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Coastal Wetlands Planning, Protection, and Restoration Act (CWPPRA): Effects of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita on Implementation

Description: This report discusses the Coastal Wetlands Planning, Protection, and Restoration Act (CWPPRA), which enacted in 1990 and administered by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, has funded wetland restoration projects for more than 10 years.
Date: January 24, 2007
Creator: Zinn, Jeffrey A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Water Resources Development Act (WRDA): Corps of Engineers Project Authorization Issues

Description: WRDA is the main legislative vehicle for Corps civil works authorizations. This report considers the current status of WRDA and major issues shaping WRDA consideration in the 110th Congress, including changes to Corps project development practices and policies, coastal Louisiana wetlands restoration activities, Upper Mississippi River Illinois Waterway (UMR-IWW) investments, and Everglades restoration projects.
Date: October 4, 2007
Creator: Carter, Nicole T.; Hughes, H. S.; Sheikh, Pervaze A. & Zinn, Jeffrey A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The National Wetland Condition Assessment 2011

Description: This fact sheet gives an overview of the "first national scale evaluation of the ecological condition of U.S. wetlands," both tidal and non-tidal. It is part of a larger assessment of the nation's waters called the National Aquatic Resource Surveys. Using consistent established criteria, selected wetlands were evaluated and the results were used to determine the percent of the nation's wetlands that are in good, fair, or poor condition. General problems were identified by the assessment, and current actions to address the problems are listed.
Date: 2011
Creator: United States. Environmental Protection Agency.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Chapter 7: Management Measures for Wetlands, Riparian Areas, and Vegetated Treatment Systems

Description: This chapter contains management measures that address multiple categories of nonpoint source (NPS) pollution that affect coastal waters. These pollutants include sediment, nitrogen, phosphorus, and temperature.
Date: January 1993
Creator: United States. Environmental Protection Agency.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Coastal Louisiana: Attempting to Restore an Ecosystem

Description: Congress continues to consider legislative options to address wetlands loss in coastal Louisiana. Some legislative proposals would dedicate some federal revenues from offshore oil and gas development to restoration efforts. Other proposals would authorize specific restoration projects or activities, or further examination of the causes and effects of loss. These projects are neutralizing conditions that lead to loss at some sites, and are reestablishing some wetlands. These projects are expected to have many ecological, economic, and social benefits. A July 2004 U.S. Army Corps of Engineers report, a draft ecosystem restoration study, identifies more than 150 possible remedies.
Date: October 25, 2004
Creator: Zinn, Jeffrey A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Testing a passive revegetation approach for restoring Coastal Plain depression wetlands

Description: Abstract Restoration of coastal plain depressions, a biologically significant and threatened wetland type of the southeastern United States, has received little systematic research. Within the context of an experimental project designed to evaluate several restoration approaches, we tested whether successful revegetation can be achieved by passive methods (recruitment from seed banks or seed dispersal) that allow for wetland ‘‘self-design’’ in response to hydrologic recovery. For 16 forested depressions that historically had been drained and altered, drainage ditches were plugged to reestablish natural ponding regimes, and the successional forest was harvested to open the sites and promote establishment of emergent wetland vegetation. We sampled seed bank and vegetation composition 1 year before restoration and monitored vegetation response for 3 years after. Following forest removal and ditch plugging, the restored wetlands quickly developed a dense cover of herbaceous plant species, of which roughly half were wetland species. Seed banks were a major source of wetland species for early revegetation. However, hydrologic recovery was slowed by a prolonged drought, which allowed nonwetland plant species to establish from seed banks and dispersal or to regrow after site harvest. Some nonwetland species were later suppressed by ponded conditions in the third year, but resprouting woody plants persisted and could alter the future trajectory of revegetation. Some characteristic wetland species were largely absent in the restored sites, indicating that passive methods may not fully replicate the composition of reference systems. Passive revegetation was partially successful, but regional droughts present inherent challenges to restoring depressional wetlands whose hydrologic regimes are strongly controlled by rainfall variability.
Date: September 1, 2006
Creator: De Steven, Diane; Sharitz, Rebecca R.; Singer, Julian H. & Barton, Christopher D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Water Resources Development Act (WRDA): Army Corps of Engineers Authorization Issues in the 109th Congress

Description: The Corps is a federal agency in the Department of Defense with military and civilian responsibilities. At the direction of Congress, the Corps plans, builds, operates, and maintains a wide range of water resources facilities in U.S. states and territories.
Date: March 13, 2006
Creator: Carter, Nicole T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Coastal Louisiana Ecosystem Restoration: The Recommended Corps Plan

Description: The Corps estimates that this entire package of recommended activities would cost a total of $1,996 million. Included in this package are recommendations for immediate authorization ($1,123 million), further authorized investigation ($145 million), and projects that could be authorized in the future ($728 million). This CRS short report is limited to a summary of this Corps report and the next steps in implementation.
Date: April 11, 2005
Creator: Zinn, Jeffrey A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Hurricanes Katrina and Rita and the Coastal Louisiana Ecosystem Restoration

Description: This report introduces the Coastal Louisiana Ecosystem Restoration program, and discusses whether it might have muted the impacts of hurricanes of the magnitude and paths of Katrina or Rita and whether the devastation caused by both hurricanes might cause the Corps to consider different restoration options.
Date: November 18, 2005
Creator: Zinn, Jeffrey
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Coastal Louisiana Ecosystem Restoration After Hurricanes Katrina and Rita

Description: Prior to Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers had been seeking congressional approval for a $1.1 billion multi-year program to both construct five projects that would help to restore specified sites in the coastal wetland ecosystem in Louisiana, and to continue planning several other related projects. The state of Louisiana and several federal agencies have participated in the development of this program. This report introduces this program and restoration options that are being discussed in the wake of the hurricanes. It also discusses whether this program, if completed, might have muted the impacts of these hurricanes.
Date: March 17, 2006
Creator: Zinn, Jeffrey A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Coastal Louisiana Ecosystem Restoration After Hurricanes Katrina and Rita

Description: Prior to Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers had been seeking congressional approval for a $1.1 billion multi-year program to both construct five projects that would help to restore specified sites in the coastal wetland ecosystem in Louisiana, and to continue planning several other related projects. The state of Louisiana and several federal agencies have participated in the development of this program. This report introduces this program and restoration options that are being discussed in the wake of the hurricanes. It also discusses whether this program, if completed, might have muted the impacts of these hurricanes.
Date: May 4, 2006
Creator: Zinn, Jeffrey A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Transplanting native dominant plants to facilitate community development in restored coastal plain wetlands.

Description: Abstract: Drained depressional wetlands are typically restored by plugging ditches or breaking drainage tiles to allow recovery of natural ponding regimes, while relying on passive recolonization from seed banks and dispersal to establish emergent vegetation. However, in restored depressions of the southeastern United States Coastal Plain, certain characteristic rhizomatous graminoid species may not recolonize because they are dispersal-limited and uncommon or absent in the seed banks of disturbed sites. We tested whether selectively planting such wetland dominants could facilitate restoration by accelerating vegetative cover development and suppressing non-wetland species. In an operational-scale project in a South Carolina forested landscape, drained depressional wetlands were restored in early 2001 by completely removing woody vegetation and plugging surface ditches. After forest removal, tillers of two rhizomatous wetland grasses (Panicum hemitomon, Leersia hexandra) were transplanted into singlespecies blocks in 12 restored depressions that otherwise were revegetating passively. Presence and cover of all plant species appearing in planted plots and unplanted control plots were recorded annually. We analyzed vegetation composition after two and four years, during a severe drought (2002) and after hydrologic recovery (2004). Most grass plantings established successfully, attaining 15%–85% cover in two years. Planted plots had fewer total species and fewer wetland species compared to control plots, but differences were small. Planted plots achieved greater total vegetative cover during the drought and greater combined cover of wetland species in both years. By 2004, planted grasses appeared to reduce cover of non-wetland species in some cases, but wetter hydrologic conditions contributed more strongly to suppression of non-wetland species. Because these two grasses typically form a dominant cover matrix in herbaceous depressions, our results indicated that planting selected species could supplement passive restoration by promoting a vegetative structure closer to that of natural wetlands.
Date: December 1, 2007
Creator: De Steven, Diane & Sharitz, Rebecca R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Influence of soil physicochemical properties on hydrology and restoration response in Carolina Bay wetlands.

Description: Carolina Bays are shallow depression wetlands found in the southeast US that have been severely altered by human activity. The need to restore these complex and diverse systems is well established, but our understanding of basic wetland hydrological processes is limited, hence our ability to predict the need for and/or assess the effectiveness of bay restorations is hindered. Differing physicochemical properties of soils within bay interiors may control bay hydrology. However, previous efforts to establish relationships between soil characteristics and bay hydrology have been inconclusive and the question still remains as to why some bays are ponded throughout the year while others, within a similar landscape unit, are predominantly dry. An assessment of soil and hydrologic characteristics was initiated in restored and unrestored control bays to determine if a relationship exists. Soil morphology was described and permanent monitoring wells were installed at each site. Soil samples were collected by horizon to a depth of 2 meters at the topographic center of each site, and then analyzed. After three years, multiple regression analysis (stepwise backward and forward) was used to establish relationships between the soil physicochemical characteristics and bay hydroperiod in the undisturbed sites. Results from surface soils indicated that exchangeable acidity (EA) was the best single predictor of hydrology. The best double predictor was EA and total N and EA, total N and total C as the best triple predictor. A significant relationship (r2 = 0.96) between hydroperiod and clay content in the argillic horizon (Bt) was also observed. Subsequently, this relationship was utilized to predict hydrologic response using pre-restoration hydroperiod data. The model accurately identified sites that did not need hydrologic restoration (too wet), and effectively showed sites that responded well to restoration activities.
Date: April 1, 2006
Creator: Barton, C. D.; Andrews, D.M. & Kolka, R.K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department