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Immigration Benefits: Fifteenth Report Required by the Haitian Refugee Immigration Fairness Act of 1998

Description: Correspondence issued by the Government Accountability Office with an abstract that begins "This report responds to certain requirements of the Haitian Refugee Immigration Fairness Act (HRIFA) of 1998 that authorized certain Haitian nationals and their dependents to apply to adjust their status to lawful permanent residence. Section 902 (k) of the act requires the Comptroller General to report every 6 months on the number of Haitian nationals who have applied and been approved to adjust their status to lawful permanent residence. The reports are to contain a breakdown of the number of Haitians who applied and the number who were approved as asylum applicants, parolees, children without parents, orphaned children, or abandoned children; or as the eligible dependents of these applicants, including spouses, children, and unmarried sons or daughters. Reports are to be provided until all applications have been finally adjudicated. This is our fifteenth report. Our objectives for this report were to determine (1) the number and categories of applicants who filed applications with USCIS or EOIR and (2) the number and categories of applicants whose applications were approved by United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) or the Executive Office for Immigration Review (EOIR)."
Date: November 9, 2006
Creator: United States. Government Accountability Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

National Applications Office Certification Review

Description: Correspondence issued by the Government Accountability Office with an abstract that begins "Since the 1960s, classified satellite information collected by intelligence agencies has been used, from time to time, by federal civilian agencies and other non-intelligence entities for civil, scientific, and environmental purposes (such as mapping, disaster relief, and environmental research). These uses have historically been coordinated by the Civil Applications Committee (CAC) led by the U.S. Geological Survey, a component of the Department of the Interior. Following the events of September 11, 2001, attention has turned to information sharing as a key element in developing comprehensive and practical approaches to defending against potential terrorist attacks. Having information on threats, vulnerabilities, and incidents can help an agency better understand the risks and determine what preventive measures should be implemented. The ability to share such terrorism-related information can also unify the efforts of federal, state, and local government agencies, as well as the private sector in preventing or minimizing terrorist attacks. Exchanging terrorism-related information continues to be a significant challenge for federal, state, and local governments--one that we recognize is not easily addressed. Accordingly, since January 2005, we have designated information sharing for homeland security a high-risk area. Citing a growing need to use classified satellite information for civil or domestic purposes, in 2005, an independent study group reviewed the future role of the CAC and concluded that although the civil domestic users were well supported through the CAC, homeland security and law enforcement users lacked a coherent, organized, and focused process to access classified satellite information. In 2007, the Office of the Director of National Intelligence designated the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) as the executive agency and home of a newly created National Applications Office (NAO), whose mission would be to process requests for classified satellite information from, among ...
Date: November 6, 2008
Creator: United States. Government Accountability Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Weaponry: Availability of Military .50 Caliber Ammunition

Description: Correspondence issued by the General Accounting Office with an abstract that begins "Pursuant to a congressional request, GAO provided information on how military .50 caliber ammunition, including armor-piercing and armor-piercing incendiary ammunition, becomes available for civilian purchase, focusing on the: (1) process by which the Department of Defense (DOD) disposed of the .50 caliber ammunition; (2) initial process used by the contractor that demilitarized the ammunition; and (3) contractor's manufacturing and marketing practices for the demilitarized ammunition."
Date: June 30, 1999
Creator: United States. General Accounting Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Executive Guide: Best Practices in Achieving Consistent, Accurate Physical Counts of Inventory and Related Property

Description: Guidance issued by the General Accounting Office with an abstract that begins "This Executive Guide describes fundamental practices and procedures used in the private sector to achieve consistent and accurate physical counts of inventory and related property. The Guide summarizes the fundamental principles that have been successfully implemented by companies recognized for their outstanding record of inventory management. It also explains and describes leading practices from which the federal government may be able to draw lessons and ideas. This guide applies to most forms of federal inventory, but some of the practices discussed may not be applicable to bulk, natural resource, and nonturning inventories, such as the Department of Energy's strategic petroleum reserve."
Date: March 1, 2002
Creator: United States. General Accounting Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Juvenile Justice: A Time Frame for Enhancing Grant Monitoring Documentation and Verification of Data Quality Would Help Improve Accountability and Resource Allocation Decisions

Description: Correspondence issued by the Government Accountability Office with an abstract that begins "From fiscal years 2006 through 2008, the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) within the Department of Justice (DOJ) awarded $1.2 billion in funds through approximately 2,000 grants in support of its mission to help states and communities prevent and reduce juvenile delinquency and victimization and improve their juvenile justice systems. OJJDP awards grants to states, territories, localities, and organizations to address a variety of issues, such as reducing juvenile substance abuse, combating Internet crimes against children, preventing youth gang involvement, and providing youth mentoring services. The scope and administration of OJJDP grants also vary, ranging from private organization recipients that implement programs directly in a single community to states that administer grants by awarding the funds they receive to subgrantees to implement programs locally and statewide. Assessing the performance of these programs through grant monitoring is a key management tool to hold grantees accountable for implementing programs as agreed to in their awards, to verify they are making progress toward the objectives of their programs, and to ensure that grant funds are used in support of OJJDP's mission. DOJ's Office of Justice Programs (OJP) establishes grant monitoring policies for its components, including OJJDP. In 2008, the DOJ Office of the Inspector General identified grant management, including maintaining proper oversight of grantees to ensure grant funds are used as intended, as a critical issue and among the department's top management challenges. In the past, we have identified concerns specific to OJJDP's grant monitoring activities. In October 2001, we reported that OJJDP was not consistently documenting its grant monitoring activities, such as required phone contacts between grant managers and grantees, and as a result could not determine the level of monitoring being performed by grant managers. We ...
Date: September 22, 2009
Creator: United States. Government Accountability Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Land Acquisitions: Agencies Generally Used Similar Standards and Appraisal Methodologies in CALFED and CVPIA Transactions

Description: Correspondence issued by the General Accounting Office with an abstract that begins "Since 1994, the CALFED Delta-Bay and Central Valley Project Improvement Act has provided more than $63 million to buy private lands in California for wetlands mitigation and wildlife enhancement. Federal agencies and nonprofit organizations have acquired 101,800 acres--94,300 acres in full ownership and 7,500 acres in partial interest or easements that restrict how land may be used. The three federal agencies and nonprofit organization GAO reviewed use the Uniform Standards for Federal Land Acquisitions for appraisals. All the entities developed and used supplemental appraisal guidance, which was generally consistent across the entities. The agencies and nonprofit organization used similar methodologies with one exception. The National Resources Conservation Service does not consider the land's residual value when making its appraisals as specified in the Uniform Standards."
Date: January 23, 2002
Creator: United States. General Accounting Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

FBI: Delivery of ATF Report on TWA Flight 800 Crash

Description: Correspondence issued by the General Accounting Office with an abstract that begins "Pursuant to a congressional request, GAO provided information on whether the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) delivered the Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms' (ATF) Trans World Airlines (TWA) flight 800 crash report to the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB)."
Date: August 13, 1999
Creator: United States. General Accounting Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Office of Special Counsel Needs to Follow Structured Life Cycle Management Practices for Its Case Tracking System

Description: Correspondence issued by the Government Accountability Office with an abstract that begins "The Office of Special Counsel (OSC) is charged with safeguarding the merit system by protecting federal employees and applicants for employment from prohibited personnel practices, such as discrimination, nepotism, and retaliation against whistleblowing. An individual who feels that a prohibited personnel practice has occurred may file a claim with OSC, which OSC then investigates and on which it may seek corrective or disciplinary action through negotiation with agencies or prosecution of claims before the Merit Systems Protection Board. In addition, federal employees, former federal employees, and applicants for federal employment may also disclose to OSC alleged wrongdoing by federal employees (termed whistleblower disclosures), including violations of law, gross mismanagement, or abuse of authority. OSC also provides advisory opinions and enforces Hatch Act restrictions on the political activities of individuals employed by the federal and District of Columbia governments as well as certain state and local government employees in connection with programs financed by federal funds. OSC also prosecutes claims before the Merit Systems Protection Board on behalf of federal employees, former federal employees, and applicants for federal employment under the Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act of 1994 (USERRA), which protects the employment and reemployment rights of federal and nonfederal employees who leave their employment to perform military service and prohibits discrimination against individuals because of their military service. OSC reports annually to Congress on the number of all types of cases it receives, processes, and closes as well as the disposition of those cases. cases. In the course of two prior reviews at OSC, we found discrepancies in the data generated by OSC's case tracking system--OSC 2000--in the number of cases pending at the beginning of a fiscal year as well as cases received and closed ...
Date: February 16, 2007
Creator: United States. Government Accountability Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Status of Funding for the Central America Regional Security Initiative

Description: Correspondence issued by the Government Accountability Office with an abstract that begins "As of September 30, 2011, of the $350 million that U.S. agencies had allocated to support CARSI activities, the Department of State (State) and the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) had disbursed over $75 million of INCLE, ESF, and NADR funds. In addition, State had committed almost $22 million of FMF funds to support CARSI activities. The two principal accounts for CARSI are the INCLE and ESF accounts. U.S. agencies also allocated funds for Central America from the NADR and FMF accounts. From fiscal years 2008 through 2011, State and USAID disbursed about $44.4 million in INCLE funds, $25.9 million in ESF funds, and almost $5 million in NADR funds to support CARSI activities in partner countries. The agencies used the funds to support programs in Central American countries that strengthen law enforcement and maritime interdiction capabilities, support capacity building and training programs, and deter and detect border criminal activity."
Date: January 30, 2013
Creator: United States. Government Accountability Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Department of the Navy: Unauthorized Activity Codes Used to Requisition New and Excess DOD Property

Description: Correspondence issued by the General Accounting Office with an abstract that begins "GAO examined Navy inventory management activities to determine whether any unauthorized activity codes had been used to requisition new and excess property. GAO found that as of June 2000, the Navy maintained 2,002 activity codes identified as unauthorized to requisition government property. However, during the last five years, 663 of these codes were used to requisition more than $2 billion in new and excess government property. In addition, there were no safeguards in the Defense Automatic Addressing System Center or the Defense Reutilization and Marketing Service to prevent these activity codes from being used. This has created a condition in which government property is vulnerable to waste, fraud, and abuse."
Date: January 8, 2001
Creator: United States. General Accounting Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Review of Special Counsel Expenses for 6 Months Ended September 30, 2008

Description: Correspondence issued by the Government Accountability Office with an abstract that begins "This report presents the results of GAO's review of the expenses of the Office of Special Counsel-Patrick J. Fitzgerald (OSC-Fitzgerald) for the 6 months ended September 30, 2008. The expenses we reviewed were those made by the Department of Justice (DOJ) between April 1, 2008, and September 30, 2008, from the permanent, indefinite appropriation (fund) for OSC-Fitzgerald. To determine if there were additional payments made subsequent to the 6-month period covered by our review, we also reviewed expenses paid out of the fund between October 1, 2008, and February 28, 2009. DOJ determined that the appropriation established by Public Law 100-2021 to fund expenses by independent counsels pursuant to the independent counsel law or other law is available to fund the expenses of U.S. Attorney Patrick J. Fitzgerald, who was appointed as a special counsel within the Department of Justice by the then-Acting Attorney General. Under this law, we are required to perform semiannual financial reviews of expenses from the fund, and, we report our findings to the House and Senate Appropriations Committees. To satisfy this requirement, we review each expense processed by DOJ to determine whether it was properly authorized and approved, supported by appropriate documentation, recorded accurately, and made in accordance with selected provisions of laws and regulations."
Date: March 31, 2009
Creator: United States. Government Accountability Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Immigration Benefits: Ninth Report Required by the Haitian Refugee Immigration Fairness Act of 1998

Description: Correspondence issued by the General Accounting Office with an abstract that begins "This report responds to certain requirements of the Haitain Refugee Immigration Fairness Act of 1998 that authorized certain Haitian nationals and their dependents to apply to adjust their status to legal permanent residence. Section 902(k) of the act requires the Comptroller General to report every 6 months on the number of Haitian nationals who have applied and been approved to adjust their status to legal permanent residence. The reports are to contain a breakdown of the number of Haitians who applied and the number who were approved as asylum applicants, parolees, children without parents, orphaned children, or abandoned children; or as the eligible dependents of these applicants, including spouses, children, and unmarried sons or daughters. Reports are to be provided until all applications have been finally adjudicated."
Date: April 21, 2003
Creator: United States. General Accounting Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Drug Enforcement Administration's Reporting of Arrests

Description: Correspondence issued by the General Accounting Office with an abstract that begins "The Drug Enforcement Administration's (DEA) Caribbean Division was alleged recently to have taken inappropriate credit for arrests to gain more resources. To claim credit for drug-related arrests, DEA agents must be directly involved in domestic arrests and provide "substantial assistance" to host-country law enforcement officials in foreign arrests. DEA's Agents Manual defines substantial assistance as active participation or furnishing of information or funds that lead to an arrest. Agents must complete a "Personal History Report" on each person arrested and complete a "Report of Investigation" on the investigative activities leading to the arrest. DEA uses the Personal History Report to track the number of arrests. DEA officials told GAO that arrest data do not serve as a basis for requesting additional resources in the budget development process. DEA's internal control procedures and inspection programs include (1) on-site inspections of its domestic and foreign offices and (2) annual self-inspections by divisional offices. To ensure the validity of its arrest data, in August 2001, the then acting administrator changed DEA's inspection programs--from a review of a random sample of arrests to a comprehensive review of all arrests. GAO's reviews of DEA inspection reports indicated that significant over-reporting of arrests may have been a one-time occurrence."
Date: February 13, 2002
Creator: United States. General Accounting Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Multiple U.S. Agencies Provided Billions of Dollars to Train and Equip Foreign Police Forces

Description: Correspondence issued by the Government Accountability Office with an abstract that begins "Over the past few years, the United States has increased its emphasis on training and equipping foreign police as a means of supporting a wide range of U.S. foreign-policy goals, including countering terrorists overseas and stopping the flow of narcotics to the United States. Funding for these activities has increased significantly since we last reported on these issues in 1992. In response to congressional request, this report provides estimates of the funding the U.S. government provided for activities to train and equip foreign police, hereafter referred to as "police assistance," during fiscal year 2009. We defined "police" as all law-enforcement units or personnel with arrest, investigative, or interdiction authorities."
Date: April 27, 2011
Creator: United States. Government Accountability Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Follow-up Information on the Operations of the Department of Justice's Office of Professional Responsibility

Description: Correspondence issued by the General Accounting Office with an abstract that begins "In response to concerns about the professionalism and conduct of some Department of Justice attorneys, as well as the process of holding them accountable to ethical standards, this report provides information on Justice's Office of Professional Responsibility (OPR). GAO obtained information on the types of allegations OPR was able to substantiate against attorneys, the source of the allegations, the specific allegations, and OPR's recommendations for disciplinary actions. OPR generally placed its findings in the attorneys' official personnel folder, either temporarily or permanently, depending on the severity of misconduct. OPR said that although some attorneys under investigation retired or resigned from the Department, it was unable to determine whether they left because of the investigation. Those attorneys would deny that their departure was triggered by the investigation, and OPR officials said it would be difficult to establish a cause-an-effect relationship. OPR would, however, continue the investigation if other Justice employees were involved or if the allegations were serious. When OPR administratively closed a case because the issues were before the courts, it flagged these cases in its tracking system so that it could continue its investigations at a later date."
Date: January 19, 2001
Creator: United States. General Accounting Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Limited 'Voided Arrest' Data From Federal, State, and Local Agencies

Description: Correspondence issued by the General Accounting Office with an abstract that begins "A "voided arrest" is any arrest resulting in the release of a person without the filing of formal charges, dismissal of proceedings against the person arrested, or a determination that the arrest was without probable cause. GAO's ongoing review of the number of "voided arrests," originally intended to support the Clear Your Good Name Act, was closed out because of the impact of the September 11 terrorist attacks on the legislative agenda in Congress. Complete data on the number of "voided arrests," as defined by the Clear Your Good Name Act (H.R. 1154) that occur at national and state levels are not available. None of the federal, state, or local agencies GAO contacted use the term "voided arrest." They do not have data for the category "voided arrests," and the data that they have do not include all arrests in those jurisdictions that can be considered "voided arrests" as defined by H.R. 1154. The Bureau of Justice Statistics and the state criminal history record repositories generally have data for the arrest disposition categories of prosecutor declinations and dismissals, and these dispositions can be considered "voided arrests." However, prosecutor declinations and court dismissals occur for many reasons, and obtaining and analyzing data on these would be extremely difficult and time-consuming."
Date: November 30, 2001
Creator: United States. General Accounting Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Immigration Benefits: Fifth Report Required by the Haitian Immigration Fairness Act of 1998

Description: Correspondence issued by the General Accounting Office with an abstract that begins "The Haitian Refugee Immigration Fairness Act of 1998 authorizes Haitian nationals and their dependents to apply to adjust their status to legal permanent residence. This report contains a breakdown of the numbers of Haitians who applied and the number who were approved as asylum applicants, parolees, children without parents, orphaned children, or abandoned children, or as the eligible dependents of these applicants. GAO found that as of March 2001, the Immigration and Naturalization Service had received 35,424 applications and had approved 1,454 of them. The Executive Office for Immigration Review had 107 applications filed and had approved 76 of them."
Date: April 20, 2001
Creator: United States. General Accounting Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Juvenile Justice: Technical Assistance and Better Defined Evaluation Plans Will Help to Improve Girls' Delinquency Programs

Description: Correspondence issued by the Government Accountability Office with an abstract that begins "Girls' delinquency has attracted the attention of federal, state, and local policymakers for more than a decade as girls have increasingly become involved in the juvenile justice system. For example, from 1995 through 2005, delinquency caseloads for girls in juvenile justice courts nationwide increased 15 percent while boys' caseloads decreased by 12 percent. Also, from 1995 through 2005, the number of girls' cases nationwide involving detention increased 49 percent compared to a 7 percent increase for boys. More recently, in 2007, 29 percent of juvenile arrests--about 641,000 arrests--involved girls, who accounted for 17 percent of juvenile violent crime arrests and 35 percent of juvenile property crime arrests. Further, in a 2007 survey of states conducted by the Federal Advisory Committee on Juvenile Justice, 22 states listed girls' delinquency as an issue affecting their states' juvenile justice systems. State justice officials responding to the survey noted that juvenile female offenses have increased sharply and also noted that juvenile female offenders generally had more serious and wide-ranging service needs than juvenile male offenders, including treatment for substance abuse and mental health conditions. As programs have been developed at the state and local levels in recent years that specifically target preventing girls' delinquency or intervening after girls have become involved in the juvenile justice system, it is important that agencies providing grants and practitioners operating the programs have information about which of these programs are effective. In this way, agencies can help to ensure that limited federal, state, and local funds are well spent. In general, effectiveness is determined through program evaluations, which are systematic studies conducted to assess how well a program is working--that is, whether a program produced its intended effects. To help ensure that grant funds are being ...
Date: July 24, 2009
Creator: United States. Government Accountability Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Immigration Benefits: Eighth Report Required by the Haitian Refugee Immigration Fairness Act of 1998

Description: Correspondence issued by the General Accounting Office with an abstract that begins "The Haitian Refugee Immigration Fairness Act (HRIFA) of 1998 authorized certain Haitian nationals and their dependents to apply to adjust their status to legal permanent residence. Section 902(k) of the act requires the Comptroller General to report every six months on the number of Haitian nationals who have applied and been approved to adjust their status to legal permanent residence. The reports are to contain a breakdown of the numbers who applied and the number who were approved as asylum applicants, parolees, children without parents, orphaned children, or abandoned children; or as the eligible dependents of these applicants, including spouses, children, and unmarried sons or daughters. As of September 30, 2002, the Immigration and Naturalization Service had received a total of 36,774 HRIFA applications and had approved 8,410 of these applications. The Executive Office for Immigration Review had 339 applications filed and had approved 117 of them."
Date: October 22, 2002
Creator: United States. General Accounting Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Bureau of Prisons Contract Payments

Description: Correspondence issued by the General Accounting Office with an abstract that begins "GAO reviewed the Bureau of Prisons to determine whether it had made overpayments to contractors. During fiscal year 2001, the Bureau of Prisons had 24 open construction contracts that totaled about $1.9 billion. In addition to general disbursement controls, GAO found internal controls specific to construction contracts in which both the project representative and the contracting officer must approve each monthly progress payment invoice. GAO sampled 27 payments on five construction contracts to determine if construction contract payment controls were properly designed, in place, and operating to prevent or detect overpayments. GAO found that the internal controls were in place and operating and construction contract payment amounts were correct, or, if errors occurred, they were detected and corrected promptly as a normal part of the payment system. A few minor clerical errors were subsequently detected and corrected by the Bureau of Prisons through its own routine control procedures before GAO made its review. GAO concludes that the risk of undetected construction contractor overpayments at the Bureau of Prisons appears to be small."
Date: March 20, 2002
Creator: United States. General Accounting Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Capitol Preservation Commission Attestation Engagement

Description: Correspondence issued by the General Accounting Office with an abstract that begins "The United States Capitol Preservation Commission receives commemorative coin surcharge funds authorized by the United States Capitol Visitor Center Commemorative Coin Act of 1999. Under the Omnibus Consolidated Appropriations Act of 1997 and the U.S. Mint's Compliance Procedures for Surcharge Eligibility, the commission must meet certain requirements before receiving available coin surcharge funds. The commission must provide the U.S. Mint with eligibility-related assertions associated with the commission's receipt and use of private matching funds, and an independent auditor must examine the assertions. GAO found that the assertion about the commission's receipt and use of private matching funds pursuant to the law and the U.S. Mint's Compliance Procedures for Surcharge Eligibility are fairly stated in all respects."
Date: December 12, 2001
Creator: United States. General Accounting Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Department of Justice's Activities to Address Past Election-Related Voting Irregularities

Description: Correspondence issued by the Government Accountability Office with an abstract that begins "Election-day problems in Florida and elsewhere in November 2000 raised concerns about voting systems that included, among other things, alleged voting irregularities that may have affected voter access to the polls. The term voting irregularities generally refers to a broad array of complaints relating to voting and/or elections that may involve violations of federal voting rights and/or federal criminal law for which the Department of Justice (DOJ) has enforcement responsibilities. The Ranking Minority Members of several Congressional committees requested that we review activities at DOJ to help ensure voter access to the polls and actions to address allegations of voting irregularities. This report (1) identifies and describes changes DOJ has made since November 2000 to help ensure voter access to the polls; (2) identifies and describes actions that the Voting Section in DOJ's Civil Rights Division has taken to track, address, and assess allegations of election-related voting irregularities received between November 2000 and December 2003; and (3) assesses the Voting Section's internal control activities to help ensure relevant, accurate, and reliable recording and documentation of allegations of voting irregularities to accurately track actions taken in response to allegations and provide accurate and complete information to the public and congressional committees."
Date: September 14, 2004
Creator: United States. Government Accountability Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Federal Judgeships: The General Accuracy of the Case-Related Workload Measures Used to Assess the Need for Additional District Court and Courts of Appeals Judgeships

Description: Correspondence issued by the General Accounting Office with an abstract that begins "Biennially, the Judicial Conference, the federal judiciary's principal policymaking body, assesses the judiciary's needs for additional judgeships. If the Conference determines that additional judgeships are needed, it transmits a request to Congress identifying the number, type (courts of appeals, district, or bankruptcy), and location of the judgeships it is requesting. In 2003, the Judicial Conference sent to Congress requests for 93 new judgeships--11 for the courts of appeals, 46 for the district courts, and 36 for the bankruptcy courts. In assessing the need for additional judgeships, the Judicial Conference considers a variety of information, including responses to its biennial survey of individual courts, temporary increases or decreases in case filings, and other factors specific to an individual court. However, the Judicial Conference's analysis begins with the courts of appeals--weighted case filings and adjusted case filings, respectively. These two measures recognize, to different degrees, that the time demands on judges are largely a function of both the number and complexity of the cases on their dockets. Some types of cases may demand relatively little time and others may require many hours of work. Generally, each case filed in a district court is assigned a weight representing the average amount of judge time the case is expected to require. Using these measures, individual courts whose past case-related workload meets the threshold established by the Judicial Conference may be considered for additional judgeships. Authorized judgeships are the total number of judgeships authorized by statute for each district court and court of appeals. The Judicial Conference relies on these quantitative workload measures to be reasonably accurate rests in turn on the soundness of the methodology used to develop them. Whether those measures are reasonably accurate rests in turn on the soundness of ...
Date: May 30, 2003
Creator: United States. General Accounting Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Information on Immigration Enforcement and Supervisory Promotions in the Department of Homeland Security's Immigration and Customs Enforcement and Customs and Border Protection

Description: Correspondence issued by the Government Accountability Office with an abstract that begins "After the creation of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) in March 2003, two legacy enforcement agencies--the former Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) and the U.S. Customs Service (USCS)--were among the 22 federal agencies brought together within DHS. This transformation in turn merged the legacy INS and USCS investigators into the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) Office of Investigations (OI), and legacy INS and USCS inspectors, among others, into Customs and Border Protection (CBP). It has been nearly 3 years since the merger and efforts to integrate thousands of federal employees within ICE and CBP continue. Congress raised questions about ongoing human capital challenges brought about by the integration of legacy enforcement employees within ICE and CBP. In prior work, we have reported on the management and human capital challenges DHS faces as it merges the workforces of legacy agencies, including the need to clarify the roles and responsibilities of the new agencies, the difficulty of legacy staff operating from separate locations, and how it decides to allocate investigative resources. This report addresses the following objectives: (1) How many investigative work years were dedicated to immigration enforcement activities for fiscal years 1999 through 2005? (2) What factors does ICE use as the basis for allocating its investigative resources? (3) What assessments do ICE and CBP use as a basis for making decisions on supervisory promotions? (4) Have ICE and CBP supervisory promotions been distributed between legacy INS and USCS staff in proportion to the supervisory staff each legacy agency brought to ICE and CBP?"
Date: June 13, 2006
Creator: United States. Government Accountability Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department