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Contemporary Women Poets of Texas

Description: As a teacher of American literature in high school, I have become conscious of the importance of teaching students of that age level the lore and poetry of their native state. Poems of nature or local color in their own country will hold their interest when material from more distant points seems dull and uninteresting. Through my teaching I have become interested in the poetry of the Southwest and have enjoyed reading the poetry and knowing the poets through personal interview or correspondence.
Date: August 1942
Creator: Heatly, Katherine Stafford
Partner: UNT Libraries
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The Wordsworths' Scottish Tour

Description: Together Dorothy and William translate. a simple tour into aesthetic loveliness To his sister the journey was the juxtaposition of impoverished society and pastoral elegance. To Wordsworth the tour was a reawakening of poetic Impulse. Through his intense feeling for natural beauty, Wordsworth became the poet of all mankind..
Date: August 1956
Creator: Bingman, Marilyn L.
Partner: UNT Libraries
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The Development of Keats's Mythic Understanding of the Function of the Poet

Description: John Keats is a mythopoeic poet who created his own mythical substructure, often adapting traditional figures from mythology to give a special meaning to the entire canon of his major work. The early poems are hesitant, imitative, and groping, but the mature poems receive a large part of heir symbolic meaning from the substructure of Keats's myth of the poet on which they rest. In the works of John Keats, then, the reader finds a touchstone of experiences common to all humanity, shaped into Keats's central myth of the poet. He left the testament of a poet who could "see as a god sees, and take the depth/ Of things" recorded in his major poems and in some of the most sensitive letters ever written by a poet.
Date: August 1971
Creator: Glenn, Priscilla Ray
Partner: UNT Libraries
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La Temática Poética de Julián del Casal

Description: This thesis studies three of the most significant themes in the poetry of the Cuban Modernist, Julian del Casal. The poet's morbid fascination with death is characterized by an inability to adapt to his life environment, boredom, a strong self-destructive drive, and the concept of death as the ultimate joy and refuge. He reflects the Modernist aesthetic code in his cult of plastic and lyric beauty. An escapist, he sought refuge in an ideal world of perfection and elegance. This unobtainable goal resulted in deep melancholia and despair. The theme of love reflects a complete absence of passion and eroticism. The poet's categorical rejection of woman as a sensual object is accompanied by subtle insinuations concerning his own physical impotence and inability to love.
Date: August 1976
Creator: Pijuán, Roberto B.
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Collected Letters of W. B. Yeats

Description: The InteLex electronic edition of The Collected Letters of W. B. Yeats contains, complete, the three volumes of The Collected Letters which have appeared in print. In addition, the collection includes all of the letters from the remaining eleven (unpublished) volumes, with dating information (so far as this is known), but lacking the full annotation for which the printed volumes are justly famous. Scholars will therefore have immediate access to the primary texts of the complete edition even while the final editing and annotation for the greater part of it remains in progress. A total of 7,378 new letters are featured in the database. Of these, 88 are newly discovered letters belonging to the 1865-1904 period covered by the three published volumes. The remaining 7,290 letters belong to the 1905-1939 period which will be published in print and with full annotation in future volumes of the edition. Particular note should be made of the fact that the unannotated letters have not received final vetting (which will occur only as they are annotated prior to print publication) and are therefore published here in beta form. Some errors of transcription and of dating may therefore remain within this beta group of letters (although many seemingly obvious errors are in fact Yeats' own sometimes bizarre spelling).
Access: Restricted to UNT Community Members. Login required if off-campus.
Date: 1986~
Creator: Yeats, William Butler
Partner: UNT Libraries
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A Study of the Epithalamiums, Elegies, and Epyllion of Gaius Valerius Catullus

Description: The purpose of this thesis is to determine the limits of evidence concerning the biography of the Roman poet Catullus, the texts of his poems, and the earlier poetic influence on his longer works and to compare scholarly opinions about those topics. To attain those objectives, both classical authors and modern scholars were used as sources. This work has five chapters. The first outlines the problems of Catullan scholia. The second and third discuss his life and texts. The fourth and fifth concern Catullus' poetic creed and his borrowings from earlier poets and poetic traditions. This paper's conclusion is that, although no full assessment of the poet can be made without additional evidence, Catullus remains a major poetic figure deserving of additional study.
Date: August 1974
Creator: Duggan, John H.
Partner: UNT Libraries
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Browning's Theme: "The Letter Killeth, but the Spirit Giveth Life"

Description: This thesis is concerned with the establishment of an underlying philosophy for Robert Browning's many themes. It asserts that a notion found in II Corinthians 3:6, "the letter killeth, but the spirit giveth life," is basic to ideas such as Browning's belief in the superiority of life over art, of the wisdom of the heart over the intellect, and of honest skepticism over unexamined belief. The sources used to establish this premise are mainly the poems themselves, grouped in categories by subject matter of art, love, and religion. Some of his correspondence is also examined to ascertain how relevant the philosophy was to his own life. The conclusion is that the concept is, indeed, pervasive throughout Browning's poetry and extremely important to the man himself.
Date: August 1974
Creator: Rollins, Martha A.
Partner: UNT Libraries
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Elizabeth Barrett Browning: Quest for the Father

Description: This dissertation explores Elizabeth Barrett's dependency on the archetypal Victorian patriarch. Chapter I focuses on the psychological effects of this father-daughter relationship on Elizabeth Barrett. Chapter II addresses Barrett's acceptance of the conventional female role, which is suggested by the nature and the situation of the women she chooses to depict. These women are placed in situations where they can reveal their devotion to family, their capacity for passive endurance, and their wish to resist. Almost always, they choose death as an alternative to life where a powerful father figure is present. Chapter III concentrates on the highly sentimental images of women and children whom Barrett places in a divine order, where they exist untouched by the concerns of the social order of which they are a part. Chapter IV shows that the conventional ideologies of the time, society's commitment to the "angel in the house," and the small number of female role models before her increase her difficulty to find herself a place within this order. Chapter V discusses Aurora Leigh's mission to find herself an identity and to maintain the connection with her father or father substitute. Despite Elizabeth Barrett's desire to break away from her paternal ties and to establish herself as an independent woman and poet, her unconditional loyalty and love towards her father and her tremendous need for his affection, and the security he provides restrain her resistance and surface the child in her.
Date: December 1996
Creator: Yegenoglu, Dilara
Partner: UNT Libraries
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Earth Ascending: A Composition in Three Movements for Female Voice, Electroacoustic Music, and Video

Description: Earth Ascending is a composition in three movements scored for female voice, electroacoustic music, and video. Composed in the Year 2000, Earth Ascending lasts approximately sixteen minutes and was created specifically for live performance in which all three elements combine to create a sonic and visual environment. As such, no single element has greater importance than any other, with each of the three performing forces assuming a foreground role at various times throughout the work. Earth Ascending is defined by a single poem written by contemporary female British poets Jeni Counzyn, Jehanne Mehta, and Cynthia Fuller. The movements are named according to the title of each poem: Earth-Body, Light-Body; Wringcliff Beach; and Pool. The movements are separated in performance by five seconds of silence and black on the video screen. The paper accompanying the score of Earth Ascending is divided into five chapters, each discussing in detail an element central to the composition itself. The Introduction presents background information, general ideas, and approaches undertaken when creating the work. Chapters 1 through 3 investigate in detail the content of the electroacoustic music, voice, and video. Chapter 4 discusses scoring techniques, revealing approaches and methods undertaken to solve issues relating to notation and ways of accurately representing sound, pitch, and rhythm within the context of a mixed media work. Chapter 5 presents information relevant to the live performance of the piece.
Date: August 2000
Creator: Lillios, Elainie
Partner: UNT Libraries
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[News Script: Thought for Today]

Description: Script from the WBAP-TV/NBC station in Fort Worth, Texas, relating the thought for the day by Goethe, a German poet. "We always have time enough if we will but use it right."
Date: January 30, 1969, 6:30 a.m.
Creator: WBAP-TV (Television station : Fort Worth, Tex.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections
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Energy and Archetype: A Jungian Analysis of The Four Zoas by William Blake

Description: The purpose of this study is to examine the parallels between the tenets of Carl Jung's psychology and the mythopoeic structure of Blake's poem, The Four Zoas. The investigation is divided into three chapters. The first deals with the major conceptual parallels between the intellectual systems of the two men. The second is a detailed analysis of the poem, and the third concludes the study by discussing the originality of Blake's thought. Blake anticipated much of Jung's psychology. The parallels between the two are so strong that each man seems to corroborate and validate the opinions and insights of the other. The extent to which he foreshadows Jung reveals Blake to be one of the most original thinkers of any period of time.
Date: August 1974
Creator: Hamilton, Lee T.
Partner: UNT Libraries
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The Laureates’ Lens: Exposing the Development of Literary History and Literary Criticism From Beneath the Dunce Cap

Description: In this project, I examine the impact of early literary criticism, early literary history, and the history of knowledge on the perception of the laureateship as it was formulated at specific moments in the eighteenth century. Instead of accepting the assessments of Pope and Johnson, I reconstruct the contemporary impact of laureate writings and the writing that fashioned the view of the laureates we have inherited. I use an array of primary documents (from letters and journal entries to poems and non-fiction prose) to analyze the way the laureateship as a literary identity was constructed in several key moments: the debate over hack literature in the pamphlet wars surrounding Elkanah Settle’s The Empress of Morocco (1673), the defense of Colley Cibber and his subsequent attempt to use his expertise of theater in An Apology for the Life of Colley Cibber (1740), the consolidation of hack literature and state-sponsored poetry with the crowning of Colley Cibber as the King of the Dunces in Pope’s The Dunciad in Four Books (1742), the fashioning of Thomas Gray and William Mason as laureate rejecters in Mason’s Memoirs of the Life and Writings of William Whitehead (1788), Southey’s progressive work to abolish laureate task writing in his laureate odes 1813-1821, and, finally, in Wordsworth’s refusal to produce any laureate task writing during his tenure, 1843-1850. In each case, I explain how the construction of this office was central to the consolidation of literary history and to forging authorial identity in the same period. This differs from the conventional treatment of the laureates because I expose the history of the versions of literary history that have to date structured how scholars understand the laureate, and by doing so, reveal how the laureateship was used to create, legitimate and disseminate the model of literary history we still …
Date: December 2015
Creator: Moore, Lindsay Emory
Partner: UNT Libraries
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[Clipping: Poet laureate a 'Texan's Texan']

Description: Clipping from the San Antonio Express-News, "Poet laureate a 'Texan's Texan'," published April 29, 2007. The article is about musician and artist Steven Fromholz, who was recently recognized and designated Poet Laureate on April 19, 2007 to celebrate National Poetry Month. Fromholz said he is simply honoroed and teary-eyed.
Date: April 29, 2007
Creator: Porterfield, Anita
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

John Dryden Works Volume 2

Description: 3D scanned models miniature book of poetry. One volume in part of a collection of miniature volumes of poetry, essays, novels, and stories. Volumes are bound in publisher's embossed and textured blue cloth with blind-stamped rules and gilt urn device on front covers, same design on back covers without gilt, and ornately gilt spines with foliate forms and titles.
Date: 2016
Creator: Dryden, John
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections
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Heroism and Failure in Anglo-Saxon Poetry: the Ideal and the Real within the Comitatus

Description: This dissertation discusses the complicated relationship (known as the comitatus) of kings and followers as presented in the heroic poetry of the Anglo-Saxons. The anonymous poets of the age celebrated the ideals of their culture but consistently portrayed the real behavior of the characters within their works. Other studies have examined the ideals of the comitatus in general terms while referring to the poetry as a body of work, or they have discussed them in particular terms while referring to one or two poems in detail. This study is both broader and deeper in scope than are the earlier works. In a number of poems I have identified the heroic ideals and examined the poetic treatment of those ideals. In order to establish the necessary background, Chapter I reviews the historical sources, such as Tacitus, Bede, the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, and the work of modern historians. Chapter II discusses such attributes of the king as wisdom, courage, and generosity. Chapter III examines the role of aristocratic women within the society. Chapter IV describes the proper behavior of followers, primarily their loyalty in return for treasures earlier bestowed. Chapter V discusses perversions and failures of the ideal. The dissertation concludes that, contrary to the view that Anglo-Saxon literature idealized the culture, the poets presented a reasonably realistic picture of their age. Anglo-Saxon heroic poetry celebrates ideals of behavior which, even when they can be attained, are not successful in the real world of political life.
Date: May 1989
Creator: Nelson, Nancy Susan
Partner: UNT Libraries
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Swift in his Poetry

Description: Swift appears in many of his poems either in his o person or behind a poetic mask which does little to conceal his identity. The poems contain Swift's view of his own character. Even in the poems addressed to others, the most important subject is Swift himself. This study is divided into chapters which examine the various roles Swift assumed in both his private and public lives. Following a brief introduction are two chapters of more interest than significance. The first of these is concerned with poems on Swift as a houseguest. These poems frequently relate the difficulties Swift's eccentric behavior caused his hosts. The second deals with poems on Swift's relationships with friends such as Thomas Sheridan and Patrick Delany, as well as with a public adversary, Jonathan Smedley.
Date: August 1984
Creator: Kerbaugh, Jim Lawrence
Partner: UNT Libraries

Oral History Interview with Arthur M. Sampley, 1973-1974

Description: Interview with Dr. Arthur M. Sampley, a college professor, former college administrator, and former poet laureate from Denton Texas. In the interview, Dr. Sampley describes his life growing up in Denton and attending school at the University of Texas. He talks about becoming a poet and analyzes his poetry as well as describing tenure as director of libraries and vice-president for academic affairs at North Texas State College, his philosophy of teaching, and the desegregation of the college in 1955-56.
Access: Restricted to UNT Community Members. Login required if off-campus.
Date: November 8, 1973
Creator: Haggard, Margurite & Sampley, Arthur M.
Partner: UNT Oral History Program
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