14 Matching Results

Search Results

Advanced search parameters have been applied.

Maple Sugar and Syrup

Description: Report discussing the evolution of the maple syrup industry to its present state with special attention given to the modern manufacturing process of maple sugar and syrup.
Date: 1906
Creator: Hubbard, William F. (William Fairchild), 1876-1905
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Sorghum sirup manufacture.

Description: Describes the results of experiments conducted with the intention of increasing the production and the quality of sorghum syrup.
Date: 1908
Creator: United States. Department of Agriculture.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Food We Eat

Description: This poster introduces the faculty lecture series UNT Speaks Out on the Food We Eat. This series features Dr. James Veteto, director of the Laboratory of Environmental Anthropology, and the Southern Seed Legacy project, Dr. David Kaplan, assistant professor of philosophy and director of the Philosophy of Food Project, and Dr. Priscilla Connors, associate professor of hospitality management.
Date: October 24, 2011
Creator: Mondragon-Becker, Antonio
Partner: UNT Libraries

Sorghum Syrup Manufacture

Description: Report discussing the manufacturing process of sorghum syrup, including the different varieties of sorghum available, juice extraction, settling tanks, clarification, concentration, and canning. Also includes a consideration of economic factors.
Date: 1912
Creator: Bryan, A. Hugh (Albert Hugh), 1874-1920
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Sugar-Beet Sirup

Description: "This bulletin tells how to grow sugar beets in the garden and describes a simple process of making from them a palatable and nutritious table syrup with a pleasant flavor.... All sugar beets, if properly handled, will produce syrup. The beets are cut into thin slices and soaked in hot water to extract the sugar. The liquid is then boilded down to the thickness desired. Detailed directions are given in the following pages." -- p. 2
Date: 1917
Creator: Townsend, C. O. & Gore, H. C. (Herbert Charles), 1877-1957
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Culture of sorgo.

Description: Discusses sorgo culture and syrup manufacturing. Provides information on characteristics and varieties, diseases, and insects affecting stored sorgo.
Date: 1957
Creator: Stokes, I. E.; Dean, Jack L. & Coleman, Otto H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

An Improved Method of Making Sugar-Beet Sirup

Description: "This bulletin tells how to grow sugar beets in the garden and describes a simple process of making from them a palatable and nutritious table sirup with a pleasant flavor. A patent for the process of making the sirup has been issued for the benefit of the public, so that anyone is free to use it. Tests have proved the process to be practicable. Sugar beets may be grown in any locality which has tillable soil that is capable of producing good crops of vegetables. A small piece of ground is sufficient for planting a few rows of beets -- enough to furnish the family with sirup. The tools needed are necessary in any garden operation -- a spade, a hoe, and a rake. All mature sugar beets, if properly handled, will produce a sirup. The beets are cleaned, peeled, cut into thin slices, and soaked in hot water to extract the sugar. The liquid is then treated and boiled down to the thickness desired. Detailed directions are given in the following pages." -- p. 2
Date: 1921
Creator: Townsend, C. O. & Sherwood, S. F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Production of maple sirup and sugar.

Description: Describes the process of growing maple trees, obtaining syrup from them, and how to market the syrup.
Date: 1940
Creator: Bryan, A. Hugh (Albert Hugh), 1874-1920.; Hubbard, William F. (William Fairchild), 1876-1905. & Sherwood, Sidney F. (Sidney Forsythe), 1886-
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Experiment Station Work, [Volume] 17

Description: Bulletin issued by the U. S. Department of Agriculture compiling selected articles from the Agricultural Experiment Stations. This bulletin contains articles on: Distilled Drinking Water, Soil Inoculation, Treatment of Sandy Soils, Lime as a Fertilizer, Fertilizers for Market-Garden Crops, Pecan Culture, Weed Destruction, Maple Syrup and Sugar, Value of Cotton Seed, Alfalfa Silage, Forage Crops for Pigs, Grazing Steers, and Type of the Dairy Cow.
Date: 1901
Creator: United States. Office of Experiment Stations.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Final Technical/Scientific Report: Commodity Scale Thermostable Enzymatic Transformations

Description: The conversion of corn starch to high fructose corn-syrup sweetener is a commodity process, producing over 3 billion kg/y. In the last step of the process, an enzyme catalyst is used to convert glucose to the much sweeter sugar fructose. Due to incomplete conversion in the last step, the syrup must be purified using a chromatographic separation technique, which results in equal quantities of water being added to the syrup, and finally the water must be evaporated (up to 1 lb of water/lb of syrup). We have estimated the energy requirement in the evaporation step to be on the order of 13 billion BTU's/y. This process inefficiency could be eliminated if a thermostable form of glucose isomerase (GI), the enzyme catalyst used in the final step, was developed. Our chosen strategy was to develop an immobilized form of the enzyme in which the protein is first crystallized and then chemically cross-linked to form an insoluble particle. This so-called cross-linked enzyme crystal (CLE C(reg. sign)) technology had been shown to be a powerful method for enzyme stabilization for several other protein catalysts. In this work we have developed more than 30 CLEC preparations of glucose isomerase and tested them for activity and stability. We found these preparations to be highly active, with a 10-50 fold rate per gram of catalyst increase over existing commercial catalysts. The initial rates were also higher at higher temperatures as expected, however the efficiency of the CLEC GI preparations unexpectedly rapidly decreased to a low constant value with use at the higher temperatures. At this point, the source of this activity loss is unclear, however during this loss, the catalyst is found to form a solid mass indicating either breakage of the chemical cross-links or simple aggregation of the particles. It is likely that the increased ...
Date: August 30, 2003
Creator: Lalonde, James J. & Davison, Brian
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department