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Field Evaluation of Low-E Storm Windows

Description: A field evaluation comparing the performance of low emittance (low-e) storm windows with both standard clear storm windows and no storm windows was performed in a cold climate. Six homes with single-pane windows were monitored over the period of one heating season. The homes were monitored with no storm windows and with new storm windows. The storm windows installed on four of the six homes included a hard coat, pyrolitic, low-e coating while the storm windows for the other two homeshad traditional clear glass. Overall heating load reduction due to the storm windows was 13percent with the clear glass and 21percent with the low-e windows. Simple paybacks for the addition of the storm windows were 10 years for the clear glass and 4.5 years forthe low-e storm windows.
Date: July 11, 2007
Creator: Drumheller, S. Craig; Kohler, Christian & Minen, Stefanie
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

[A damaged building]

Description: Photograph of a damaged building, that appears to have no roof. The top edge of the building is jagged. The numerous windows are devoid of any glass.
Date: 19XX
Creator: Williams, Byrd M. (Byrd Moore), III
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

CONSERVATION OPTIONS IN RESIDENTIAL ENERGY USE: STUDIES USING THE COMPUTER PROGRAM TWOZONE

Description: A computer model called TWOZONE, which differentiates between the thermal behavior of the north and south zones of a house, is used to study the heating and cooling loads of single-family residences. The model agrees well with the available field data and with the NBSLD (NBSFAST) computer program. In this paper we resolve the furnace output into component loads. We show that depending on the climate, there is an optimum glass area and location in the house from the viewpoint of minimizing the yearly heating bill. The effectiveness of several window management strategies is studied. The energy savings and cost effectiveness of various retrofit measures such as ceiling and wall insulation, storm windows, and clock thermostat are evaluated for two different climates.
Date: August 1, 1977
Creator: Wall, L. W.; Dey, T.; Gadgil, A. J.; Lilly, A. B. & Rosenfeld, A. H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

[Looking up at a cabin window]

Description: Photograph of the exterior of a cabin window. The window is a small rectangular shape positioned above the camera, nearby trees are seen reflected in the glass of the window panes. The wood of the cabin is weathered and the chinking is dried out and cracked.
Date: [1939..1989]
Creator: Clark, Joe
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[Top part of a building]

Description: Photograph of the top half of a building. The building has striped awnings above its windows. Three small balconies are present underneath the windows.
Date: [1940..]
Creator: Williams, Byrd M. (Byrd Moore), III
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[The front of a building in a town]

Description: Photograph of the front of a building in a town. The building is made of brick and has multiple windows with curved accents above them. The doorway to the building is open and a wooden plank rests at the bottom.
Date: [1900..1930]
Creator: Williams, Byrd Moore, Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

The Impact Of The MCU Life Extension Solvent On Sludge Batch 8 Projected Operating Windows

Description: As a part of the Actinide Removal Process (ARP)/Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) Life Extension Project, a next generation solvent (NGS) and a new strip acid will be deployed. The strip acid will be changed from dilute nitric acid to dilute boric acid (0.01 M). Because of these changes, experimental testing or evaluations with the next generation solvent are required to determine the impact of these changes (if any) to Chemical Process Cell (CPC) activities, glass formulation strategies, and melter operations at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The introduction of the dilute (0.01 M) boric acid stream into the DWPF flowsheet has a potential impact on glass formulation and frit development efforts since B203 is a major oxide in frits developed for DWPF. Prior knowledge of this stream can be accounted for during frit development efforts but that was not the case for Sludge Batch 8 (SB8). Frit 803 has already been recommended and procured for SB8 processing; altering the frit to account for the incoming boron from the strip effluent (SE) is not an option for SB8. Therefore, the operational robustness of Frit 803 to the introduction of SE including its compositional tolerances (i.e., up to 0.0125M boric acid) is of interest and was the focus of this study. The primary question to be addressed in the current study was: What is the impact (if any) on the projected operating windows for the Frit 803 - SB8 flowsheet to additions of B203 from the SE in the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT)? More specifically, will Frit 803 be robust to the potential compositional changes occurring in the SRAT due to sludge variation, varying additions of ARP and/or the introduction of SE by providing access to waste loadings (WLs) of interest to DWPF? The Measurement Acceptability …
Date: June 26, 2013
Creator: Peeler, D. K. & Edwards, T. B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Impact Of The MCU Life Extension Solvent On Sludge Batch 8 Projected Operating Windows

Description: As a part of the Actinide Removal Process (ARP)/Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) Life Extension Project, a next generation solvent (NGS) and a new strip acid will be deployed. The strip acid will be changed from dilute nitric acid to dilute boric acid (0.01 M). Because of these changes, experimental testing or evaluations with the next generation solvent are required to determine the impact of these changes (if any) to Chemical Process Cell (CPC) activities, glass formulation strategies, and melter operations at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The introduction of the dilute (0.01M) boric acid stream into the DWPF flowsheet has a potential impact on glass formulation and frit development efforts since B2O3 is a major oxide in frits developed for DWPF. Prior knowledge of this stream can be accounted for during frit development efforts but that was not the case for Sludge Batch 8 (SB8). Frit 803 has already been recommended and procured for SB8 processing; altering the frit to account for the incoming boron from the strip effluent (SE) is not an option for SB8. Therefore, the operational robustness of Frit 803 to the introduction of SE including its compositional tolerances (i.e., up to 0.0125M boric acid) is of interest and was the focus of this study. The primary question to be addressed in the current study was: What is the impact (if any) on the projected operating windows for the Frit 803 – SB8 flowsheet to additions of B2O3 from the SE in the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT)? More specifically, will Frit 803 be robust to the potential compositional changes occurring in the SRAT due to sludge variation, varying additions of ARP and/or the introduction of SE by providing access to waste loadings (WLs) of interest to DWPF? The Measurement Acceptability Region …
Date: August 14, 2013
Creator: Peeler, D. K.; Edwards, T. B. & Stone, M. E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Electrochromism in copper oxide thin films

Description: Transparent thin films of copper(I) oxide prepared on conductive SnO2:F glass substrates by anodic oxidation of sputtered copper films or by direct electrodeposition of Cu2O transformed reversibly to opaque metallic copper films when reduced in alkaline electrolyte. In addition, the same Cu2O films transform reversibly to black copper(II) oxide when cycled at more anodic potentials. Copper oxide-to-copper switching covered a large dynamic range, from 85% and 10% photopic transmittance, with a coloration efficiency of about 32 cm2/C. Gradual deterioration of the switching range occurred over 20 to 100 cycles. This is tentatively ascribed to coarsening of the film and contact degradation caused by the 65% volume change on conversion of Cu to Cu2O. Switching between the two copper oxides (which have similar volumes) was more stable and more efficient (CE = 60 cm2/C), but covered a smaller transmittance range (60% to 44% T). Due to their large electrochemical storage capacity and tolerance for alkaline electrolytes, these cathodically coloring films may be useful as counter electrodes for anodically coloring electrode films such as nickel oxide or metal hydrides.
Date: August 15, 2000
Creator: Richardson, T. J.; Slack, J. L. & Rubin, M. D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Spectral selectivity of electrochromic windows with color state for all-sky conditions

Description: The optical performance of an electrochromic window is studied for the visible, ultraviolet, and near infrared spectral regions. The performance is found to deviate strongly with window color state and for clear or cloudy skies. A new spectral cloud model is applied to an electrochromic window recently developed at NREL. A spectral comparison is made between the electrochromic window and spectrally selective standard windows. Two series of double-glazed window sections, including the electrochromic window with color state and a series of low-E windows, were measured for transmittance and reflectance (300-2500nm), With these spectral data, a new near-infrared blocking (reflection + absorption) factor is developed for window application in warm climates for cooling load reduction. A chromaticity analysis is presented for both the daylight spectra and the transmitted electrochromic window spectra with color state, Computed daylight correlated color temperatures show a wide range, with values of 5660K for clear global irradiation, 6210K for clouds, and 13,250K for a zenith blue sky. Chromatic trajectories with color state for transmitted radiation extend further toward the blue to 8180K for the global and 28,990K for zenith sky irradiation.
Date: July 1, 1995
Creator: Soule, D.E.; Zhang, J.G. & Benson, D.K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

An Experimental and Analytical Evaluation of Wall And Window Retrofit Configurations: Supporting the Residential Retrofit Best Practices Guide

Description: A Retrofit Best Practices Guide was developed to encourage homeowners to consider energy conservation issues whenever they modify their siding or windows. In support of this guide, an experimental program was implemented to measure the performance of a number of possible wall siding and window retrofit configurations. Both thermal and air-leakage measurements were made for a 2.4 x 2.4 m (8 x 8 ft) wall section with and without a 0.9 x 1.2 m (3 x 4 ft) window. The windows tested were previously well-characterized at a dedicated window test facility. A computer model was also used to provide information for the Best Practices Guide. The experimental data for walls and windows were used in conjunction with this model to estimate the total annual energy savings for several typical houses in a number of different locations.
Date: November 1, 2007
Creator: Stovall, Therese K; Petrie, Thomas; Kosny, Jan; Childs, Phillip W; Atchley, Jerald Allen & Hulvey, Kimberly D
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Measure Guideline: Energy-Efficient Window Performance and Selection

Description: This document provides guidelines for the selection of energy-efficient windows in new and existing residential construction in all US climate zones. It includes information on window products, their attributes and performance. It provides cost/benefit information on window energy savings as well as information on non-energy benefits such as thermal comfort and reduced HVAC demands. The document also provides information on energy impacts of design decisions such as window orientation, total glazing area and shading devices and conditions. Information on resources for proper window installation is included as well. This document is for builders, homeowners, designers and anyone making decisions about selecting energy efficient window. It is intended to complement other Building America information and efforts.
Date: November 1, 2012
Creator: Carmody, J. & Haglund, K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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