jeter), 1879-1972
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Wheat Jointworm and Its Control

Description: Revised edition. "The wheat jointworm is a very small grub which lives in stems of wheat, feeding on the juices of the plant and causing a slight swelling or distortion of the stem above the joint. The egg from which it hatches is laid in the stem by an insect resembling a small black ant with wings. This insect attacks wheat only. The injury which it causes to wheat is very distinct from that caused by the Hessian fly, yet the effects caused by these two insects are often confused by farmers." -- p. 1-2. This bulletin gives a brief outline of the life cycle and the nature of the injury to the plant by the jointworm so that any farmer may readily recognize its work and be able to apply the measures of control herein recommended.
Date: 1940
Creator: Phillips, W. J. (William Jeter), 1879-1972 & Poos, F. W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Roundheaded Apple-Tree Borer

Description: This report discusses the roundheaded apple-tree borer, an insect in the eastern and midwestern United States that, in its larval stage, destroys the bark and wood of apple trees. Several methods of control are discussed, including worming, paints and washes, and sprays.Apple-tree borers.
Date: 1915
Creator: Brooks, Fred E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Soft Red Winter Wheats

Description: "At least 66 distinct varieties of soft red winter wheat, known by nearly 400 different names, are grown commercially in the United States, and additional varieties are grown experimentally. These varieties differ widely in yield, adaptation, milling and baking value, and other characteristics. The most widely grown varieties in the United States in order of importance are Fultz, Fulcaster, Mediterranean, Poole, Red May, Red Wave, and Harvest Queen. The area of each of these varieties in 1919 varied from about 4,800,000 acres to about 1,000,000 acres." -- p. 2
Date: 1922
Creator: Leighty, C. E. (Clyde Evert), b. 1882 & Martin, John H. (John Holmes), 1893-
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Strawberry Growing in the South

Description: This report discusses strawberry cultivation in the southern United States, especially with regard to field location, soil and climate requirements, fertilizers, harvesting, varieties, and strawberry by-products
Date: 1915
Creator: Thompson, H. C. (Homer Columbus), b. 1885
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A Successful Alabama Diversification Farm

Description: "In this bulletin is given the record of a 65-acre hog farm in the black prairie region of Alabama. The method of farming described is applicable to the entire area in which corn, alfalfa, and Bermuda grass can be grown. This area includes the black lands of Texas, the river bottoms of Missouri, Arkansas, Louisiana, and Mississippi, and the alluvial soils generally in all the Southern States.... The primary object in the work of this farm was to demonstrate that hog farming is practicable in this territory, and three years' experience has led us to the conclusion that the production of alfalfa hay in this region can also be made highly profitable.... The system of farming established on the diversification farm at Uniontown, Alabama, was planned with the special view of increasing the fertility of the soil and reducing the cost of tillage by doing away with hillside ditches and adopting improved methods of cultivation." -- p. 5
Date: 1907
Creator: Crosby, M. A.; Duggar, J. F. (John Frederick), 1868- & Spillman, W. J. (William Jasper)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Experiment Station Work, [Volume] 67

Description: Bulletin issued by the U. S. Department of Agriculture compiling selected articles from the Agricultural Experiment Stations. This bulletin contains articles on: Screening Cabbage Seed Beds, Spraying Apple Orchards, New Type of Spray Nozzle, Preparation of Corn for Hogs, Experiments in Beef Production, Preparation of Choice Hams, and Factors Affecting Fat in Cream.
Date: 1912
Creator: United States. Office of Experiment Stations.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Spraying for Apple Diseases and the Codling Moth in the Ozarks

Description: Report promoting the spraying of apples with insecticides and fungicides in the Ozarks in order to prevent damage from bitter-rot, apple blotch, leaf-spot diseases, apple scab, and the codling moth. Each problem is described and a course of treatment by spraying is recommended.
Date: 1907
Creator: Quaintance, A. L. (Altus Lacy), 1870-1958
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Common Birds of Southeastern United States in Relation to Agriculture

Description: This report discusses birds commonly found in the southeastern United States with special regard to their diets and the impact these birds have on agriculture and insects in this region.
Date: 1916
Creator: Beal, F. E. L. (Foster Ellenborough Lascelles), 1840-1916; McAtee, W. L. (Waldo Lee), 1883-1962 & Kalmbach, E. R. (Edwin Richard), 1884-1972
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Common Birds of Southeastern United States in Relation to Agriculture

Description: Revised edition. This report discusses birds commonly found in the southeastern United States with special regard to their diets and the impact these birds have on agriculture and insects in this region.
Date: 1918
Creator: Beal, F. E. L. (Foster Ellenborough Lascelles), 1840-1916; McAtee, W. L. (Waldo Lee), 1883-1962 & Kalmbach, E. R. (Edwin Richard), 1884-1972
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Grasshoppers and Their Control on Sugar Beets and Truck Crops

Description: This report discusses grasshoppers, which destroy sugar beets and truck crops, and methods for controlling grasshoppers in the light of recent outbreaks in the mid-western United States, particularly in Kansas. The reproductive practices of grasshoppers and their preferred climatic conditions are given special attention.
Date: 1915
Creator: Milliken, F. B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Grain Farming in the Corn Belt with Live Stock as a Side Line

Description: "This bulletin is written to suggest to the corn-belt farmer of the Middle West -- especially the farmer whose soil has been run down by continuous grain farming -- some ways of coordinating and 'cashing in' the scientific advice offered him in hundreds of bulletins already published.... Briefly, these are the conclusions reached by our most successful corn-belt farmer and agricultural experts: To make a money-maker of a farm that has become a losing proposition through steady grain farming you must in addition to raising standard grain crops -- (1) Grow legumes, (2) Raise live stock as a side line, (3) Keep accounts of receipts and expenditures, (4) Mix horse sense with scientific agriculture, (5) Try to secure enough capital to enable you to farm right, (6) Stick to whatever policy you adopt long enough to try it out, and (7) Confer with your County Agent and make a careful study of the bulletins of the United States Department of Agriculture." -- p. 1-3.
Date: 1916
Creator: Vrooman, Carl Schurz, 1872-1966
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Sweet Clover on Corn Belt Farms

Description: "Sweet clover is now grown successfully on many farms in the corn belt, both in rotation and as a catch crop to be plowed under. It has proved excellent for hay and pasture, and is unequaled by any other legume for soil improvement. Sweet clover may be used to good advantage for silage, and on some farms, with proper management, it is a profitable seed crop. Mixed with bluegrass, it makes a pasture of nearly double the carrying capacity of bluegrass alone. The object of this bulletin is to present details of management and of the more important farm practices followed on some of the successful corn-belt farms on which sweet clover is grown as one of the principal crops of the rotation. Cropping systems are outlined for farms of different types, and special attention is called to the three essentials of success in growing the crop -- lime, inoculation, and scarified seed." -- p. 2
Date: 1919
Creator: Drake, J. A. & Rundles, J. C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Wheat Jointworm and Its Control

Description: Revised edition. "The wheat jointworm is a very small grub which lives in stems of wheat, sucking the juices of the plant and causing a swelling in the stem. The egg from which it hatches is laid in the stem by an insect resembling a small black ant with wings. This insect attacks no other kind of plant. The injury which it does to wheat is very distinct from that caused by the Hessian fly, yet the depredations of these two insects are often confused by farmers. This paper is intended, therefore, to give a brief outline of the life history and the nature of the injury to the plant by the jointworm so that any farmer may readily recognize its work and be able to apply the measures of control herein recommended." -- p. 3-4
Date: 1918
Creator: Phillips, W. J. (William Jeter), 1879-1972
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Muscadine Grapes

Description: Revised edition. "Muscadine grapes, which are native to the southeastern part of the United States, thrive in most soils of that region. They can be grown successfully in the Southeastern States, where American bunch grapes do not thrive. furthermore, they are suitable for home gardens as well as for commercial use. In fact they are perhaps the most satisfactory of all fruits for the home garden in this region. They cannot be grown, hoever, where temperatures as low as 0 °F occur habitually and may be injured at somewhat higher temperatures. Muscadine grapes are relatively uninjured by diseases and insects and produce well with a minimum of care, but they resopnd favorably to the good cultural practices recommended in this bulletin. The varieties described or listed produce fruit suitable for making unfermented juice, wine, jelly, and other culinary products and for eating fresh over a long season." -- p. ii
Date: 1947
Creator: Dearing, Charles
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Cattle-Fever Ticks and Methods of Eradication

Description: Revised edition. This bulletin discusses the cattle-fever tick and methods for controlling it. Possible methods include dipping, pasture rotation, and arsenical dips. The life history of the tick is also discussed.
Date: 1930
Creator: Ellenberger, W. P. & Chapin, Robert M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Cattle-Fever Ticks and Methods of Eradication

Description: Revised edition. This bulletin discusses the cattle-fever tick and methods for controlling it. Possible methods include dipping, pasture rotation, and arsenical dips. The life history of the tick is also discussed.
Date: 1932
Creator: Ellenberger, W. P. & Chapin, Robert M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Cattle-Fever Ticks and Methods of Eradication

Description: Revised edition. This bulletin discusses the cattle-fever tick and methods for controlling it. Possible methods include dipping, pasture rotation, and arsenical dips. The life history of the tick is also discussed and instructions for constructing a concrete vat are given.
Date: 1940
Creator: Ellenberger, W. P. & Chapin, Robert M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department