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Designing Information Communities for the 3D Environment

Description: This abstract describes a panel presentation for the 2002 ASIS&T Annual Conference. The panel provides a summary of current research efforts in 3D imaging technologies, including how metadata fit into the panorama of building information communities.
Date: 2002
Creator: Hastings, Samantha Kelly; Rowe, Timothy; Alemneh, Daniel Gelaw; Lewis, Elise; Noot, Walter; Arroyo, Miguel Morales et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Iogene: Interface Optimization for Genealogists

Description: This is the official website for Iogene: the Interface Optimization for Genealogists Project. This project was a two-year study, funded by Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS), to identify the user interface requirements of genealogists interacting with the UNT Libraries’ Portal to Texas History. It includes information such as project reports, research questions and methods, project news, and user studies.
Date: 2013
Creator: University of North Texas. Libraries
Partner: UNT Libraries Digital Projects Unit

Information Needs of Art Museum Visitors: Real and Virtual

Description: Museums and libraries are considered large repositories of human knowledge and human culture. They have similar missions and goals in distributing accumulated knowledge to society. Current digitization projects allow both, museums and libraries to reach a broader audience, share their resources with a variety of users. While studies of information seeking behavior, retrieval systems and metadata in library science have a long history; such research studies in museum environments are at their early experimental stage. There are few studies concerning information seeking behavior and needs of virtual museum visitors, especially with the use of images in the museums' collections available on the Web. The current study identifies preferences of a variety of user groups about the information specifics on current exhibits, museum collections metadata information, and the use of multimedia. The study of information seeking behavior of users groups of museum digital collections or cultural collections allows examination and analysis of users' information needs, and the organization of cultural information, including descriptive metadata and the quantity of information that may be required. In addition, the study delineates information needs that different categories of users may have in common: teachers in high schools, students in colleges and universities, museum professionals, art historians and researchers, and the general public. This research also compares informational and educational needs of real visitors with the needs of virtual visitors. Educational needs of real visitors are based on various studies conducted and summarized by Falk and Dierking (2000), and an evaluation of the art museum websites previously conducted to support the current study.
Date: December 2004
Creator: Kravchyna, Victoria
Partner: UNT Libraries

Comparing the Usefulness of Video and Map Information In Navigation Tasks

Description: One of the fundamental aspects of robot teleoperation is the ability to successfully navigate a robot through an environment. We define successful navigation to mean that the robot minimizes collisions and arrives at the destination in a timely manner. Often video and map information is presented to a robot operator to aid in navigation tasks. This paper addresses the usefulness of map and video information in a navigation task by comparing a side-by-side (2D) representation and an integrated (3D) representation in both a simulated and a real world study. The results suggest that sometimes video is more helpful than a map and other times a map is more helpful than video. From a design perspective, an integrated representation seems to help navigation more than placing map and video side-by-side.
Date: March 1, 2006
Creator: Nielsen, Curtis W. & Goodrich, Michael A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Using Diffusion of Innovations to Explore Digital Gaming in Undergraduate Library Instruction

Description: Digital games and simulations are receiving considerable notice within the Library and Information Science (LIS) community. This study adds to the depth of knowledge in this area by providing research on the likelihood a hypothetical digital game delivery method for library instruction achieves sufficient adoption to justify its development. Furthermore, this knowledge will assist decision making processes for individuals debating the current or potential role of digital gaming at their institutions. In this mixed methods study, over 300 undergraduates were surveyed about their technology preferences, including digital gaming, for delivery of two forms of academic library instruction. The two forms of library instruction were (a) providing users with spatial information on physical library layout, and (b) educating users on information literacy topics and skills. Observational data was collected during the survey sessions, occurring at face-to-face library instruction sessions. Self-selected survey participants were also interviewed to further probe their survey responses. Rogers' Diffusion of Innovations was the theoretical foundation to this research. The primary innovation of study was the digital game delivery method. Detailed analysis of the survey-based data set included three nonparametric scaling methods: 1) rank-sum scaling; 2) circular triad analysis; and 3) multidimensional preference mapping. Content analysis of the observations and semi-structured interviews also occurred. Major outcomes were 1) the digital game delivery method achieved mediocre preference across both questions; 2) the audiovisual delivery method received the highest overall preference ranking; and 3) overall preference for the audio-only delivery method was remarkably low. The most important theme across the observational data was the participants' waning attention during the face-to-face library instruction sessions. The most important outcome from the semi-structured interviews was interviewees' stated appreciation for useful technologies. Over 95% of participants were so-called digital natives, that is, born post-1980. Rogers' assertion that age plays a minor role in predicting ...
Date: August 2009
Creator: Robertson, Michael James
Partner: UNT Libraries