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[Lonesome Weed]

Description: Photograph of a lonesome weed photographed against a clouded sky at Joe Clark's home in Farmington Hills, Michigan. Photo by: Joe Clark, HBSS
Date: 196u
Creator: Clark, Joe
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[Stone Tower]

Description: Photograph of a stone tower in Ireland. The tower connects to a wall in the foreground. Weeds grow out of the top of the wall.
Date: 1970
Creator: Gough, Ray
Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design

Dodder and its control.

Description: Describes the parasite commonly known as dodder, which attacks alfalfa and other hay-like crops; provides methods of controlling and preventing dodder infestations.
Date: July 1958
Creator: Lee, William O., 1911- & Timmons, F. L. (Francis Leonard), 1905-
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Quackgrass

Description: "Quackgrass or witchgrass is a creeping perennial grass, related to common wheat, and one of the most widely distributed and destructive weeds in the North Temperate Zone.... Quackgrass can rarely be exterminated on large areas, but it can be brought under reasonable control. The best plan is to allow it to form a sod and then plow it in midsummer during dry hot weather. Attacking the weed in wet weather or in the spring when the rootstocks are growing vigorously is almost a waste of time. After plowing, the field should be harrowed frequently until winter and the following year planted with a cultivated crop. A smother crop may follow the cultivated crop. On small areas quackgrass can be eradicated by hand digging, smothering with tar paper, spraying with chemicals, or by other means. Quackgrass makes good hay, pasturage, silage, and lawns and often can be utilized more economically than it can be destroyed." -- p. 2
Date: 1923
Creator: Kephart, L. W. (Leonard Wheeler), 1892-
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

[Winter Weeds]

Description: Photograph of Weeds growing out of the snow. In the high-contrasted image, the weeds are are the only visible part of the image to the whited-out snow.
Date: unknown
Creator: Clark, Joe
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

Use of Municipal Sewage Sludge for Improvement of Forest Sites in the Southeast

Description: In eight field experiments dried municipal sewage sludge was applied to forest sites before planting of seedlings. In all cases, tree growth was faster on sludge-amended plots than on plots that received fertilizer and lime or no amendment. In all studies, concentrations of total nitrogen in the soil were higher on sludge plots than on control or fertilizer plots, even on good forest sites. In seven of the eight studies, concentrations of phosphorus also were higher on sludge plots than on control or fertilizer plots. Nitrogen and phosphorus tended to be higher in foliage from trees growing on sludge plots. Deep subsoiling was beneficial regardless of soil amendment. Where weeds were plentiful at the outset, they became serious competitors on plots receiving sludge.
Date: September 1987
Creator: Berry, Charles R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Planting and care of lawns.

Description: Describes methods for establishing, maintaining, and protecting lawns; describes varieties of grasses recommended for planting in different regions of the United States.
Date: 1937
Creator: Westover, H. L. (Harvey Leroy) & Enlow, C. R. (Charles Ranger), b. 1893.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Wallowa Canyonlands Weed Partnership : Completion Report November 19, 2009

Description: Noxious weeds threaten fish and wildlife habitat by contributing to increased sedimentation rates, diminishing riparian structure and function, and reducing forage quality and quantity. Wallowa Resources Wallowa Canyonlands Partnership (WCP) protects the unique ecological and economic values of the Hells Canyon grasslands along lower Joseph Creek, the lower Grande Ronde and Imnaha Rivers from invasion and degradation by noxious weeds using Integrated Weed Management techniques. Objectives of this grant were to inventory and map high priority weeds, coordinate treatment of those weeds, release and monitor bio-control agents, educate the public as to the dangers of noxious weeds and how to deal with them, and restore lands to productive plant communities after treatment. With collaborative help from partners, WCP inventoried {approx} 215,000 upland acres and 52.2 miles of riparian habitat, released bio-controls at 23 sites, and educated the public through posters, weed profiles, newspaper articles, and radio advertisements. Additionally, WCP used other sources of funding to finance the treatment of 1,802 acres during the course of this grant.
Date: December 30, 2008
Creator: Porter, Mark C. & Ketchum, Sarah
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A Physiological Age-Grading System for Female Hydrellia pakistanae Deonier (Diptera: Ephydridae)

Description: Conflicting opinions about the effectiveness of H. pakistanae as a biological control agent for hydrilla prompt researchers to find a method for assessing the fly's success. Developing a physiological age-grading system for the fly using ovarian morphology to detect changes in reproductive activity is useful for evaluating reproductive status of the fly in field populations. Changes in the appearance of follicular relics in ovaries with oviposition provide a reliable method to estimate fecundity. Characteristics of follicular relics were used to develop a system with eight physiological age classes, three nulliparous and five parous. Changes that occur in the fat body were used to assist in classification of nulliparous females or those with low egg counts.
Access: This item is restricted to UNT Community Members. Login required if off-campus.
Date: December 2002
Creator: Lenz, Jennifer Marie
Partner: UNT Libraries

Weeds used in medicine.

Description: Lists and describes plants that are useful in "crude medicine" (or botanical medicine) to help the reader identify and use them.
Date: 1910
Creator: United States. Dept. of Agriculture.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Eradication of Bermuda Grass

Description: This bulletin describes Bermuda grass, a plant that is both highly valuable to pastures and also invasive in the southern United States, and gives suggestions for its control. Possible methods for eradication include the strategic use of shade, winterkilling, fallowing, hog grazing, and tilling practices.
Date: 1918
Creator: Hansen, Albert A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Wild Onion: Methods of Eradication

Description: Report discussing methods for eradicating wild onion bulbs from wheat fields. Small onion bulbs look very similar to wheat grains and the two cannot be easily separated. Wheat grain contaminated by onion bulbs has a distinct odor and flavor. Also, cows who feed on wild onions produce tainted milk. Plowing and planting practices can help eradicate the wild onion from farm lands.
Date: 1914
Creator: Cox, H. R. (Herbert Randolph)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The ecology of the principal summer weed hosts of the beet leafhopper in the San Joaquin Valley, California.

Description: Describes the results of a scientific study on the effect of summer weeds on crops (mainly sugar beets and tomatoes) and the use of the beet leafhopper to reduce their growth in the San Joaquin Valley in California.
Date: June 1943
Creator: Lawson, Francis R. (Francis Raymond), 1906- & Piemeisel, R. L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Wildland Fire Management Environmental Assessment

Description: DOE prepared an environmental assessment (EA)for wildland fire management activities on the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) (DOE/EA-1372). The EA was developed to evaluate wildland fire management options for pre-fire, fire suppression, and post fire activities. Those activities have an important role in minimizing the conversion of the native sagebrush steppe ecosystem found on the INEEL to non-native weeds. Four alternative management approaches were analyzed: Alternative 1 - maximum fire protection; Alternative 2 - balanced fire protection; Alternative 2 - balanced fire protection; Alternative 3 - protect infrastructure and personnel; and Alternative 4 - no action/traditional fire protection.
Date: April 1, 2003
Creator: Irving, John S
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

2011 Annual Ecological Survey: Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Site

Description: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Pacific Northwest Site Office (PNSO) oversees and manages the DOE contract for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), a DOE Office of Science multi-program laboratory located in Richland, Washington. PNSO is responsible for ensuring that all activities conducted on the PNNL site comply with applicable laws, policies, and DOE Orders. The DOE Pacific Northwest Site Office Cultural and Biological Resources Management Plan (DOE/PNSO 2008) addresses the requirement for annual surveys and monitoring for species of concern and to identify and map invasive species. In addition to the requirement for an annual survey, proposed project activities must be reviewed to assess any potential environmental consequences of conducting the project. The assessment process requires a thorough understanding of the resources present, the potential impacts of a proposed action to those resources, and the ultimate consequences of those actions. The PNNL site is situated on the southeastern corner of the DOE Hanford Site, located at the north end of the city of Richland in south-central Washington. The site is bordered on the east by the Columbia River, on the west by Stevens Drive, and on the north by the Hanford Site 300 Area (Figure 1). The environmental setting of the PNNL site is described in Larson and Downs (2009). There are currently two facilities on the PNNL site: the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory and the Physical Sciences Facility. This report describes the annual survey of biological resources found on the undeveloped upland portions of the PNNL site. The annual survey is comprised of a series of individual field surveys conducted on various days in late May and throughout June 2011. A brief description of the methods PNNL ecologists used to conduct the baseline surveys and a summary of the results of the surveys are ...
Date: February 27, 2012
Creator: Becker, James M. & Chamness, Michele A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

2010 Ecological Survey of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Site

Description: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Pacific Northwest Site Office (PNSO) oversees and manages the DOE contract for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), a DOE Office of Science multi-program laboratory located in Richland, Washington. PNSO is responsible for ensuring that all activities conducted on the PNNL Site comply with applicable laws, policies, and DOE orders. The DOE Pacific Northwest Site Office Cultural and Biological Resources Management Plan (DOE/PNSO 2008) addresses the requirement for annual surveys and monitoring for species of concern and to identify and map invasive species. In addition to the requirement for an annual survey, proposed project activities must be reviewed to assess any potential environmental consequences of conducting the project. The assessment process requires a thorough understanding of the resources present, the potential impacts of a proposed action to those resources, and the ultimate consequences of those actions. The PNNL Site is situated on the southeastern corner of the DOE Hanford Site, located at the north end of the city of Richland in south-central Washington. The site is bordered on the east by the Columbia River, on the west by Stevens Drive, and on the north by the Hanford Site 300 Area (Figure 1). The environmental setting of the PNNL Site is described in Larson and Downs (2009). There are currently two facilities on the PNNL Site: the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), and the recently completed Physical Sciences Facility (PSF). This report describes the results of the annual survey of the biological resources found on the undeveloped portions of the PNNL Site in 2010. A brief description of the methods PNNL ecologists used to conduct the surveys and the results of the surveys are presented. Actions taken to fully delineate noxious weed populations discovered in 2009 and efforts in 2010 to control ...
Date: February 16, 2011
Creator: Chamness, Michele A.; Perry, Christopher; Downs, Janelle L. & Powell, Sylvia D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department