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Bringing real world applications for wireless sensor networks into the classroom: Telemetric monitoring of water quality in an artificial stream [2012]

Description: This report discusses research on aquatic sensors and telemetric monitoring of water quality in an artificial stream with the use of a wireless sensor networks (WSN) using the ZigBee protocol to remotely monitor an artificial aquatic ecosystem. This research is part of Research Experiences for Teachers (RET) in Sensor Education, a National Science Foundation (NSF) funded grant project.
Date: 2012
Creator: Bunn, Zac; Guerrero, Jose; Wolf, Lori; Fu, Shengli; Hoeinghaus, David; Driver, Luke et al.
Partner: UNT College of Engineering

Grid-based Coordinated Routing in Wireless Sensor Networks

Description: This paper discusses grid-based coordinated routing in wireless sensor networks and compares the energy available in the network over time for different grid sizes. The authors explore the quality of service of wireless sensor networks, how the coordinator nodes are elected, and the size of the grid area that will minimize the total energy consumption and extend the lifetime of the network.
Date: January 2007
Creator: Akl, Robert G. & Sawant, Uttara
Partner: UNT College of Engineering

The Effect of Mobility on Wireless Sensor Networks

Description: Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) have gained attention in recent years with the proliferation of the micro-electro-mechanical systems, which has led to the development of smart sensors. Smart sensors has brought WSNs under the spotlight and has created numerous different areas of research such as; energy consumption, convergence, network structures, deployment methods, time delay, and communication protocols. Convergence rates associated with information propagations of the networks will be questioned in this thesis. Mobility is an expensive process in terms of the associated energy costs. In a sensor network, mobility has significant overhead in terms of closing old connections and creating new connections as mobile sensor nodes move from one location to another. Despite these drawbacks, mobility helps a sensor network reach an agreement more quickly. Adding few mobile nodes to an otherwise static network will significantly improve the network’s ability to reach consensus. This paper shows the effect of the mobility on convergence rate of the wireless sensor networks, through Eigenvalue analysis, modeling and simulation.
Date: August 2014
Creator: Hasir, Ibrahim
Partner: UNT Libraries

Non-Uniform Grid-Based Coordinated Routing in Wireless Sensor Networks

Description: Wireless sensor networks are ad hoc networks of tiny battery powered sensor nodes that can organize themselves to form self-organized networks and collect information regarding temperature, light, and pressure in an area. Though the applications of sensor networks are very promising, sensor nodes are limited in their capability due to many factors. The main limitation of these battery powered nodes is energy. Sensor networks are expected to work for long periods of time once deployed and it becomes important to conserve the battery life of the nodes to extend network lifetime. This work examines non-uniform grid-based routing protocol as an effort to minimize energy consumption in the network and extend network lifetime. The entire test area is divided into non-uniformly shaped grids. Fixed source and sink nodes with unlimited energy are placed in the network. Sensor nodes with full battery life are deployed uniformly and randomly in the field. The source node floods the network with only the coordinator node active in each grid and the other nodes sleeping. The sink node traces the same route back to the source node through the same coordinators. This process continues till a coordinator node runs out of energy, when new coordinator nodes are elected to participate in routing. Thus the network stays alive till the link between the source and sink nodes is lost, i.e., the network is partitioned. This work explores the efficiency of the non-uniform grid-based routing protocol for different node densities and the non-uniform grid structure that best extends network lifetime.
Date: August 2008
Creator: Kadiyala, Priyanka
Partner: UNT Libraries

Demand Controlled Ventilation using CO2 Sensors in a Wireless Sensor Network [Poster]

Description: Poster presented as part of the 2013 Research Experiences for Teachers (RET) in Sensor Education, a National Science Foundation (NSF) funded grant project. This poster discusses research on demand controlled ventilation using CO₂ sensors in a wireless sensor network.
Date: 2013
Creator: Parsons, David; Jordan, Georgette; Li, Xinrong; Thompson, Ruthanne & Abraham, Sherin
Partner: UNT College of Engineering

Demand Controlled Ventilation using CO₂ Sensors in a Wireless Sensor Network

Description: This report discusses research on demand controlled ventilation using CO₂ sensors in a wireless sensor network. The focus of this research project was to investigate Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) monitoring technologies, government regulations and policies, and best practices to improve IAQ. This research is part of Research Experiences for Teachers (RET) in Sensor Education, a National Science Foundation (NSF) funded grant project.
Date: 2013
Creator: Parsons, David; Jordan, Georgette; Li, Xinrong; Thompson, Ruthanne & Abraham, Sherin
Partner: UNT College of Engineering

Bringing real world applications for wireless sensor networks into the classroom: Telemetric monitoring of water quality in an artificial stream [2013: Poster]

Description: This poster discusses research on bringing real world applications for wireless sensor networks into the classroom in the context of telemetric monitoring of water quality in an artificial stream.
Date: 2013
Creator: Bunn, Zac; McEver, Mike; Seastrunk, Deliah; Fu, Shengli; Hoeinghaus, David & Gu, Yixing
Partner: UNT College of Engineering

Stream Monitoring and Control Team

Description: This presentation discusses research on multiple sensor clusters that monitor environmental health. The goal of the project was to create a series of sensor clusters, arranged into an array of nodes, that feeds key stream health data to an easily accessible database using an ad hoc wireless network.
Date: 2013
Creator: Bunn, Zac; McEver, Mike; Seastrunk, Deliah; Fu, Shengli; Hoeinghaus, David & Gu, Yixing
Partner: UNT College of Engineering

Bringing real world applications for wireless sensor networks into the classroom: Telemetric monitoring of water quality in an artificial stream [2012: Poster]

Description: This poster discusses research on bringing real world applications for wireless sensor networks into the classroom and covers the use of a wireless sensor network (WSN) using the ZigBee protocol to remotely monitor an artificial aquatic ecosystem.
Date: 2012
Creator: Bunn, Zac; Guerrero, Jose; Wolf, Lori; Fu, Shengli; Hoeinghaus, David; Driver, Luke et al.
Partner: UNT College of Engineering

Comparative Analysis and Implementation of High Data Rate Wireless Sensor Network Simulation Frameworks

Description: This thesis focuses on developing a high data rate wireless sensor network framework that could be integrated with hardware prototypes to monitor structural health of buildings. In order to better understand the wireless sensor network architecture and its consideration in structural health monitoring, a detailed literature review on wireless sensor networks has been carried out. Through research, it was found that there are numerous simulation software packages available for wireless sensor network simulation. One suitable software was selected for modelling the framework. Research showed that Matlab/Simulink was the most suitable environment, and as a result, a wireless sensor network framework was designed in Matlab/Simulink. Further, the thesis illustrates modeling of a simple accelerometer sensor, such as those used in wireless sensor networks in Matlab/Simulink using a mathematical description. Finally, the framework operation is demonstrated with 10 nodes, and data integrity is analyzed with cyclic redundancy check and transmission error rate calculations.
Date: December 2015
Creator: Laguduva Rajaram, Madhupreetha
Partner: UNT Libraries

BLE Controller Module for Wireless Sensor Networks

Description: Sensors have been an integral part of our life since a long time. Traditionally, the transmit information to a data collection center through a physical wire. However, with the introduction of Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) communication protocol, more research is being done into the field of wireless sensor networks (WSN). BLE was introduced to target low power applications. The CC2650 Launchpad designed by Texas Instruments (TI) can lead to a bulky final product. The aim was to design hardware for the CC2650 micro-controller with the aim of making it more compact for use in WSNs. A top-down approach was used wherein the available product is studied to identify the redundant and reverse engineer it to design a new product. A 2 layer printed circuit board (PCB) was designed which resulted in a 64 percent decrease in size compared to the Launchpad. Also, experiments were performed to test the proof of concept.
Date: August 2017
Creator: Vaswani, Mohit Suresh
Partner: UNT Libraries

Statistical Strategies for Efficient Signal Detection and Parameter Estimation in Wireless Sensor Networks

Description: This dissertation investigates data reduction strategies from a signal processing perspective in centralized detection and estimation applications. First, it considers a deterministic source observed by a network of sensors and develops an analytical strategy for ranking sensor transmissions based on the magnitude of their test statistics. The benefit of the proposed strategy is that the decision to transmit or not to transmit observations to the fusion center can be made at the sensor level resulting in significant savings in transmission costs. A sensor network based on target tracking application is simulated to demonstrate the benefits of the proposed strategy over the unconstrained energy approach. Second, it considers the detection of random signals in noisy measurements and evaluates the performance of eigenvalue-based signal detectors. Due to their computational simplicity, robustness and performance, these detectors have recently received a lot of attention. When the observed random signal is correlated, several researchers claim that the performance of eigenvalue-based detectors exceeds that of the classical energy detector. However, such claims fail to consider the fact that when the signal is correlated, the optimal detector is the estimator-correlator and not the energy detector. In this dissertation, through theoretical analyses and Monte Carlo simulations, eigenvalue-based detectors are shown to be suboptimal when compared to the energy detector and the estimator-correlator.
Date: December 2013
Creator: Ayeh, Eric
Partner: UNT Libraries

Anchor Nodes Placement for Effective Passive Localization

Description: Wireless sensor networks are composed of sensor nodes, which can monitor an environment and observe events of interest. These networks are applied in various fields including but not limited to environmental, industrial and habitat monitoring. In many applications, the exact location of the sensor nodes is unknown after deployment. Localization is a process used to find sensor node's positional coordinates, which is vital information. The localization is generally assisted by anchor nodes that are also sensor nodes but with known locations. Anchor nodes generally are expensive and need to be optimally placed for effective localization. Passive localization is one of the localization techniques where the sensor nodes silently listen to the global events like thunder sounds, seismic waves, lighting, etc. According to previous studies, the ideal location to place anchor nodes was on the perimeter of the sensor network. This may not be the case in passive localization, since the function of anchor nodes here is different than the anchor nodes used in other localization systems. I do extensive studies on positioning anchor nodes for effective localization. Several simulations are run in dense and sparse networks for proper positioning of anchor nodes. I show that, for effective passive localization, the optimal placement of the anchor nodes is at the center of the network in such a way that no three anchor nodes share linearity. The more the non-linearity, the better the localization. The localization for our network design proves better when I place anchor nodes at right angles.
Date: August 2010
Creator: Pasupathy, Karthikeyan
Partner: UNT Libraries

A New Wireless Sensor Node Design for Program Isolation and Power Flexibility

Description: Over-the-air programming systems for wireless sensor networks have drawbacks that stem from fundamental limitations in the hardware used in current sensor nodes. Also, advances in technology make it feasible to use capacitors as the sole energy storage mechanism for sensor nodes using energy harvesting, but most current designs require additional electronics. These two considerations led to the design of a new sensor node. A microcontroller was chosen that meets the Popek and Goldberg virtualization requirements. The hardware design for this new sensor node is presented, as well as a preliminary operating system. The prototypes are tested, and demonstrated to be sustainable with a capacitor and solar panel. The issue of capacitor leakage is considered and measured.
Date: December 2009
Creator: Skelton, Adam W.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Simulink® Based Design and Implementation of Wireless Sensor Networks

Description: A wireless sensor network (WSN) is a spatially distributed network used to monitor the physical and environmental conditions such as temperature, pressure, sound, humidity, heat, etc. WSNs can be modeled using different simulation frameworks like OMNeT++, Prowler, Atarraya, PiccSIM, Network Simulator, etc. In this research, Simulink framework was used to model WSN system. The complete WSN consisting of transmitting nodes, communication channel, and receiver nodes are built in the Simulink framework. Orthogonal frequency division multiplexing technique was used to transmit the information. The implemented wireless sensor system behavior is studied using temperature as the measurement parameter at different values of signal to noise ratio. The plots of bit error rate versus signal to noise ratio and frame error rate versus signal to noise ratio are generated in the Simulink framework. It is easy to study the effect of different physical layer parameters on the performance of wireless sensor networks by implementing WSN in the Simulink framework.
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Date: December 2017
Creator: Nune, Raju
Partner: UNT Libraries

Comparative Study of RSS-Based Collaborative Localization Methods in Wireless Sensor Networks

Description: In this thesis two collaborative localization techniques are studied: multidimensional scaling (MDS) and maximum likelihood estimator (MLE). A synthesis of a new location estimation method through a serial integration of these two techniques, such that an estimate is first obtained using MDS and then MLE is employed to fine-tune the MDS solution, was the subject of this research using various simulation and experimental studies. In the simulations, important issues including the effects of sensor node density, reference node density and different deployment strategies of reference nodes were addressed. In the experimental study, the path loss model of indoor environments is developed by determining the environment-specific parameters from the experimental measurement data. Then, the empirical path loss model is employed in the analysis and simulation study of the performance of collaborative localization techniques.
Date: December 2006
Creator: Koneru, Avanthi
Partner: UNT Libraries

Design and Implementation of Large-Scale Wireless Sensor Networks for Environmental Monitoring Applications

Description: Environmental monitoring represents a major application domain for wireless sensor networks (WSN). However, despite significant advances in recent years, there are still many challenging issues to be addressed to exploit the full potential of the emerging WSN technology. In this dissertation, we introduce the design and implementation of low-power wireless sensor networks for long-term, autonomous, and near-real-time environmental monitoring applications. We have developed an out-of-box solution consisting of a suite of software, protocols and algorithms to provide reliable data collection with extremely low power consumption. Two wireless sensor networks based on the proposed solution have been deployed in remote field stations to monitor soil moisture along with other environmental parameters. As parts of the ever-growing environmental monitoring cyberinfrastructure, these networks have been integrated into the Texas Environmental Observatory system for long-term operation. Environmental measurement and network performance results are presented to demonstrate the capability, reliability and energy-efficiency of the network.
Date: May 2010
Creator: Yang, Jue
Partner: UNT Libraries

Wireless Sensing, Monitoring and Optimization for Campus-Wide Steam Distribution

Description: The US Congress has passed legislation dictating that all government agencies establish a plan and process for improving energy efficiencies at their sites. In response to this legislation, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has recently conducted a pilot study to explore the deployment of a wireless sensor system for a real-time measurement-based energy efficiency optimization. With particular focus on the 12-mile long steam distribution network in our campus, we propose an integrated system-level approach to optimize energy delivery within the steam distribution system. Our approach leverages an integrated wireless sensor and real-time monitoring capability. We make real time state assessment on the steam trap health and steam flow estimate of the distribution system by mounting acoustic sensors on the steam pipes/traps/valves and observing measurements of these sensors with state estimators for system health. Our assessments are based on a spectral-based energy signature scheme that interprets acoustic vibration sensor data to estimate steam flow rates and assess steam traps status. Experimental results show that the energy signature scheme has the potential to identify different steam trap states and it has sufficient sensitivity to estimate flow rate. Moreover, results indicate a nearly quadratic relationship over the test region between the overall energy signature factor and flow rate in the pipe. We are able to present the steam flow and steam trap status, sensor readings, and the assessed alerts as an interactive overlay within a web-based Google Earth geographic platform that enables decision makers to take remedial action. The goal is to achieve significant energy-saving in steam lines by monitoring and acting on leaking steam pipes/traps/valves. We believe our demonstration serves as an instantiation of a platform that extends implementation to include newer modalities to manage water flow, sewage and energy consumption.
Date: November 1, 2011
Creator: Olama, Mohammed M.; Allgood, Glenn O.; Kuruganti, Phani Teja; Sukumar, Sreenivas R.; Woodworth, Ken & Lake, Joe E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department