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Women in the 21st Century

Description: This poster introduces the faculty lecture series UNT Speaks Out on Women in the 21st Century. This series features Dr. Beverly Bower, professor of counseling and higher education, Dr. Cynthia Chandler, professor of counseling and higher education, and Dr. Suzanne Enck, assistant professor of communication studies.
Date: March 13, 2012
Creator: Mondragon-Becker, Antonio
Partner: UNT Libraries

Estrogen Replacement Therapy and its Association with Life Satisfaction of Women over Fifty

Description: This study analyzed the effects of estrogen replacement therapy (ERT), ethnicity, marital status, education level, maternal status and financial security on the perceived life satisfaction of women over fifty. Information was collected from 125 subjects at an independent school district. The instrument was adapted from a life satisfaction scale originally developed by B. Neugarten. Eight demographic items included ERT use, age, menopause status, marital status, educational level, ethnicity and perception of financial security. Statistical analysis consisting of one way analysis of variance, Student Newman-Keuls ad hoc procedure and multiple regression indicated an independent correlation between financial security and education level to life satisfaction scores. Neither ERT nor menopause status was correlated with perceived life satisfaction score of respondents.
Date: August 1991
Creator: Papich, Sandra G. (Sandra Gene)
Partner: UNT Libraries

Longitudinal trajectories of physical activity in women using latent class growth analysis: The WIN Study

Description: This article discusses a study to examine the longitudinal trajectories in objectively measured physical activity (PA), to identify unknown (i.e., latent) subgroups with distinct trajectories, and to examine the correlates of latent subgroups among community dwelling women.
Date: April 21, 2015
Creator: Kim, Youngdeok; Kang, Minsoo; Tacón, Anna M. & Morrow, James R.
Partner: UNT College of Education

Women's Health: NIH Has Increased Its Efforts to Include Women in Research

Description: A letter report issued by the General Accounting Office with an abstract that begins "Pursuant to a congressional request, GAO provided information on the National Institutes of Health's (NIH) efforts to include women in clinical research, focusing on: (1) the extent to which women are being included in clinical research that NIH funds; (2) the activities and accomplishments of the NIH Office of Research on Women's Health (ORWH) in promoting women's health research at NIH; and (3) how much funding NIH has allocated to research on health issues that affect women."
Date: May 2, 2000
Creator: United States. General Accounting Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Women's Health: Women Sufficiently Represented in New Drug Testing, but FDA Oversight Needs Improvement

Description: A letter report issued by the General Accounting Office with an abstract that begins "This report reviews the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) inclusion of women in clinical drug trials. GAO found that women were a majority of the clinical trial participants in the new drug applications (NDA) it examined and that every NDA included enough women in the pivotal studies to be able to statistically demonstrate that the drug is effective in women. Although these findings are welcome, GAO also found three areas of concern. The first is the relatively small proportion of women in early small-scale safety studies. These early studies provide important information on drugs' toxicity and safe dosing levels for later stages of clinical development, and many of the NDAs GAO examined found significant sex differences in a drug's pharmacokinetics, or how it is absorbed, distributed, metabolized, excreted, and concentrated in the bloodstream. Second, GAO is not confident that either NDA sponsors or FDA's reviewers took full advantage of the available data to learn more about the effects of the drug in women and to explore potential sex differences in dosing. This is because NDA summary documents are not required to include analyses of sex differences, and many of them do not. Third, FDA lacks appropriate management systems to monitor how many women are in clinical trials, to be certain that NDAs and investigational new drug applications (IND) annual reports comply with regulations for presenting outcome data by sex and tabulating the number of women included in ongoing trials, and to confirm that its medical officers have adequately addressed sex-related issues in their reviews. Although FDA has taken some promising initial steps to address these deficiencies, it is important that the agency finalize the pilot programs it has underway and give sustained attention to these management ...
Date: July 6, 2001
Creator: United States. General Accounting Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

[Women's health fair]

Description: This article consists of the captions for four photographs at a health fair organized by the non-profit Sister to Sister. Both the original Spanish article and the English translation are included.
Date: February 17, 2006
Creator: Castillo, José L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

Biopsychosocial Factors Related to Health among Older Women

Description: Older adults are more vulnerable to the ill effects of life stress due to physiological changes associated with aging that result in decreased immunocompetence. Stressors interacting with an aging immune system may produce further declines in health. Variables shown to modulate the effect of stressors on neuroendocrine and immune function and health include social support, personality, coping style, and health locus of control. A comprehensive model is proposed that includes: life stressors, social resources, psychological resources, interaction between stressors and social resources, neuroendocrine and immune function, and symptomatology. This model was evaluated using structured equation modeling. Participants were 97 active, community dwelling, older women, ranging in age from 60 to 93 years.
Date: August 1995
Creator: Carter, Alice Powers
Partner: UNT Libraries

Effects of Maternal Aerobic Exercise on Selected Pregnancy Outcomes in Nulliparas

Description: This study evaluated the effects of participation in aerobic exercise on pregnancy outcomes. Pregnancy outcomes included type of delivery, length of labor, gestational age, neonatal birth weight, and maternal weight gain. The 137 nulliparas were categorized as active (N=44) or sedentary (N=93) based on self-reported aerobic exercise. Findings from this study suggest that pregnant women who were active during pregnancy were more likely to have vaginal deliveries than sedentary women. No significant differences between active and sedentary women were found in neonatal birth weight, maternal weight gain, length of labor, or gestational age.
Date: August 1997
Creator: Melgar, Dian L. (Dian Louise)
Partner: UNT Libraries

Breast Cancer Screening Behaviors of Women of Mexican Descent: A Grounded Theory Approach

Description: A culturally-based theoretical model about how cultural beliefs about cancer and breast cancer screening techniques influence the screening behaviors of women of Mexican descent was developed using grounded theory. Across levels of acculturation and socioeconomic status, 34 women (49 to 81 years old) were interviewed through focus groups. Women who hold more traditional health beliefs about causes, nature, and responsibility with regard to breast cancer are more likely to "feel healthy" and not engage in breast cancer screening. Women who hold more traditional beliefs about propriety of female and health care provider behavior are more likely to "feel indecent" and also not engage in screening. The cultural health belief model is integrated within a sociocultural and a socioeconomic context.
Date: August 1999
Creator: Borrayo, Evelinn A. (Evelinn Arbeth)
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Menopause, Hormone Therapy, and Women's Health

Description: This background paper describes what is known about the natural progression of the menopause and its effect on women’s health, hormone treatment and prescribing practices, alternative approaches, and research needs.
Date: May 1992
Creator: United States. Congress. Office of Technology Assessment.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

[Women's health]

Description: This article deals with a health fair whose target audience was Hispanic women in the city of Fort Worth. Both the original Spanish article and the English translation are included.
Date: February 3, 2006
Creator: Castillo, José L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

Breast Cancer Screening Health Behaviors in Older Women

Description: Health beliefs of 221 postmenopausal women were assessed to predict the Breast Cancer Screening Behaviors of breast self-examination (BSE) and utilization of mammography. Champion's (1991) revised Health Belief Model (HBM) instrument for BSE, which assesses the HBM constructs of Seriousness, Susceptibility, Benefits, Barriers, Confidence and Health Motivation, was utilized along with her Barriers and Benefits instrument for mammography usage. Ronis' and Harel's (1989) constructs of Severity-Late and Severity-Early were evaluated along with Cuing and demographic variables. These exogenous latent constructs were utilized in a LISREL path model to predict Breast Cancer Screening Behavior.
Date: August 1994
Creator: Hammond, Marsha V.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Grand Canyons: Authoritative Knowledge and Patient-Provider Connection

Description: In 2011, African Americans in Tarrant County, Texas experienced an infant mortality rate of 14.3 per 1,000 live births. The leading cause of infant mortality in Tarrant County is prematurity and maternal nutritional status. Both maternal under-nutrition and over-nutrition are known risk factors for premature birth. Improving maternal nutrition, by reducing rates of gestational diabetes and preeclampsia, and by increasing consumption of essential prenatal vitamins and nutrients, is a road to decreasing preterm birth in African Americans. This qualitative study, based on both anthropology and public health theory, of the nutrition behavior of a group of African American expectant mothers and the experience of their health care providers and co-facilitators had a goal to provide a foundation for future development of nutrition behavior research and education for this specific population. The main finding of this study was the substantial gap of lived experience and education between the patients and their providers and co-facilitators, which hinders delivery of care and the patients’ acquiescence to nutrition recommendations. The discrepancies between the authoritative knowledge of the providers and the bodily knowledge of expectant mothers were responsible for the ineffectiveness of nutrition recommendations.
Date: May 2015
Creator: Fowler, Rebecca
Partner: UNT Libraries

[News Clip: Zomax]

Description: Video footage from the KXAS-TV/NBC station in Fort Worth, Texas, to accompany a news story. This story aired at 10:00 P. M.
Date: September 27, 1982
Creator: KXAS-TV (Television station : Fort Worth, Tex.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[News Clip: Birth control]

Description: Video footage from the KXAS-TV/NBC station in Fort Worth, Texas, to accompany a news story. This story aired at 6 P.M.
Date: March 2, 1990
Creator: KXAS-TV (Television station : Fort Worth, Tex.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[News Clip: Toxic shock]

Description: Video footage from the KXAS-TV/NBC station in Fort Worth, Texas, to accompany a news story. This story aired at 10 P.M.
Date: November 30, 1982
Creator: KXAS-TV (Television station : Fort Worth, Tex.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[News Clip: Demonstration]

Description: Video footage from the KXAS-TV/NBC station in Fort Worth, Texas, to accompany a news story. This story aired at 10:00 P.M.
Date: January 22, 1978
Creator: KXAS-TV (Television station : Fort Worth, Tex.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

Acculturation in African American College Women and Correlates of Eating Disorders

Description: Although eating disorders have been the focus of much research, the inclusion of minority populations has been minimal. A recent review of the literature by Dolan (1991) has found that eating disorders were most likely to be present in non-White women who were exposed to Western societies and cultures. Thus, the purpose of this study was to examine personality, physical, and cultural correlates of bulimic symptomatology in a sample of African American college women. The Bulimia Test Revised (BULIT-R) was used to assess bulimia symptoms. The African American Acculturation Scale (AAAS), the Beliefs about Attractiveness Scale Revised (BAAR factors 1 and 2), the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (SES), the Centers for Epidemiological Depression Scale (CES-D), Body Parts Satisfaction Scale (BPSS), and body mass were the independent variables hypothesized to predict bulimic symptoms. Hierarchical regression analysis revealed that body mass, depression, and low self-esteem were the best predictors of bulimic symptomatology, together accounting for 38% of the variance. Beliefs about attractiveness and body satisfaction were related to bulimic symptoms but not when considered simultaneously with the other variables. Acculturation was not predictive of bulimic symptoms. 0-ordered correlations revealed that beliefs about attractiveness and body satisfaction were correlated with bulimic symptoms. Acculturation was not related to any variables except depression. Implications for counseling interventions as well as directions for future research are discussed.
Date: August 1996
Creator: Lester, Regan
Partner: UNT Libraries