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Insects Injurious to Deciduous Shade Trees and Their Control

Description: "Practical ways of controlling most of the injurious shade-tree insects are known. This bulletin discusses the more important insects affecting deciduous shade trees in the western two-thirds of the United States with the exception of the gispy moth and the brown-tail moth and gives the remedies for them." -- p. 2. Methods discussed include spraying with insecticides, pruning, tree banding, and fertilizers.
Date: 1921
Creator: Kotinsky, Jacob
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Care of damaged shade trees.

Description: Discusses the important role shade trees play in camouflaging property. Explains the ways in which shade trees can become damaged and provides advice for repairing them in the event of damage.
Date: May 1942
Creator: United States. Department of Agriculture.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Three insect enemies of shade trees.

Description: Describes some major pests of shade trees, the damage they cause, and methods of control. Discusses efforts to control shade-tree insects in cities and towns.
Date: 1906
Creator: United States. Department of Agriculture.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Planting and care of street trees.

Description: Describes the importance of shade trees within city limits, including: how to plan the layout of street trees; the various types of trees best suited for city growth; and how to properly maintain city-grown trees.
Date: August 1921
Creator: Mulford, Furman Lloyd, b. 1869
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Experiment Station Work, [Volume] 27

Description: Bulletin issued by the U. S. Department of Agriculture compiling selected articles from the Agricultural Experiment Stations. This bulletin contains articles on: Hen Manure; Nitrate of Soda for Field Crops; Varieties, Culture, and Quality of Wheat; Breeding Corn; Quality of Irrigated Crops; Shading Strawberries and Vegetables; Injuries to Shade Trees; Soft Corn; Hay Substitutes; Oak Leaves as Forage; the Covered Milk Pail; Canning Cheese; Millet Seed for Hogs; Fertilizers for Potatoes.
Date: 1904
Creator: United States. Office of Experiment Stations.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Energy impacts of heat island reduction strategies in the Greater Toronto Area, Canada

Description: In 2000, the Toronto Atmospheric Fund (TAF) embarked on an initiative to quantify the potential benefits of Heat Island Reduction (HIR) strategies (shade trees, reflective roofs and pavements) in reducing cooling energy use in buildings, lowering the ambient air temperature and improve air quality. This report summarizes the efforts of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) to assess the impacts of HIR measures on building cooling- and heating-energy use. We discuss our efforts to calculate annual energy savings and peak-power avoidance of HIR strategies in the building sector of the Greater Toronto Area. The analysis is focused on three major building types that offer most saving potentials: residence, office and retail store. Using an hourly building energy simulation model, we quantify the energy saving potentials of (1) using cool roofs on individual buildings [direct effect], (2) planting deciduous shade trees near south and west walls of building [direct effect], (3) planting coniferous wind-shielding vegetation near building [direct effect], (4) ambient cooling by a large-scale program of urban reforestation with reflective building roofs and pavements [indirect effect], (5) and the combined direct and indirect effects. Results show potential annual energy savings of over $11M (with uniform residential and commercial electricity and gas prices of $0.084/kWh and $5.54/GJ) could be realized by ratepayers from the combined direct and indirect effects of HIR strategies. Of that total, about 88 percent was from the direct impact roughly divided equally among reflective roofs, shade trees and wind-shielding, and the remainder (12 percent) from the indirect impact of the cooler ambient air temperature. The residential sector accounts for over half (59 percent) of the total, offices 13 percent and retail stores 28 percent. Savings from cool roofs were about 20 percent, shade trees 30 percent, wind shielding of tree 37 percent, and indirect effect 12 percent. These ...
Date: November 30, 2001
Creator: Konopacki, Steven & Akbari, Hashem
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Energy savings for heat-island reduction strategies in Chicago and Houston (including updates for Baton Rouge, Sacramento, and Salt Lake City)

Description: In 1997, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) established the ''Heat Island Reduction Initiative'' to quantify the potential benefits of Heat-Island Reduction (HIR) strategies (i.e., shade trees, reflective roofs, reflective pavements and urban vegetation) to reduce cooling-energy use in buildings, lower the ambient air temperature and improve urban air quality in cities, and reduce CO2 emissions from power plants. Under this initiative, the Urban Heat Island Pilot Project (UHIPP) was created with the objective of investigating the potential of HIR strategies in residential and commercial buildings in three initial UHIPP cities: Baton Rouge, LA; Sacramento, CA; and Salt Lake City, UT. Later two other cities, Chicago, IL and Houston, TX were added to the UHIPP. In an earlier report we summarized our efforts to calculate the annual energy savings, peak power avoidance, and annual CO2 reduction obtainable from the introduction of HIR strategies in the initial three cities. This report summarizes the results of our study for Chicago and Houston. In this analysis, we focused on three building types that offer the highest potential savings: single-family residence, office and retail store. Each building type was characterized in detail by vintage and system type (i.e., old and new building constructions, and gas and electric heat). We used the prototypical building characteristics developed earlier for each building type and simulated the impact of HIR strategies on building cooling- and heating-energy use and peak power demand using the DOE-2.1E model. Our simulations included the impact of (1) strategically-placed shade trees near buildings [direct effect], (2) use of high-albedo roofing material on the building [direct effect], (3) urban reforestation with high-albedo pavements and building surfaces [indirect effect] and (4) combined strategies 1, 2, and 3 [direct and indirect effects]. We then estimated the total roof area of air-conditioned buildings in each city using readily ...
Date: February 28, 2002
Creator: Konopacki, S. & Akbari, H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Experiment Station Work, [Volume] 41

Description: Bulletin issued by the U. S. Department of Agriculture compiling selected articles from the Agricultural Experiment Stations. This bulletin contains articles on: Wells and Pure Water, Phosphates and Soil Acidity, Pure Seed v. Poor Seed, Disease-Resistant Clover, Eradication of Wild Mustard, Sterilization of Soils for Preventing Plant Diseases, Seedless Tomatoes, Pickling Olives and Mock Olives, Hay Box or Fireless Cooker, Insect Enemies of Shade Trees, Feeding Whole Grain, Improvement of Cattle, Ventilation of Stables, Hog Cots, Preserving Eggs, and American Camembert Cheese.
Date: 1907
Creator: United States. Office of Experiment Stations.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department