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A Comparison of an Inductive and a Deductive Procedure of Teaching in a College Mathematics Course for Prospective Elementary Teachers

Description: To obtain information regarding the effects of two divergent thought processes used in a college mathematics course for prospective elementary school teachers, this study compared the effectiveness of an adaptation of the traditional, deductive teaching method with that of an inductive method reflecting the recommendations of the Committee on the Undergraduate Program in Mathematics. In the spring semester of 1973, two sections of Mathematics for Elementary Teachers I, at Cameron College, Lawton, Oklahoma, served as experimental groups to test the two adaptations. The course followed the Committee on the Undergraduate Program in Mathematics recommendations for a first course in mathematics for prospective elementary teachers.
Date: December 1973
Creator: Morris, James Kent
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

Graduate Student Opinion of Most Important Attributes in Effective Teaching

Description: Graduate students in the College of Education at the University of North Texas, Denton rated 57 teacher attributes on their relative importance in effective teaching. The data was analyzed across six demographic variables of department, sex, degree, nationality, teaching experience, and previous graduate school, using mean scores, one-way ANOVA, and t-tests for two independent samples.
Date: May 1994
Creator: Onyegam, Emmanuel I. (Emmanuel Ikechi)
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

A Comparison of Three Techniques of Teaching Literature: Silent Reading, Readers Theatre and Video-Tape Readers Theatre

Description: The problem of this study was a comparison of the responses of students to three techniques of teaching literature. From this comparison, the most effective technique of teaching literature was identified. The three techniques selected for the study were silent reading, Readers Theatre, and videotape Readers Theatre. These three techniques were compared on achievement and attitude response. Effectiveness of each technique was examined by noting each grade level and the pooled-technique effectiveness scores. Also, black and white video-tape scores were examined in comparison to scores from the presentation of color video-tape. The analysis of data revealed that Readers Theatre resulted in significantly higher mean scores on attitude-scale tests than either of the other two techniques. The teaching technique of silent reading produced significantly higher mean comprehension scores than did either Readers Theatre or black and white video-tape, although Readers Theatre resulted in higher mean comprehension scores than did black and white video-tape. Silent reading produced a higher mean score than did black and white video-tape on the attitude-scale tests. Since silent reading produced significantly higher scores on comprehension of literature, it was concluded that silent reading is the most effective method for achieving comprehension. However, it was also concluded that Readers Theatre is of importance in the domain of attitude and affect. This study isolated Readers Theatre as the most effective teaching technique for attitude response toward literature.
Date: August 1978
Creator: Roden, Sally Ann
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

A Study of Attitude Change toward Student Teaching as Expressed by Students Pursuing Certification to Teach Speech and Drama Courses

Description: The purpose of this study was to determine attitude and attitude change toward,student teaching as expressed by students who were pursuing certification to teach speech and/or drama courses in the public school at the secondary level.
Date: May 1971
Creator: Smith, Doyle D.
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

The Relationship of Personality Traits to Teacher Candidate Perceptions of Teaching Confidence and Teaching Experience in a Simulated Classroom Environment

Description: Individual personality traits of pre-service teachers may have a significant influence on their confidence in teaching. Confidence in teaching does not always align with the experience of pre-service teachers. simSchool enables transformational experiences for teacher candidates to improve in general teaching skills, connect learning theories in the classroom, and develop confidence to be an effective teacher without the ill impacts of practicing on real students. This study executed a quasi-experimental design to explore the personality traits of 152 pre-service teachers and examined how their perceptions of teaching confidence and teaching experience were related in the context of simSchool. A treatment and comparison group completed the Survey of Teaching Skills pre/post tests and the OCEAN survey for quantitative data analysis to investigate four research questions: 1. Is there a difference between treatment and comparison groups on educator’s gains in confidence and experience? 2. Is there a relationship between personality type and perceived teaching effectiveness? 3. Is there a relationship between personality attributes and pre-service educator ratings of teaching experience in a simulated teaching environment? 4. Is there a relationship between personality attributes and pre-service educator ratings of teaching confidence in a simulated teaching environment? Findings from repeated measures MANOVA tests indicated that the simSchool treatment group increased their perceptions of experience with significant gains (p < .05), in contrast to the comparison group. Two key constructs of personality and effective teaching, the latter of which is comprised of the pre-service teachers’ self-reports of teaching confidence and teaching experience, were examined using canonical correlation analysis. The traits of openness, conscientiousness, extraversion, agreeableness and neuroticism were components linked by structure coefficients to the synthetic variable of personality, the latter of which was found to be correlated with effective teaching. Pearson product-moment correlation coefficients were produced to assess the relationship between experience and confidence …
Date: May 2014
Creator: Hopper, Susan B.
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

The Development of Teaching Aids for Elementary Electricity

Description: The purpose of this study is to develop a teaching program of instructional aids which will enrich the teaching of elementary electricity in the junior and senior high schools. It is hoped that the information and materials developed and presented will be of practical value to the teachers engaged in the teaching of electricity.
Date: 1953
Creator: Briggs, Cecil Lee
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

A Comparison of Peer Nominations and Other Variables of Student Teaching Effectiveness

Description: The problem of this study was to determine how capable college students are in making choices relevant to each other's success as student teachers when compared with (a) college faculty ratings, (b) the judgments of cooperating teachers, and (c) scores from two objective self-rating scales.
Date: June 1967
Creator: Hall, Charles C.
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

An Analysis of Teaching Periodicals for Aging Education Content

Description: Ninety elementary public school teachers were surveyed to find out where they obtained their teaching ideas. Seven popular elementary-level teaching periodicals, dated 1989-1999, were analyzed for aging-related content, and compared with 27 of the National Academy for Teaching and Learning about Aging (NATLA) aspects of aging recommended for students' learning. Results indicate that public elementary teachers obtain their teaching ideas from various places: teaching institutes or workshops; other teachers; ideas or lessons they develop themselves; and teaching periodicals. A large percentage obtain lesson ideas from teaching periodicals that they browse or read. This finding may assist NATLA in making recommendations to particular editorial boards. Surprisingly, few teachers obtain their teaching ideas from state and local curricular mandates. When the periodical issues were analyzed, aging-related content was categorized in four ways: informational articles with selected teaching or learning activities; articles describing intergenerational programs or activities; book reviews with selected learning activities; and book review titles mentioning older adult characters. Category totals among the 7 periodicals were highest in book review titles mentioning older adult characters and book reviews with selected learning activities. The content was compared to NATLA's recommendations for students' learning. The findings were not significant. The aging aspect that appeared most often in book reviews with selected learning activities was that most living things have life cycles of patterned biological changes, and/or that death and disability can occur at any age. Whether we formally teach them about aging or not, children learn about it. Earlier studies indicate that even preschool children may stereotype the aging process and/or older adults. Curricular and instructional ideas provided in teaching materials, even in an informal format can provide education, which prepares children for real life experiences.
Date: May 2001
Creator: Wimsatt, T. Joy
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

Latent Transition Analysis of Pre-service Teachers' Efficacy in Mathematics and Science

Description: This study modeled changes in pre-service teacher efficacy in mathematics and science over the course of the final year of teacher preparation using latent transition analysis (LTA), a longitudinal form of analysis that builds on two modeling traditions (latent class analysis (LCA) and auto-regressive modeling). Data were collected using the STEBI-B, MTEBI-r, and the ABNTMS instruments. The findings suggest that LTA is a viable technique for use in teacher efficacy research. Teacher efficacy is modeled as a construct with two dimensions: personal teaching efficacy (PTE) and outcome expectancy (OE). Findings suggest that the mathematics and science teaching efficacy (PTE) of pre-service teachers is a multi-class phenomena. The analyses revealed a four-class model of PTE at the beginning and end of the final year of teacher training. Results indicate that when pre-service teachers transition between classes, they tend to move from a lower efficacy class into a higher efficacy class. In addition, the findings suggest that time-varying variables (attitudes and beliefs) and time-invariant variables (previous coursework, previous experiences, and teacher perceptions) are statistically significant predictors of efficacy class membership. Further, analyses suggest that the measures used to assess outcome expectancy are not suitable for LCA and LTA procedures.
Date: December 2009
Creator: Ward, Elizabeth Kennedy
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

A Comparison of a Transpersonal Psychology Technique and a Lecture-Oriented Technique of Teaching General Education Mathematics

Description: The problem of this study was a comparison of two techniques of teaching general education mathematics: a transpersonal psychology technique and a lecture-oriented technique. The purposes of the study were to determine the relative effectiveness of a transpersonal psychology technique and a lecture-oriented technique in promoting an understanding of the structure of the real number system, in the development of students' attitudes toward mathematics, and in the retention of knowledge of the real number system. The results of this study were generally inconclusive. It seems necessary that more research be done in the application of relaxation procedures and guided fantasy journeys to the teaching of mathematics before definite conclusions are drawn concerning the effectiveness of the techniques. The paper describing the experimental study consists of five chapters, five appendixes, and a general bibliography. The first chapter is introductory and presents the problem, purposes, hypotheses, and other introductory materials. The second chapter consists of a synthesis of research done in the area of man's two-hemisphere brain and a synthesis of material on the informal applications of the transpersonal teaching technique. Chapters four and five describe the collection of data and the analysis of the data. The fifth chapter presents findings, conclusions, and recommendations.
Date: December 1976
Creator: Vance, William R.
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

Secondary Social Studies Teaching Competencies as Perceived by Student-Teachers, Instructors, and Administrators in Thailand

Description: The major purpose of this study was to determine what differences exist among groups of social studies student-teachers, instructors, and administrators in eight teachers colleges in Northern Thailand regarding their perceptions of the importance of selected social studies teaching competencies.
Date: August 1990
Creator: Kamonkan Witayangkoon
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

An Analysis of the Overt Teaching of the Monitor to Students of English as a Second Language

Description: The overt teaching of the Monitor, or conscious rule awareness, to native Spanish-speaking ESL students was examined to note possible benefits to the students' oral English production. Native Spanish-speaking students of English (the experimental group) were taught an awareness of their ability to self-correct their spoken English. They were then compared to another group of native Spanish-speaking ESL students (the control group) in four areas: Ilyin Oral Interview score, total words produced, errors produced, and interference errors produced. The results of the study lend support to the theory that overt Monitor teaching could be beneficial to native Spanish-speaking students of English. The experimental group showed a significant gain in Ilyin scores and a significant reduction in the number of errors produced.
Date: August 1983
Creator: Conway, Jean (Priscilla Jean)
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

Analysis of Perceptional Differences Among Department Chairs, Faculty, and Instructors Toward the Barrier to Using Multiple Teaching Strategies in Two-Year Technical and Community College Electronics Courses

Description: The purpose of this study was to identify and analyze perceptional differences among department chairs, faculty, and instructors toward the barrier to using multiple teaching strategies in two-year technical and community college electronics courses. The literature review focused on defining multiple teaching strategies and identifying and discussing four major perceived barriers to implementing them in the electronics classroom: student, resources, classroom environmental, and teacher training/teaching technology. The targeted population consisted of 150 out of 231 electronics teaching technical and community college department chairs, faculty, and instructors throughout the state of Texas. In actuality, the targeted population's breakdown consisted of 36 full-time electronics teaching department chairs, 96 full-time electronics teaching faculty and instructors, and 18 part-time electronics teaching faculty and instructors who were actively involved in the delivery of instruction in their respective schools. Analysis of the data revealed that: (1) there are no significant differences among the perceptions of department chair people, faculty, and instructors toward the four perceived barriers to implementing multiple teaching strategies in a post-secondary electronics program; and (2) there are no significant differences in the perceptions electronics faculty members categorized by years teaching experience toward each of the four perceived barrier categories to implementing multiple teaching strategies in a post-secondary electronics program. However, further research is needed to substantiate what other barriers exist that may have an impact upon utilizing multiple teaching strategies in two-year technical and community college electronics courses.
Date: May 2004
Creator: Hutyra, Jerry Emil
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

Addressing Multicultural Issues in the Counselor Education Classroom: a Phenomenological Analysis

Description: Multicultural education in counselor education is a popular topic among counselor educators and scholars. To date, scholars have focused on understanding the experiences of counselor educators who teach dedicated multicultural courses. However, less attention has been given to other counselor educators who are required by ethical and training standards to address multicultural issues across the curriculum. The purpose of this study was to understand counselor educators’ experiences addressing multicultural issues in courses that do not have a specific multicultural or diversity focus. I used phenomenological methodology to explore the experiences of counselor educators who hold doctoral degrees in counseling or a related field, have taken a multicultural/diversity course in their graduate training, are full-time clinical or tenure-line faculty members in CACREP-accredited programs, and have never taught courses dedicated to multicultural or diversity issues. Twelve participants (six men and six women), ranging in age ranged from 31 to 65, participated in the study. Ten participants identified as White, one African-American, and one Hispanic. The research team identified eight themes: (1) reasons for avoidance, (2) constraints, (3) qualities and practices, (4) educator as a factor in student development, (5) infusion, (6) personal background, (7) awareness of biases and assumptions, and (8) counselor educator responsibility/gatekeeping. Findings from this study will add to the literature regarding infusion of multicultural issues across the curriculum. Additionally, the implications offered will serve as a resource for counselor educators as they experience unique personal and professional challenges when addressing multicultural issues in classrooms beyond the main multicultural or diversity course offered in counseling programs. Implications for this study may lead to development of more focused guidelines on how to increase the increase the comfort of counselor educators as they facilitate multicultural discussions and assist counselors-in-training in working toward cultural competence.
Date: December 2015
Creator: Wagner, Terra M.
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

National Board for Professional Teaching Standards

Description: A document for the National Board teaching standards, which details how the board was founded, with the idea to create a national certification program which recognizes the most accomplished teachers within the country in their respective content areas and grade levels. Members of the National Board believe that creating a credible way to reward and recognize teachers will benefit the profession. The National Board is looking for new testing systems to identify the accomplished.
Date: [1995..]
Creator: Far West Laboratory
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections
open access

An Evaluation of the Theory, Method, and Content of Latin in the Public Schools from 1900 to 1940

Description: The purpose of this study is to make a survey of the changes that have been made in teaching Latin from 1900 to 1940. Such a survey, it is felt, may present the matter in a more forceful light and call attention anew to some of the inherent values of Latin not found in any other subject.
Date: 1940
Creator: Spencer, Anne
Partner: UNT Libraries
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