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An Analysis of the Effect of Constituent Division of Reading Texts on Students of English as a Second Language

Description: The effect of constituent division of reading texts on ESL students was examined to note possible benefits to reading comprehension. An experimental group in each of three ESL proficiency levels was tested on a reading passage divided at the ends of lines at major constituent boundaries. Within each level, the experimental group was compared to a control group in three areas: reading time, test time, and test results. Results of the study do not support the theory that constituent division of reading texts could be beneficial to ESL students. The differences in reading time, test time, and test results of the experimental group and the control group in each level were insignificant.
Date: December 1986
Creator: Childress, Anita Gaye
Partner: UNT Libraries

[Unidentified guest at TDNA conference]

Description: Photograph of an unidentified guest speaker attending the 2004 Texas Daily News Association annual conference held in Corpus Christi. The guest is seated at the table with other speakers with microphones placed in front of them.
Date: March 22, 2004
Creator: Eddie Seal Photography
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[Guest speaker at TDNA conference, 2]

Description: Photograph of an unidentified guest speaker attending the 2004 Texas Daily News Association annual conference held in Corpus Christi. The guest is seated at a table and talking into a microphone addressing the conference attendees. A diet coke is opened and poured into a glass in front of him.
Date: March 22, 2004
Creator: Eddie Seal Photography
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[Unidentified speaker at TDNA conference]

Description: Photograph of an unidentified guest speaker attending the 2004 Texas Daily News Association annual conference held in Corpus Christi. The guest is standing at a podium in the conference hall and talking into the microphone addressing the attendees.
Date: March 22, 2004
Creator: Eddie Seal Photography
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[Guest speaker at TDNA conference]

Description: Photograph of an unidentified guest speaker attending the 2004 Texas Daily News Association annual conference held in Corpus Christi. The guest is seated at a table and talking into a microphone addressing the conference attendees. A diet coke is opened and poured into a glass in front of him.
Date: March 22, 2004
Creator: Eddie Seal Photography
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[Unidentified guest speaker at TDNA conference]

Description: Photograph of an unidentified guest speaker attending the 2004 Texas Daily News Association annual conference held in Corpus Christi. The guest is standing at a podium in the conference hall and talking into the microphone addressing the attendees.
Date: March 22, 2004
Creator: Eddie Seal Photography
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[Toast to Life Speaker]

Description: Photograph of a man visible from the chest up, holding a microphone up with his right hand. He is wearing a dark suit with a red and blue tie, and has a ring on his right hand. Handwritten on the back of the photograph on a yellow sticker are the words, "Toast to Life."
Date: unknown
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

A Semantic Field Approach to Passive Vocabulary Acquisition for Advanced Second Language Learners

Description: Current ESL instructors and theorists agree that university students of ESL have a need for a large passive vocabulary. This research was undertaken to determine the effectiveness of a semantic field approach to passive vocabulary acquisition in comparison to a traditional approach. A quantitative analysis of the short-term and long-range results of each approach is presented. Future research and teaching implications are discussed. The outcome of the experimentation lends tentative support to a semantic field approach.
Date: August 1986
Creator: Quigley, June R. (June Richfield)
Partner: UNT Libraries

[Photograph of Mick Cohen]

Description: Photograph of Mick Cohen, a guest speaker attending the 2004 Texas Daily News Association annual conference held in Corpus Christi. Cohen is seen sitting behind a table and in front of a microphone as he is on a panel with other speakers.
Date: March 22, 2004
Creator: Eddie Seal Photography
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[Photograph of Lane Aten]

Description: Photograph of Lane Aten, a guest speaker attending the 2004 Texas Daily News Association annual conference held in Corpus Christi. Aten is seen sitting behind a table and in front of a microphone as he is on a panel with other speakers.
Date: March 22, 2004
Creator: Eddie Seal Photography
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[Photograph of Jack Light]

Description: Photograph of Jack Light, a guest speaker attending the 2004 Texas Daily News Association annual conference held in Corpus Christi. Light is seen sitting behind a table and in front of a microphone as he is on a panel with other speakers.
Date: March 22, 2004
Creator: Eddie Seal Photography
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

Child Centered Play Therapy (CCPT) with Latina/o Children Exhibiting School Behavior Problems: Comparative Effects of Delivery by Spanish-Speaking and English-Speaking Counselors

Description: The shortage of bilingual counselors is one barrier to young Latina/o children receiving mental health services. Child-centered play therapy (CCPT) is a developmentally responsive intervention based on the premise that play is children's natural means of communication across cultures. This randomized controlled study examined the effects of CCPT with young Spanish-speaking Latina/o children exhibiting clinical levels of school behavior problems. Participants were 57 pre-K to kindergarten Latina/o children (72% male; mean age = 4.0) randomly assigned to three treatment groups: CCPT with Spanish-speaking, bilingual counselors; CCPT with English-speaking, monolingual counselors; or active control (bilingual mentoring). Monolingual counselors participated in cultural competency training and supervision with bilingual counselors and supervisors. According to independent observers and teachers blinded to children's group assignment, both the bilingual CCPT group and the monolingual CCPT group demonstrated moderate treatment effects over bilingual mentoring, yet between-group differences were not statistically significant. Analysis of within-group change over time indicated that children in both CCPT interventions demonstrated statistically significant improvement, while the mentoring group did not. The percentage of children in each treatment group who improved from clinical to normal behavioral functioning suggests the clinical significance of the findings: 80% bilingual CCPT, 70% monolingual CCPT, 15% bilingual mentoring. Overall, findings indicate that CCPT, whether delivered by bilingual counselors or culturally-competent, monolingual counselors, is a promising intervention for young Latina/o children exhibiting behavior problems.
Date: December 2017
Creator: Barcenas Jaimez, Gustavo
Partner: UNT Libraries

Bilingualism and Aphasia: Word Retrieval Skills in a Bilingual Anomic Aphasic

Description: This study attempted to investigate the effects of aphasia on word retrieval skills in a bilingual (Spanish-English) anomic patient. Two aspects of word finding difficulties were considered. First, an attempt was made to determine whether the patient exhibited the same degree of difficulty in both languages. Second, after the presentation of three different types of facilatory cues (initial syllable, sentence completion, translated word) the correct number of correct responses per cue were analyzed to determine whether or not the same kinds of cues were equally effective in English and in Spanish. Results indicated that word retrieval was affected to essentially the same degree in both languages, with performance in Spanish only slightly better than in English. Cue effectiveness also appeared to differ across languages.
Date: May 1984
Creator: Bond, Sandra
Partner: UNT Libraries

[Photograph of Gene Haddock]

Description: Photograph of Gene Haddock, a guest speaker attending the 2004 Texas Daily News Association annual conference held in Corpus Christi. Haddock is seen sitting behind a table and in front of a microphone and holding up a newspaper as he address the crowd during the conference.
Date: March 22, 2004
Creator: Eddie Seal Photography
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

Metaphor and the ESL Classroom

Description: This paper concentrates on the viability of using metaphor as a teaching tool in the English as a Second Language classroom. In doing so, a semantically-based theory of metaphor, like that presented by Lakoff and Johnson (1980), is employed as a base for the examination. Such a theory of metaphor presents a dramatic shift from theories, especially Aristotle's, of the past. The theory of metaphor proposed by Lakoff and Johnson contends that language is essentially metaphorical and that much of our 'commonsense' knowledge about the world is derived from interpretations of reality and is manifested in metaphors central to a culture and its language. If this theory is true, then it stands to reason that a student attempting to learn English as a Second Language could profit greatly from metaphor instruction because such instruction would aid all areas of the language acquisition process.
Date: August 1985
Creator: Bishop, Ryan M. (Ryan Marion)
Partner: UNT Libraries

Teaching linguistic mimicry to improve second language pronunciation.

Description: This thesis tests the hypothesis that a whole language approach to ESL (English As A Second Language) pronunciation with emphasis on suprasegementals through the use of linguistic mimicry is more effective than a focus on segmentals in improving native speakers perceptions of accent and comprehensibility of ESL students' pronunciation of English. The thesis is organized into seven chapters. Chapter 2 is a discussion of the factors that affect the degree of foreign accent in second language acquisition. Chapter 3 gives a background on current ESL pedagogy followed by a description of the linguistic mimicry approach used in this research in Chapter 4. Chapter 5 and 6 are discussion of Materials and Methods and Conclusions and Implications.
Date: May 2003
Creator: Yates, Karen
Partner: UNT Libraries

Beliefs About Language Learning Strategy Use in an EFL Context: A Comparison Study of Monolingual Korean and Bilingual Korean-Chinese University Students.

Description: This study compared strategy use and beliefs about language learning, and the relationship between beliefs and use reported by 428 monolingual Korean and 420 bilingual Korean-Chinese university students. This study also examined the influence of background variables (e.g., gender, self-rated English proficiency, and academic major) on learners' beliefs and strategy use. Data was collected using three questionnaires, the Strategy Inventory for Language Learning (SILL), the Beliefs about Language Learning Inventory (BALLI), and the Individual Background Questionnaire (IBQ). Data were analyzed using descriptive analyses, principal-component analyses, factor analyses, Pearson r correlation analyses, multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA), and the Scheffé post-hoc test. Monolinguals reported using compensation strategies most, followed by cognitive, metacognitive, memory, social/practical practice, and affective strategies. Bilinguals preferred to use cognitive strategies most, followed by metacognitive and affective, compensation, memory, social, and independent practice strategies. Students from both groups reported low use of social and memory strategies. Despite a less favorable formal English education environment in the Korean-Chinese community and fewer English learning experiences, bilingual Korean-Chinese reported higher use of learning strategies, which indicates bilinguals' superior language learning abilities. Students from both groups had strong instrumental motivation for learning English. Bilinguals held stronger beliefs about the importance of formal learning and felt less fear of speaking English with native English speakers. Significant correlations between strategy and belief variables indicated differences in the impact of beliefs on strategy use for both groups. The result of the MANOVA revealed that bilingual humanities or engineering majors used more strategies and held stronger beliefs about formal learning. Proficiency level was positively correlated with strategy use for both groups. No gender effect on strategy use and beliefs was found. The assumption that differences in the learning experiences of the participants from two distinct geographical and socio-educational learning settings would influence the findings of this ...
Date: May 2006
Creator: Hong, Kyungsim
Partner: UNT Libraries

An Analysis of the Overt Teaching of the Monitor to Students of English as a Second Language

Description: The overt teaching of the Monitor, or conscious rule awareness, to native Spanish-speaking ESL students was examined to note possible benefits to the students' oral English production. Native Spanish-speaking students of English (the experimental group) were taught an awareness of their ability to self-correct their spoken English. They were then compared to another group of native Spanish-speaking ESL students (the control group) in four areas: Ilyin Oral Interview score, total words produced, errors produced, and interference errors produced. The results of the study lend support to the theory that overt Monitor teaching could be beneficial to native Spanish-speaking students of English. The experimental group showed a significant gain in Ilyin scores and a significant reduction in the number of errors produced.
Date: August 1983
Creator: Conway, Jean (Priscilla Jean)
Partner: UNT Libraries

Effects of Technology-Enhanced Language Learning on Second Language Composition of University-Level Intermediate Spanish Students

Description: Today's global culture makes communication through writing in a foreign language a most desirable tool to expand personal and professional relations. However, teaching writing is a complex, time-consuming endeavor in any language. Foreign language teachers at every level struggle to fit writing into an already full curriculum and need the most effective methods and tools with which to teach. Technology may provide a viable scaffold to support writing instruction for teachers and students. The purpose of this research was to determine any benefits of weekly/structured, in-class, computer-assisted grammar drill and practice on the composition quality and quantity of intermediate university Spanish learners. A related purpose was to determine whether students who participated in such practice would access a computer-based writing assistant differently during writing than students without the treatment. The research design was a nonequivalent groups pretest-posttest design. Fifty-two subjects' compositions were graded with both holistic and analytic criteria to analyze composition quality and quantity, and statistical analyses assessed interactions of treatment and effects. The computer-based Atajo writing assistant, which could be accessed during composition, had a logging feature which provided unobtrusive observation of specific databases accessed by each student. There were no statistically significant differences found between the two groups in overall composition scores or in subscale scores. Improvements across time were observed in composition performance for both the experimental and control groups. The implementation of computer-based grammar and vocabulary practice did show a small to moderate positive effect; that is to say, students who received weekly, structured computer grammar and vocabulary practice had higher scores for composition quality and quantity on the posttest measure and accessed the databases less than the control group. The consistent positive trends in the composition data results intimate that over a more extended period of time, computer-based grammar instruction might enhance the quality ...
Date: December 2004
Creator: Oxford, Raquel Malia Nitta
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Role of Motivation in Second Language Pronunciation

Description: This thesis investigates the phonological ability of exceptional second language (L2) learners of English and their levels of motivation. This study is the first of its kind to do a large-scale examination of L2 learners whose first languages (L1s) do not belong to the same Indo-European language family as English. Fifteen non-native speakers (NNSs) of English filled out a questionnaire and produced four speech samples, including a picture description task, paragraph reading task, sentence reading and word reading task. Fifteen native speaker (NS) controls also produced the same speech samples. Four NSs judged all participants' accents. Six NNSs scored as highly as NSs on some of the speech segments using a 2-standard deviation (SD) cut-off point. There was no significant correlation between their scores on pronunciation and motivation.
Date: August 2005
Creator: Wen, Tao-Chih
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Effect of Text Structure and Signaling Devices on Recall of Freshman Arab Students

Description: The problem of this study was to examine the effect of text structure and signaling devices on immediate and delayed recalls of freshman Arabic-speaking students after reading a text. Subjects for the study were forty-five freshman Arabic-speaking students enrolled in three freshman English courses at a state university. All subjects were male students. The subjects-were chosen on a voluntary basis. The subjects were given the Reading Comprehension Section of the TOEFL. They were then divided into groups of good, average, and poor readers according to their performance on the TOEFL. Two well—organized passages of expository text with clearly identifiable top-level structure of problem/solution and appropriate reading levels were selected for the study. Two versions of each passage were adapted — one with the signaling devices included in the passage and the other with the signaling devices deleted. Each subject read one version of each of the two passages. The immediate and delayed recalls of the subjects were scored by an unbiased scorer. The scorer was an expert teacher of English to foreign students. Hypothesis I stated that good readers would be able to utilize the writer's rhetorical mode of the text at a significantly higher level than average and poor readers. This hypothesis was supported. The results of Chi square analysis was significant at the .03 level for immediate recall, and at the .01 level for the delayed recall. Hypothesis II stated that readers of each of the three groups who followed the original rhetorical mode of the text would recall significantly more information than those who failed to do so. This hypothesis was also supported. The results of the Two-way Analysis of Variance were significant at the .01 level for both immediate and delayed recalls. Hypothesis III stated that the students of all three groups would recall significantly more ...
Date: May 1986
Creator: Qandil, Mahmoud Ahmed
Partner: UNT Libraries