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[Chinzan-so Garden]

Description: Photograph of the Chinzan-so Garden in Tokyo, Japan. A garden path is visible in the foreground. A wooden bench is visible on the path leading to a small building. The path and building are surrounded by greenery.
Date: 1978
Creator: Gough, Ray
Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design

[Chinzan-so Garden]

Description: Photograph of the Chinzan-so Garden in Tokyo, Japan. Plants and trees are visible in the foreground. A bamboo roof and an orange sign are visible in the foreground. Another roof is visible in the background.
Date: 1978
Creator: Gough, Ray
Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design

[Chartres Cathedral landscaping]

Description: Photograph of Cathedral of Our Lady of Chartres in Chartres, France. In the foreground, the landscaping outside of the cathedral entrance is visible. A patch of grass with sculpted hedges and flowerbeds sits next to a gravel walkway. The walkway leads to the cathedral entrance in the background.
Date: unknown
Creator: Gough, Ray
Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design

Planting the roadside.

Description: Describes the benefits of planting trees and shrubs on the roadside, and the proper procedures for doing so.
Date: June 1926
Creator: Mulford, Furman Lloyd, b. 1869.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

[Chinzan-so Garden]

Description: Photograph of the Chinzan-so Garden in Tokyo, Japan. A large tree is visible in the foreground on a hill. A building is visible at the bottom of the hill surrounded by greenery.
Date: 1978
Creator: Gough, Ray
Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design

[Garden hillside]

Description: Photograph of a hill in the Chinzan-so Garden in Tokyo, Japan. The hillside is visible in the foreground. A building is visible behind the hill. The building is covered in vines.
Date: 1978
Creator: Gough, Ray
Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design

[Pagoda]

Description: Photograph of a pagoda in the Chinzan-so Garden in Tokyo, Japan. The pagoda is visible in the background at the end of a grass lawn. Trees are visible behind the pagoda.
Date: 1978
Creator: Gough, Ray
Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design

Guidelines for Estimating Unmetered Landscaping Water Use

Description: The document lays-out step by step instructions to estimate landscaping water using two alternative approaches: evapotranspiration method and irrigation audit method. The evapotranspiration method option calculates the amount of water needed to maintain a healthy turf or landscaped area for a given location based on the amount of water transpired and evaporated from the plants. The evapotranspiration method offers a relatively easy “one-stop-shop” for Federal agencies to develop an initial estimate of annual landscape water use. The document presents annual irrigation factors for 36 cities across the U.S. that represents the gallons of irrigation required per square foot for distinct landscape types. By following the steps outlined in the document, the reader can choose a location that is a close match their location and landscape type to provide a rough estimate of annual irrigation needs without the need to research specific data on their site. The second option presented in the document is the irrigation audit method, which is the physical measurement of water applied to landscaped areas through irrigation equipment. Steps to perform an irrigation audit are outlined in the document, which follow the Recommended Audit Guidelines produced by the Irrigation Association.[5] An irrigation audit requires some knowledge on the specific procedures to accurately estimate how much water is being consumed by the irrigation equipment.
Date: July 28, 2010
Creator: McMordie Stoughton, Kate
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Beautifying the home grounds.

Description: Describes practical and aesthetic uses for trees, shrubs, and vines in home landscapes. Discusses the benefits of home landscape planning.
Date: 1909
Creator: United States. Dept. of Agriculture.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessment for Landscape Waste

Description: DOE orders mandate the development of a waste minimization program. The program`s goals are to: reduce volumes of wastes and toxicity; implement a system of tracking and reporting improvements; and devise a method for performing tasks. To satisfy the requirements of this program, Sandia conducts pollution prevention opportunity assessments (PPOAs) to identify waste-generating processes. The information collected from a PPOA then is used to identify waste minimization opportunities. This pollution prevention opportunity assessment was conducted using Sandia`s new methodology for prioritizing, evaluating and managing site-wide waste streams. This new methodology and the list of priority waste streams are described in the wastes revision of the Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessment Plant. This PPOA addresses landscape waste minimization, partially in response to recent legislation and regulations.
Date: August 1, 1996
Creator: Phillips, N.M. & Raubfogel, S.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Landscaping for energy efficiency

Description: This publication by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory addresses the use of landscaping for energy efficiency. The topics of the publication include minimizing energy expenses; landscaping for a cleaner environment; climate, site, and design considerations; planning landscape; and selecting and planting trees and shrubs. A source list for more information on landscaping for energy efficiency and a reading list are included.
Date: April 1, 1995
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A technology to analyze spatiotemporal landscape dynamics: Application to Cadiz Township (Wisconsin)

Description: As landscape ecology has matured, it has gone beyond description of land-use changes, to examining the functional relationships between spatial patterns of landscapes and ecological processes. Attempts to describe these relationships at larger scales or in complex landscapes have been hampered by the lack of spatially explicit distributed parameter models linked dynamically to geographical information systems (GIS). This paper describes developments we have made to link such models to GIS and to develop visualization methods (a graphical interface) that permits the user to readily manipulate large element files containing model parameters. We then present preliminary results illustrating the effects of pattern (in an agricultural landscape) on water and material flow across a heterogeneous landscape composed of multiple watersheds. These dynamics are driven in large measure by the location, size, and number of forest patches. By use of soil, hydrologic, and vegetation data from a real landscape, the effects of spatial relocation of vegetation on water and sediment dynamics are explored through the model-GIS combination. The spatiotemporal modeling approach described here could be useful in effectively managing ecosystem restoration and rehabilitation at the landscape scale.
Date: September 1, 1993
Creator: Krummel, J. R.; Dunn, C. P.; Eckert, T. C. & Ayers, A. J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Simulation of landscape disturbances and the effect of climatic change. Final report, July 15, 1990--January 14, 1993

Description: Altering the natural disturbance regime of a landscape produces changes in the structure of that landscape as the landscape adjusts to the new disturbance regime. A computer simulation model was designed to enable analyses of the longterm changes to be expected in landscapes as their disturbance regime changes. The model, DISPATCH, is the first dynamic spatial simulation model built around a geographical information system (GIS). The model also includes a new set of programs, the r.le programs, that is the first set of programs designed for calculating landscape structure measures within a GIS. The DISPATCH model was used, to analyze the effects of human alterations of disturbance regimes and global change on landscape structure. Landscapes do not adjust quickly to these alterations based on available data. Landscapes subjected to warming or to longterm fire suppression experience a decline in patch richness, Shannon diversity, the amount of edge and contrast, but an increase in distance between patches, angular second moment (texture measure) and patch size. In contrast, landscapes subjected to cooling, the short-term effects of fire suppression, fragmentation, or traditional prescribed burning tend to respond with increasing richness, Shannon diversity, edge, and contrast, but declining distance, angular second moment, and size. The pattern of response is different at different scales, with important implications for species.
Date: April 1, 1993
Creator: Baker, W. L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department