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Convention for the Protection of Plants : message from the President of the United States transmitting the International Convention for the Protection of New Varieties of Plants of December 2, 1961, as revised at Geneva on November 10, 1972, on October 23, 1978, and on March 19, 1991, and signed by the United States on October 25, 1991

Description: This treaty takes action to control the introduction and spread of pests of plants and plant products. The treaty protects natural as well as cultivated plants, so it has implications for agriculture as well as biodiversity. While the IPPC's primary focus is on plants and plant products moving in international trade, the convention also covers research materials, biological control organisms, and anything else that can act as a vector for the spread of plant pests including containers, soil, vehicles, and machinery.
Date: October 25, 1995
Creator: International Union for the Protection of New Varieties of Plants
Partner: UNT Libraries

The English Sparrow as a Pest

Description: "The English sparrow has many objectionable habits and few redeeming qualities and, as its general extermination is out of the question because of the necessary expense, its numbers should be reduced so far as possible. The chief aim of this bulletin is to describe the best methods of effecting this reduction of numbers. Trapping, wherever practicable, is recommended above all other methods, more particularly as English sparrows form an excellent and nutritious article of diet." -- p. 2
Date: 1912
Creator: Dearborn, Ned
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The English Sparrow as a Pest

Description: Revised edition. "The English sparrow defiles private and public property, fights and dispossesses useful native birds, replaces their songs with discordant sounds, and destroys fruit, grain, and garden truck.... The methods of ridding premises of English sparrows advocated in this bulletin have been used with success and can be relied upon if followed carefully and persistently. No one should undertake to kill these birds, however, unless able to distinguish them from native sparrows with absolute certainty. Otherwise some of the most valued songsters surely will be destroyed." -- p. 2
Date: 1917
Creator: Dearborn, Ned
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Asian Carp and the Great Lakes Region

Description: This report discusses four species of non-indigenous Asian carp that are expanding their range in U.S. waterways, resulting in a variety of concerns and problems. Three species--bighead, silver, and black carp--are of particular note, based on the perceived degree of environmental concern. Current controversy relates to what measures might be necessary and sufficient to prevent movement of Asian carp from the Mississippi River drainage into the Great Lakes through the Chicago Area Waterway System. Bills have been introduced in the 111th Congress to direct actions to avoid the possibility of carp becoming established in the Great Lakes.
Date: November 30, 2010
Creator: Buck, Eugene H.; Upton, Harold F.; Stern, Charles V. & Nichols, James E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Asian Carp and the Great Lakes Region

Description: Four species of non-indigenous Asian carp are expanding their range in U.S. waterways, resulting in a variety of concerns and problems. This report details the environmental and economic threats from this invasion, as well as ways to combat the spread of Asian carp in U.S. water.
Date: April 15, 2011
Creator: Buck, Eugene H.; Upton, Harold F.; Stern, Charles V. & Brown, Cynthia
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Impact of Chinese Privet (Ligustrum Sinense) on the Survival and Re-Establishment of Native Plants at the Dallas Floodway Extension

Description: Invasive woody shrubs are a problem when they displace native species and threaten habitats, especially those that harbor rare or endangered species. They not only compete with native plants, but also alter habitat and food that many organisms depend upon. Invasive plants undergo a release from their specialist predators in the nonnative range, providing them advantages over native species. Because modes and pathways of how invasive species spread are not fully understood, predicting spread and implementing restoration ecological controls remain inexact. Due to the lack of comparative studies on woody shrubs, especially invasive privets, we understand very little about conditions affecting their invasiveness. A study was conducted near Dallas, Texas to determine if privet has allelopathic properties that influences growth of native plants. Soil nutrients and other analyses were made and compared between field plots supporting privet, plots in which privet has been removed, and plots where privet has not been observed. In some field plots, natives were planted under the three previously mentioned conditions, and their survival and condition were monitored to evaluate effects of privet on their establishment and growth. It was found that Chinese privet did hinder seed germination in red mulberry, soapberry and beautyberry and root formation in beautyberry cuttings. The soil in the sites were found to be normal for bottomland forests that endured two flooding events within one year.
Date: August 2016
Creator: Barnett, Jennifer M
Partner: UNT Libraries

The National Invasive Species Council

Description: This website contains information about the purpose and work of the National Invasive Species Council, including its plans to prevent and manage invasive species, educational materials, budgetary and organizational documents of the Council, and other related resources.
Date: June 29, 2011
Creator: National Invasive Species Council (U.S.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

International Plant Protection Convention (IPPC) : message from the President of the United States transmitting International Plant Protection Convention (IPPC), adopted at the Conference of the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations at Rome on November 17, 1997.

Description: This treaty updates a previous international agreement aimed at promoting international cooperation to control and prevent the spread of harmful plant pests.
Date: 2000
Creator: United States. President (1993-2001 : Clinton) & Albright, Madeleine Korbel
Partner: UNT Libraries

Assessing Habitat Preference of Invasive American Minks (Neovison vison) Using Trap-Cameras in Navarino Island, Chile

Description: Poster presented at the 2013 Ecological Society of America (ESA) Annual Meeting. This poster discusses research on assessing habitat preference of invasive American minks (Neovison vison) using trap-cameras in Navarino Island, Chile.
Date: August 2013
Creator: Crego, Ramiro D. & Jiménez, Jaime E.
Partner: UNT College of Arts and Sciences

Invasive Species: State and Other Nonfederal Perspectives on Challenges to Managing the Problem

Description: Correspondence issued by the General Accounting Office with an abstract that begins "Invasive species--harmful, nonnative plants, animals, and microorganisms--are found throughout the United States and cause damage to crops, rangelands, waterways, and other ecosystems that is estimated to cost in the billions of dollars annually. In addition to their economic costs, invasive species can have a devastating effect on natural areas, where they have strangled native plants, taken over wetland habitats, crowded out native species, and deprived waterfowl and other species of food sources. Scientists, academicians, and industry leaders have all recognized invasive species as one of the most serious environmental threats of the twenty-first century. More specifically, conservation biologists ranked invasive species as the second most serious threat to endangered species after habitat destruction. In June 2003, GAO testified before the Senate Subcommittee on Fisheries, Wildlife, and Water concerning invasive species issues reported in our October 2002 report. We also provided testimony on the partial results of our spring 2003 survey of state agencies involved in efforts to address invasive species and members of the Invasive Species Advisory Committee (ISAC). This report provides the final results of our survey and focuses on state perspectives on (1) gaps in, or problems with, federal legislation addressing invasive species, (2) barriers to managing invasive species, (3) effective leadership structures for addressing invasive species, and (4) integrating federal aquatic and terrestrial invasive species legislation and the potential gains and drawbacks of such legislation."
Date: September 5, 2003
Creator: United States. General Accounting Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Invasive Species: Progress and Challenges in Preventing Introduction into U.S. Waters Via the Ballast Water in Ships

Description: Testimony issued by the Government Accountability Office with an abstract that begins "Numerous invasive species have been introduced into U.S. waters via ballast water discharged from ships and have caused serious economic and ecologic damage. GAO reported in 2002 that at least 160 nonnative aquatic species had become established in the Great Lakes since the 1800s--one-third of which were introduced in the past 30 years by ballast water and other sources. The effects of such species are not trivial; the zebra mussel alone is estimated to have caused $750 million to $1 billion in costs between 1989 and 2000. Species introductions via ballast water are not confined to the Great Lakes, however. The environment and economy of the Chesapeake Bay, San Francisco Bay, Puget Sound, and other U.S. waters have also been adversely affected. The federal government has been taking steps since 1990 to implement programs to prevent the introduction of invasive species from ships' ballast water discharges. However, species introductions are continuing. This testimony discusses the legislative and regulatory history of ballast water management and identifies some of the issues that pose challenges for the federal government's program for preventing the introduction of invasive species via ships' ballast water."
Date: September 9, 2005
Creator: United States. Government Accountability Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Invasive Species: Federal Efforts and State Perspectives on Challenges and National Leadership

Description: Testimony issued by the General Accounting Office with an abstract that begins "Invasive species--nonnative plants and animals--have caused billions of dollars in damage to natural areas, businesses, and consumers. In 2001, the federal government issued a National Management Plan to coordinate a national control effort involving the 20 or so federal agencies that are responsible for managing invasive species. In October 2002, GAO reported on the implementation of the management plan and efforts to manage ballast water, among other things. This testimony discusses some of GAO's findings and recommendations in that report. It also presents the results of a subsequent GAO survey of state officials responsible for managing terrestrial and aquatic invasive species. This survey sought state perspectives on (1) the perceived gaps in existing legislation and barriers to addressing terrestrial and aquatic invasive species and (2) the federal leadership structure for addressing invasive species, as well as the integration of federal legislation on terrestrial invasive species with legislation on aquatic invasives."
Date: June 17, 2003
Creator: United States. General Accounting Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

How to Destroy English Sparrows

Description: "Introduced into the United States many years ago from Europe, this sparrow has multiplied and extended its range until now it is numerous and firmly established over most of the country. The bad qualities of the bird far outweigh its good ones, and, although its extermination is impracticable, a reduction of its numbers is feasible and important. The present bulletin aims to describe the best methods of destruction." -- p. 2
Date: 1910
Creator: Dearborn, Ned, 1865-
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Potential niche expansion of the American mink invading a remote island free of nativepredatory mammals

Description: This article evaluates whether the lack of potential predators and competitors, together with a more diurnal and terrestrial prey, have resulted in the mink expanding its spatial and temporal niche on Navarino Island as compared to that in its native habitats,
Date: December 16, 2017
Creator: Crego, Ramiro D.; Jiménez, Jaime E. & Rozzi, Ricardo
Partner: UNT College of Arts and Sciences

Invasive Species: Cooperation and Coordination Are Important for Effective Management of Invasive Weeds

Description: A letter report issued by the Government Accountability Office with an abstract that begins "Invasive weeds, native or nonnative plant species, cause harm to natural areas such as rangelands or wildlife habitat and economic impacts due to lost productivity of these areas. While the federal investment in combating invasive species is substantial most has been concentrated on agricultural lands, not on natural areas. In this report, GAO describes (1) the entities that address invasive weeds in natural areas and the funding sources they use; (2) federal, state, and local weed management officials' views on the barriers to weed management; and (3) their opinions about how additional resources for weed management could be distributed. GAO limited this study to entities in the Departments of Agriculture and the Interior, and California, Colorado, Idaho, Maryland, and Mississippi, and gathered information through interviews of over 90 weed management officials."
Date: February 25, 2005
Creator: United States. Government Accountability Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The State of the Hudson 2009

Description: This report describes the environmental quality of the Hudson River and its watershed, including issues such as pollution, population growth, and biodiversity. The report also describes the habitats of estuaries, watersheds, and rivers in general.
Date: 2009
Creator: New York (State). Hudson River Estuary Program.
Partner: UNT Libraries