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Mindfulness, Self-Esteem and Positive States of Mind: Correlates of Mental Health in LGBT Individuals

Description: Presentation for the 2012 University Scholars Day at the University of North Texas discussing research on mindfulness, self-esteem, positive states of mind, and correlates of mental health in lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) individuals.
Date: April 19, 2012
Creator: Stem, Wiley & Vosvick, Mark A.
Partner: UNT Honors College

Being LGBT in Asia: Vietnam Country Report

Description: Report based on regional discussions describing the legal and social environment for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) persons in Vietnam including background and contextual information, relevant organizations in the country, and associated reference information.
Date: 2014
Creator: Hanh, Dinh Hong & Tung, Tran Khac
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Being LGBT in Asia: Indonesia Country Report

Description: Report based on regional discussions describing the legal and social environment for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) persons in Indonesia including background and contextual information, relevant organizations in the country, and associated reference information.
Date: 2014
Creator: {{{name}}}
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Being LGBT in Asia: China Country Report

Description: Report based on regional discussions describing the legal and social environment for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) persons in China including background and contextual information, relevant organizations in the country, and associated reference information.
Date: 2014
Creator: {{{name}}}
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Being LGBT in Asia: Mongolia Country Report

Description: Report based on regional discussions describing the legal and social environment for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) persons in Mongolia including background and contextual information, relevant organizations in the country, and associated reference information.
Date: 2014
Creator: {{{name}}}
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Being LGBT in Asia: {{{country}}} Country Report

Description: Report based on regional discussions describing the legal and social environment for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) persons in Cambodia including background and contextual information, relevant organizations in the country, and associated reference information.
Date: 2014
Creator: {{{name}}}
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Being LGBT in Asia: Nepal Country Report

Description: Report based on regional discussions describing the legal and social environment for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) persons in Nepal including background and contextual information, relevant organizations in the country, and associated reference information.
Date: 2014
Creator: Pokhrel, Adheep & Shrestha, Bharat Man
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Anger, Forgiveness and Mindfulness: Correlates of Perceived Stress in an LGB Sample

Description: A sexual minority is someone who identifies as lesbian, gay or bisexual (LGB). According to the Minority Stress Model (Meyer, 2003), sexual minorities encounter significant levels of stress due to their minority group status, thus they are more likely to experience perceived stress. Our cross-sectional, correlational study aimed to explore the relationships between forgiveness, mindfulness and anger and how they are related to perceived stress in a convenience sample of ethnically diverse LGB adults. We hypothesized that: 1) anger is positively associated with perceived stress; 2) forgiveness is negatively associated with perceived stress; 3) mindfulness is negatively associated with perceived stress; and 4) anger, forgiveness and mindfulness account for a significant proportion of the variance in perceived stress. 5) The relationship between anger and perceived stress is moderated by forgiveness. 6) The relationship between anger and perceived stress is moderated by mindfulness. Among LGB adults, the extant literature does not address these four variables in conjunction and the relationships between anger, forgiveness, mindfulness and stress has yet to be explored. Various statistical analyses were conducted, including a hierarchical linear regression to test our model. We found that our overall model accounted for 36% of the total variance in perceived stress (F(5, 142) = 17.31, p <.01) with anger (β = .31, t = 3.55, p = .001) and forgiveness (β = -.21, t = -2.56, p < .05) as the significant predictors. Contrary to prediction, forgiveness and mindfulness did not moderate the relationship between anger and perceived stress in our LGB sample. Limitations, strengths, future research and implications are discussed.
Date: December 2015
Creator: Schumacher, Matthew Robert
Partner: UNT Libraries

Shame Due to Heterosexism, Self-esteem and Perceived Stress: Correlates of Psychological Quality of Life in a Lesbian, Gay and Bisexual Sample

Description: Sexual minorities experience higher levels of stress than heterosexuals, which in turn affects coping and psychological quality of life (PQOL). Although many sexual minorities remain mentally healthy, a higher prevalence of mental disorders among members of the lesbian, gay and bisexual (LGB) communities exists; thus, LGB PQOL becomes an important area to examine. Several key factors are related to PQOL: shame due to heterosexism, self-esteem and perceived stress. Using minority stress model, I hypothesized that shame due to heterosexism and perceived stress are negatively correlated with PQOL, while self-esteem is positively correlated with PQOL. I hypothesized that collectively shame due to heterosexism, self-esteem and perceived stress account for a significant proportion of the variance in PQOL, that self-esteem moderates the relationship between perceived stress and PQOL and that age moderates the relationship between shame due to heterosexism and PQOL. I calculated Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient and found shame due to heterosexism was negatively correlated with PQOL (r(146) = -.21, p = .009), perceived stress was negatively correlated with PQOL (r (146) = -.69, p < .001) and self-esteem was positively correlated with PQOL (r(146) = .72, p < .001). I conducted a regression analysis and found our model accounted for 59% of the variance in PQOL (adj. R2 = .59, F(3, 144) = 68.88, p < .001). Self-esteem did moderate the relationship between perceived stress and PQOL (p = .029), but age did not moderate the relationship between shame due to heterosexism and PQOL. Results suggest perceived stress and self-esteem play key roles in sexual minorities’ PQOL. Implications are discussed.
Date: December 2015
Creator: Bonds, Stacy E.
Partner: UNT Libraries

A Mixed Methods Approach to Exploring Social Support and Resilience in Coping with Stigma and Psychological Distress among HIV-Positive Adults

Description: Since its emergence in the U.S., HIV has been a stigmatized illness. People living with HIV (PLH) are a minority and prone to psychological distress and poor mental health outcomes due to HIV-related stigma. PLH who identify with another minority group in addition to being HIV-positive (e.g., gay, African-American) experience multiple forms of oppression or layered stigma. Affirmative social support and resilience are negatively associated with HIV-stigma and are important coping resources for PLH. We used an explanatory sequential mixed methods design study involving a quantitative survey phase and a qualitative interview phase. We explored whether social support and resilience (Positive Psychological Resources) mediate or moderate the relationship between HIV Stigma and Psychological Distress among HIV-positive adults using partial least squares (PLS) path modeling and multiple regressions. Via PLS, we found Positive Psychological Resources partially mediated the relationship between HIV Stigma and Psychological Distress: the path between HIV Stigma and Psychological distress reduced (from t = 5.49, p = .000 to t = 2.39, p = .000) but remained statistically significant. Similarly, via regression, the Sobel test was significant (Sobel = .26, SE = .07, z = 3.63, p = .000). However, moderation was not found (HIV Stigma x Positive Psychological Resources β = .05, t = .66, p = .508). Overall, our quantitative survey and qualitative interview data were consistent. We anticipate that our findings will inform strengths-based therapeutic interventions to mitigate stress and stigma among PLH.
Date: August 2017
Creator: Fritz, Sarah-mee
Partner: UNT Libraries

Establishing a History and Trajectory of LGBT and Queer Studies Programs in the American Research University: Context for Advancing Academic Diversity and Social Transformation

Description: The system of higher education in the United States of America has retained some of its original character yet it has also grown in many ways. Among the contemporary priorities of colleges and universities are undergraduate student learning outcomes and success along with a growing focus on diversity. As a result, there has been a growing focus on ways to achieve compositional diversity and a greater sense of inclusion with meaningful advances through better access and resources for individuals from non-dominant populations. The clearest result of these advances for sexual and gender diversity has been a normalization of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) identities through positive visibility and greater acceptance on campus. However, it appears that relatively few institutions have focused on improving academic diversity and students’ cognitive growth around LGBTQ issues. Through historical inquiry and a qualitative approach, this study explored the fundamental aspects of formal LGBTQ studies academic programs at some of the leading American research universities, including Cornell University, the University of Maryland, College Park, and the University of Texas at Austin – a purposeful sample chosen from the Association of American Universities (AAU) member institutions with organized curricula focused on the study of sexual and gender diversity. The analysis of primary and secondary sources, including documents and interviews, helped create historical narratives that revealed: a cultural shift was necessary to launch a formal academic program in LGBTQ studies; this formalization of LGBTQ studies programs has been part of the larger effort to improve the campus climate for sexual and gender diversity; and there has been a common pattern to the administration and operation of LGBTQ studies. Clearly, the research shows that LGBTQ studies, as a field of study and formal curriculum, has become institutionalized at the American research university. A key outcome of this ...
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Date: August 2015
Creator: Kessler, M. David
Partner: UNT Libraries