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Environmental Management Science Program Symposium at the Fall 2001 Meeting of the American Chemical Society. Final technical report from 08/01/2001 to 07/31/2002

Description: The American Chemical Society held its 22nd National Meeting in Chicago, Illinois, August 26-30, 2001. During this meeting, the Environmental Management Science Program Symposium was held.
Date: October 1, 2002
Creator: Nagy, Kathryn L. & Felmy, Andrew R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Measuring Team Meeting Success: Does Everyone Really Need to Participate?

Description: Facilitators are encouraged to get all meeting attendees to participate in the meeting. There is the assumption made that, if they do participate, then this participation will increase the group's general satisfaction of the meeting. Also, knowing the factors that can increase the probability of a successful meeting has been a focus of previous research, yet attendee participation has not been studied. The current research study empirically examines participation's effect on meeting evaluations. This study is a field experiment conducted in a team-based organization, where successful meetings are critical. Data was collected on the amount of participation of team members in their weekly team meeting and their evaluations of the meeting. After running correlations and a principal components analysis, this study found a relationship between participation and meeting evaluations. A scale of meeting success was also created.
Date: August 2005
Creator: Longo, Jodi Olaine
Partner: UNT Libraries

Summary of sessions on nuclear reaction mechanisms

Description: A summary is provided to the sessions on nuclear reaction mechanisms of the International Conference on Nuclear Data for Science and Technology held May 19-24, 1997 in Trieste, Italy. Brief descriptions of Fission, Optical Model, Radiative capture of fast nucleons, codes, and new approaches are provide.
Date: May 1, 1997
Creator: Dietrich, F.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

UV-VIS-IR Spectral Responsivity Measurement System for Solar Cells

Description: NREL's PV Cell and Module Performance Characterization group has built a new spectral responsivity measurement system for solar cells. It uses a xenon arc lamp source, a single, grating monochrometer, and a fiber-optic bundle to couple the monochromatic light to the test device. The system has a spectral bandwidth of 2 nm, minimum spot diameter of 1.6 mm, a spectral range of 280-1330 nm, and uncertainty better than {+-}3% over most of this range. It is capable of incorporating light bias with intensities exceeding one sun. This paper discusses the system's features, capabilities, calibration, and measurement uncertainties.
Date: November 12, 1998
Creator: Field, H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Topical conference: Opportunities in biology for physicists. Conference summary

Description: The conference was aimed at early career physicists who were interested in exploring the possibilities of working at the interface between physics and biology, in particular, graduate students and postdocs considering applying the methods of physics to biological research. Areas of major importance were genomics and evolution, biological networks, biomolecular dynamics, high-resolution imaging of living cells, and technologies for biological investigation. A total of 205 persons attended the conference.
Date: December 16, 2002
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Applications and advances of positron beam spectroscopy: appendix a

Description: Over 50 scientists from DOE-DP, DOE-ER, the national laboratories, academia and industry attended a workshop held on November 5-7, 1997 at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory jointly sponsored by the DOE-Division of Materials Science, The Materials Research Institute at LLNL and the University of California Presidents Office. Workshop participants were charged to address two questions: Is there a need for a national center for materials analysis using positron techniques and can the capabilities at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory serve this need. To demonstrate the need for a national center the workshop participants discussed the technical advantages enabled by high positron currents and advanced measurement techniques, the role that these techniques will play in materials analysis and the demand for the data. There were general discussions lead by review talks on positron analysis techniques, and their applications to problems in semiconductors, polymers and composites, metals and engineering materials, surface analysis and advanced techniques. These were followed by focus sessions on positron analysis opportunities in these same areas. Livermore now leads the world in materials analysis capabilities by positrons due to developments in response to demands of science based stockpile stewardship. There was a detailed discussion of the LLNL capabilities and a tour of the facilities. The Livermore facilities now include the worlds highest current beam of keV positrons, a scanning pulsed positron microprobe under development capable of three dimensional maps of defect size and concentration, an MeV positron beam for defect analysis of large samples, and electron momentum spectroscopy by positrons. This document is a supplement to the written summary report. It contains a complete schedule, list of attendees and the vuegraphs for the presentations in the review and focus sessions.
Date: November 5, 1997
Creator: Howell, R. H., LLNL
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Proceedings of the LLNL Technical Women`s Symposium

Description: Women from institutions such as LLNL, LBL, Sandia, and SLAC presented papers at this conference. The papers deal with many aspects of global security, global ecology, and bioscience; they also reflect the challenges faced in improving business practices, communicating effectively, and expanding collaborations in the industrial world. Approximately 87 ``abstracts`` are included in six sessions; more are included in the addendum.
Date: December 31, 1994
Creator: von Holtz, Erica
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Organization and operation of the sixth international symposium on the natural radiation environment (NRE VI). Final report

Description: An important source of human exposure to radiation is the natural world including cosmic rays, cosmogonic radionuclides, natural terrestrial radionuclides, and radon isotopes and its decay products. Considerable effort is being expended on a worldwide basis to characterize the exposure to the natural radiation environment and determine the important pathways for the exposure to result in dose to tissue that leads to injury and disease. The problem of background exposure to naturally occurring radioactivity has been the subject of research since the initial discovery of the radioactivity of uranium and thorium. However, with the advent of artificial sources of radiation with both benefits (medical x-rays and nuclear medicine), and harm (Chernobyl fallout), the nature and magnitude of the natural radiation environment and the effects on various populations are important in the development of overall public health strategies as ALARA principles are applied. To facilitate the exchange of information and the review of uncertainties and scientific research priorities, a series of 5 international meetings on Natural Radiation Environment, 1963, 1987, 1991. This conference (Montreal, 1995) covers the range of natural radiation environments that give rise to human exposure and dose. This document is a program summary.
Date: December 31, 1995
Creator: Hopke, P.K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Applications and advances of positron beam spectroscopy

Description: Over 50 scientists from DOE-DP, DOE-ER, the national laboratories, academia and industry attended a workshop held on November 5-7, 1997 at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Workshop participants were charged to address two questions: Is there a need for a national center for materials analysis using positron techniques and can the capabilities at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory serve this need. To demonstrate the need for a national center, the workshop participants discussed the technical advantages enabled by high positron currents and advanced measurement techniques, the role that these techniques would play in materials analysis and the demand for the data. Livermore now leads the world in materials analysis capabilities by positrons due to developments in response to demands of stockpile stewardship. The Livermore facilities now include the world`s highest current beam of keV positrons, a scanning pulsed positron microprobe under development capable of three dimensional maps of defect size and concentration, an MeV positron beam for defect analysis of large samples, and electron momentum spectroscopy by positrons. It was concluded that the positron microprobe under development at LLNL and other new instruments that would be relocated at LLNL at the high current keV source are an exciting step forward in providing results for the positron technique. These new data will impact a wide variety of applications.
Date: March 18, 1998
Creator: Howell, R., LLNL
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

ICPEAC XX: A Retro- and Pro-Spective Analysis

Description: There is something magical about ``round birthdays.`` They make one stop and think about where he is, how he got there, and where he is going. The same is apparently true of conferences, especially those like ICPEAC which represent the periodic coming together of a broad range of scientists in a reasonably well-defined discipline. This Vienna conference is the 20th in the ICPEAC series, and a retro- and pro-spective analysis seems appropriate. At the first ICPEAC in New York (1958), there were about 50 participants. In Vienna (1997), there were more than 800 participants. How do we account for this growth? ICPEAC is one of the most democratic conferences of its size. For example, input from a general committee of 50 representing the many geographic and sub- disciplinary areas gives continuous refreshment of ideas for the invited program. And, as in any democracy, there is a constant state of turmoil and self doubt. After all, atomic collisions is a ``mature`` field, and was a ``mature`` field at the time of the first ICPEAC in 1958, 50 what can one expect in new developments? This self doubt is best expressed in the comment of Ben Bederson (the ``Father of ICPEAC``) following the second in Boulder, Colorado, in 1961: ``This conference is the second in a series of informal meetings organized by a group of workers in the general field of electronic and atomic collisions. The first such meeting was held at New York University in 1958, and we will probably continue to meet at irregular intervals in the future....`` As part of my ``keynote`` talk at the New York ICPEAC XVI in 1989, I gave a brief history of the conference which we can build on to round things off for our twentieth.
Date: December 31, 1997
Creator: Datz, S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Working group meeting on heavy vehicle aerodynamic drag: presentations and summary of comments and conclusion

Description: The first Working Group Meeting on Heavy Vehicle Aerodynamic Drag was held at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in Albuquerque, New Mexico on August 28, 1998. The purpose of the meeting was to review the proposed Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP) and provide an update on the Group"s progress. In addition, the technical details of each organization"s activities were presented and discussed. Presentations were given by representatives from the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Transportation Technology Office of Heavy Vehicle Technology (OHVT), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), SNL, University of Southern California (USC), California Institute of Technology (Caltech), and NASA Ames Research Center. These presenters are part of a DOE appointed Technical Team assigned to developing the MYPP. The goal of the MYPP is to develop and demonstrate the ability to simulate and analyze aerodynamic flow around heavy truck vehicles using existing and advanced computational tools (A Multi-Year Program Plan for the Aerodynamic Design of Heavy Vehicles, R. McCallen, D. McBride, W. Rutledge, F. Browand, A. Leonard, .I. Ross, UCRL-PROP- 127753 Dr. Rev 2, May 1998). This report contains the technical presentations (viewgraphs) delivered at the Meeting, briefly summarizes the comments and conclusions from the Meeting participants, and outlines the future actions.
Date: September 28, 1998
Creator: Browand, F; Gutierrez, W; Leonard, A; McBride, D; McCallen, R; Ross, J et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department