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Evaluation of Adsorption and Microcoulometric Methods for Determination of Halogenated Organic Compounds in Water

Description: Two adsorption/microcoulometric methods have been investigated for total organic halogen (TOX) in water. TOX, a proposed water-quality parameter, is a rapid, surrogate method to detect halides microcoulometrically and does not require compound identification before water quality can be judged. An XAD resin is used to concentrate organic halides that are eluted by a two-step, two-solvent procedure, followed by analysis using :chromatography or pyrolysis to convert organic halides to halide. In the granular activated carbon (GAC) method, the entire GAC-organic halide sample is pyrolyzed. TOX measurements of model compounds are comparable by both methods, but GAC was found to be superior to XAD for adsorption of chlorinated humics in drinking water and chlorinated lake water.
Date: May 1980
Creator: Kinstley, Warren O. (Warren Owen)
Partner: UNT Libraries

GC/MS Analysis of Chlorinated Organic Compounds in Municipal Wastewater After Chlorination

Description: A study has been conducted for the qualitative and Quantitative analysis of chlorinated organic compounds in water. The study included the adaptation of Amberlite XAD macroreticular resin techniques for the concentration of municipal wastewater samples, followed by GC/MS analysis. A new analytical method was developed for the determination of volatile halogenated organics using liquid-liquid extraction and electron capture gas chromatography. And, a computer program was written which searches raw GC/MS computer files for halogen-containing organic compounds.
Date: August 1982
Creator: Henderson, James E. (James Edward)
Partner: UNT Libraries

Organic carbon dynamics of the Neches River and its floodplain.

Description: A large river system typically derives the majority of its biomass from production within the floodplain. The Neches River in the Big Thicket National Preserve is a large blackwater river that has an extensive forested floodplain. Organic carbon was analyzed within the floodplain waters and the river (upstream and downstream of the floodplain) to determine the amount of organic carbon from the floodplain that is contributing to the nutrient dynamics in the river. Dissolved organic carbon was significantly higher at downstream river locations during high discharge. Higher organic carbon levels in the floodplain contributed to increases in organic carbon within the Neches River downstream of the floodplain when Neches River discharges exceeded 10,000 cfs. Hurricane Rita passed through the Big Thicket National Preserve in September 2005. Dissolved organic carbon concentrations recorded after Hurricane Rita in the Neches River downstream of the floodplain were significantly higher than upstream of the floodplain. Dissolved organic carbon was twice as high after the hurricane than levels prior to the hurricane, with floodplain concentrations exceeding 50 ppm C. The increase in organic carbon was likely due to nutrients leached from leaves, which were swept from the floodplain trees prior to normal abscission in the fall. A continuum of leaf breakdown rates was observed in three common floodplain species of trees: Sapium sebiferum, Acer rubrum, and Quercus laurifolia. Leaves collected from blowdown as a result of Hurricane Rita did not break down significantly faster than leaves collected prior to abscission in the fall. Processing coefficients for leaf breakdown in a continuously wet area of the floodplain were significantly higher than processing coefficients for leaf breakdown on the floodplain floor. The forested floodplain of the Neches River is the main contributor of organic carbon. When flow is greater than 10,000 csf, the floodplain transports organic carbon directly ...
Date: December 2007
Creator: Stamatis, Allison Davis
Partner: UNT Libraries