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How to Use Sorghum Grain

Description: This bulletin discusses the uses of sorghum grain, including in animal feeds, human food, and alcohol production.
Date: 1918
Creator: Ball, Carleton R. (Carleton Roy), 1873-1958 & Rothgeb, Benton E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Advice to Forest Planters in the Plains Regions

Description: "Advice about tree planting to provide a windbreak and a supply of firewood, fence posts, and wood for repairs should be especially valuable to the settler in the Plains region. This bulletin gives advice that will enable him to select the species of trees that will bring the most profitable returns without overburdening him with care. Following the description of each species of tree adapted to the region, the points to be avoided in connection with its planting are summarized in a few concise 'dont's.' Information and advice also are given regarding time for planting, methods of cultivation, pruning, etc." -- p. 2
Date: 1917
Creator: Smith, Seward Dwight, 1880-
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Growing Winter Wheat on the Great Plains

Description: "This bulletin is intended to answer the requests for information on the production of winter wheat on the Great Plains under dry-farming conditions that arise from the stimulus of a present and prospective price much higher than that under which the agriculture of the section has been developed and from the campaign for a large increase in the crop to meet the necessities of war conditions." -- p. 3. Topics discussed include wheat varieties and seeding.
Date: 1917
Creator: Chilcott, E. C. (Ellery Channing), 1859-1930 & Cole, John S. (John Selden)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Beet Leaf-Beetle and Its Control

Description: Report discussing the beet leaf-beetle, which is common in the Rocky Mountain region. Discussion include physical appearance, geographic distribution, life cycle, affected plants, and methods of control.
Date: 1921
Creator: Chittenden, F. H. (Frank Hurlbut), 1858-1929
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Durum Wheats

Description: Report discussing the different varieties of durum wheat, their various uses, and areas to which they are best adapted. Among the varieties discussed are Kubanka, Arnautka, Mindum, Buford, Acme, Monad, Marouani, Pentad, and Peliss.
Date: 1923
Creator: Clark, J. Allen (Jacob Allen), b. 1888 & Martin, John H. (John Holmes), 1893-
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Emmer and Spelt

Description: Report describing the types of wheat known as emmer and spelt, which are not widely grown in the United States and differ from other types of wheat in that most of the kernel is not removed from the chaff during threshing. The history, distribution, adaptation, varieties, culture, harvesting and threshing, and uses of both emmer and spelt are discussed.
Date: 1924
Creator: Martin, John H. (John Holmes), 1893- & Leighty, C. E. (Clyde Evert), b. 1882
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Dodder

Description: Report discussing the weed commonly known as dodder or love vine and methods for controlling it. If procedures are properly followed, eradication of the weed in the United States is possible. Topics include varieties of dodder and plants that susceptible to attack by it, its life cycle, and ways it is unintentionally introduced to farms.
Date: 1921
Creator: Hansen, A. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Loco-Weed Disease

Description: Report describing the poisonous plant locoweed, including its appearance and its effects on horses, cattle, and sheep.
Date: 1909
Creator: Marsh, C. Dwight (Charles Dwight)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Potato Culture on Irrigated Farms of the West

Description: "In the mountain valleys of Colorado are found conditions of altitude, soil, and moisture naturally favorable to the growth of the potato, with an almost entire absence of harmful freezes and bacterial enemies." -- p. 5. This bulletin explains how potatoes can be cultivated to thrive in the western United States.
Date: 1910
Creator: Grubb, E. H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Irrigation of Sugar Beets

Description: "A practical manual, giving methods pursued throughout the irrigated beet-growing sections and thereby furnishing information to new settlers in irrigated districts, as well as suggestions to beet growers as to the practices in States other than their own, should be of value in introducing the growing of beets and improving the methods of handling this important crop. As the matter now stands, each community where this industry has found favor is proceeding along lines suggested by local conditions which are more or less peculiar, and this bulletin is designed to be a compilation of the practices throughout the West, to which are added the results of experiments conducted by this Office in irrigation of sugar beets during the past four years." -- p. 9
Date: 1910
Creator: Roeding, F. W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Use of Windmills in Irrigation in the Semiarid West

Description: "Within the semiarid region there are millions of acres of rich, fertile land, now barren, some of which will be reclaimed through irrigation, but most of which can not be irrigated on account of the limited water supply, and must be farmed, if at all, without irrigation.... This land is now attracting eastern farmers who are prone to risk failure in view of the possibilities in years of favorable precipitation. There have been many deplorable failures during the recent years which could have been averted had the unfortunate settlers fortified themselves against periods of drought by irrigating small parts of their land holdings. It is realized that to accomplish this requires an outlay of capital and if this outlay is great it precludes the possibility of such procedure. With a view to helping these settlers, this Office has investigated the use of windmills as a means of pumping water for the irrigation of small areas in connection with the farming of more extensive areas without irrigation. It is the purpose of this bulletin to set forth in a simple, comprehensive way the possibilities of irrigation, using windmills only as means of power." -- p. 5
Date: 1910
Creator: Fuller, P. E. (Paul Edwin)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Sixty-Day and Kherson Oats

Description: Report discussing the results of experiments undertaken to determine the viability of early oats in different regions of the United States since early oats typically thrive only in the Corn Belt and Great Plains regions.
Date: 1910
Creator: Warburton, C. W. (Clyde William), 1879-1950
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Better Grain-Sorghum Crops

Description: "This paper presents the best-known methods of improving the grain-sorghum crops on the farms where they are grown. These methods are simple and inexpensive of time or money, and are therefore within the reach of all farmers. More attention to the bettering of the quality and yields will be repaid as fully in these crops as in other cereals." -- p. 2. Sorghum crops can be improved for drought resistance, earliness, stature, productivity, and adaptability to machine techniques.
Date: 1911
Creator: Ball, Carleton R. (Carleton Roy), 1873-1958
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Pit Silos

Description: "Pit silos are becoming common in many sections of the Great Plains region, especially in the Panhandle of Texas and in similar sections of the United States. The popularity of this type of silo is due chiefly to the remoteness of many farms in these sections from railroad points, which in many cases would make the cost of a masonry silo prohibitive, and to the fact that silos of wood often weaken rapidly under the peculiar climatic conditions prevailing in the Plains region and are destroyed by wind." -- p. 3. The report discusses factors to consider when deciding to build a pit silo and outlines plans for successfully constructing one.
Date: 1917
Creator: Metcalfe, T. Pryse & Scott, George A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Uses of Sorghum Grain

Description: This report discusses the uses of sorghum grain for human food and animal feed, including information about nutrition, digestibility, and storage and preparation. Sorghum is grown primarily in the southern Great Plains of the United States.
Date: 1915
Creator: Ball, Carleton R. (Carleton Roy), 1873-1958 & Rothgeb, Benton E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Grasshoppers and Their Control on Sugar Beets and Truck Crops

Description: This report discusses grasshoppers, which destroy sugar beets and truck crops, and methods for controlling grasshoppers in the light of recent outbreaks in the mid-western United States, particularly in Kansas. The reproductive practices of grasshoppers and their preferred climatic conditions are given special attention.
Date: 1915
Creator: Milliken, F. B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Growing Fruit for Home Use in the Great Plains Area

Description: This report gives recommendations to farmers in the Great Plains of the United States who would like to grow fruit in this region in which fruit is not commonly cultivated. Topics discussed include climate and soil requirements, pruning, irrigation, orchard pests, injury from hail, and suggested fruit varieties.
Date: 1916
Creator: Gould, H. P. & Grace, Oliver J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Strawberry Culture: Western United States

Description: "This bulletin applies to that part of the United States in which ordinary farm crops are grown largely under irrigation. It describes methods practiced in the more important commercial strawberry-growing districts in the irrigated regions of the West; it aims to aid those familiar only with local and perhaps unsatisfactory methods, as well as inexperienced prospective growers. The fundamental principles of the irrigation of strawberries are substantially the same as those which apply in the growing of other crops. Details of operation must necessarily be governed largely by the character of the crop grown. Since strawberries in the humid regions frequently suffer from drought, which causes heavy losses in the developing fruit, the information may prove suggestive to many growers in those localities who could install an irrigation system at small expense. Detailed information is also given as to soils and their preparation, different training systems, propagation, planting, culture, the leading varieties, harvesting, and shipping. Methods of using surplus strawberries for preserves and jams, for canning, and for flavoring for various purposes are given." -- p. 3
Date: 1919
Creator: Darrow, George M. (George McMillan), 1889-
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Strawberry Culture: Western United States

Description: Revised edition. "This bulletin applies to that part of the United States in which ordinary farm crops are grown largely under irrigation. It describes methods practiced in the more important commercial strawberry-growing districts in the irrigated regions of the West; it aims to aid those familiar only with local and perhaps unsatisfactory methods, as well as inexperienced prospective growers. The fundamental principles of the irrigation of strawberries are substantially the same as those which apply in the growing of other crops. Details of operation must necessarily be governed largely by the character of the crop grown. Since strawberries in the humid regions frequently suffer from drought, which causes heavy losses in the developing fruit, the information may prove suggestive to many growers in those localities who could install an irrigation system at small expense. Detailed information is also given as to soils and their preparation, different training systems, propagation, planting, culture, the leading varieties, harvesting, and shipping. Methods of using surplus strawberries for preserves and jams, for canning, and for flavoring for various purposes are given." -- p. 3
Date: 1928
Creator: Darrow, George M. (George McMillan), 1889-
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Strawberry Culture: Western United States

Description: Revised edition. "This bulletin applies both to the western portions of the United States in which ordinary farm crops are grown largely under irrigation and to western Oregon and Washington where irrigation is not essential for strawberry production but may be profitable. It describes methods practiced in the more important commercial strawberry-growing districts of the West; it aims to aid those persons familiar only with local and perhaps unsatisfactory methods, as well as inexperienced prospective growers. The fundamental principles of the irrigation of strawberries are substantially the same as those of irrigating other crops. Details must necessarily be governed largely by the character of the crop grown. Since strawberries in the humid areas frequently suffer from drought which causes heavy losses in the developing fruit, the information may prove suggestive to many growers in those areas who could install irrigation systems at small expense. This bulletin gives information on soils and their preparation, different training systems, propagation, planting, culture, the leading varieties, harvesting, shipping, and utilization." -- p. ii
Date: 1933
Creator: Darrow, George M. (George McMillan), 1889-
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Strawberry Culture: Western United States

Description: Revised edition. "This bulletin applies both to the western portions of the United States in which ordinary farm crops are grown largely under irrigation and to western Oregon and Washington where irrigation is not essential for strawberry production but may be profitable. It describes methods practiced in the more important commercial strawberry-growing districts of the West; it aims to aid those persons familiar only with local and perhaps unsatisfactory methods, as well as inexperienced prospective growers. The fundamental principles of the irrigation of strawberries are substantially the same as those of irrigating other crops. Details must necessarily be governed largely by the character of the crop grown. Because strawberries in the humid areas frequently suffer from drought, which causes heavy losses in the developing fruit, the information may prove helpful to many growers in those areas who could install irrigation systems at small expense. This bulletin gives information on soils and their preparation, different training systems, propagation, planting, culture, the leading varieties, harvesting, shipping, and utilization." -- p. ii
Date: 1941
Creator: Darrow, George M. (George McMillan), 1889- & Waldo, George F. (George Fordyce), b. 1898
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Strawberry Culture: Western United States

Description: Revised edition. "Strawberries can be grown in those parts of the western Untied States in which ordinary farm crops are irrigated as well as in western Oregon and Washington, where irrigation is not essential but may be profitable. The principles of irrigating strawberries are essentially the same as those for other crops. Because strawberries are sensitive to the alkali salts that irrigation brings to the surface, such salts must be washed out or skimmed off. The strawberry grower, after choosing a suitable site and preparing the soil carefully, should select varieties adapted to his district and needs. He should use plants that are disease-free. In California, southern Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas the plants should have undergone a rest period. Usually the growers plant during the period of greatest rainfall. By using the recommended systems of training and care before, during, and after setting of the plants and the suggested methods of decreasing diseases and insect pests, he should obtain better yields. A grower can furnish consumers a better product by using good methods of harvesting and shipment. He can prolong the fresh-fruit season only a little by the use of cold storage, but he can extend his market by growing varieties suitable for preserving, canning, and freezing." -- p. ii
Date: 1948
Creator: Darrow, George M. (George McMillan), 1889- & Waldo, George F. (George Fordyce), b. 1898
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Preventing Soil Blowing on the Southern Great Plains

Description: "Soil blowing is often a serious problem from December to May [in the Southern Great Plains], when the soil is, in many cases, bare and winds are high. This period is often referred to as the 'blow season.' The whole art of preventing and controlling soil blowing consists in keeping nonblowing materials on the surface. These may be crops, crop residues, or clods. When crops are absent, the essential feature in preventing soil blowing is the use of implements that lift clods and other nonblowing materials to the surface rather than implements that pulverize or destroy them.... Since tillage is dependent on implements, it seems of first importance to consider the implements that may be used to discuss their merits and shortcomings in relation to soil blowing.... From the general principles stated and the specific examples of implement use given, most farmers can probably decide on the correct applications for their farms." -- p. 1-3
Date: 1937
Creator: Chilcott, E. F. (Ellery Franklin), 1885-
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department