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Improper Payments: Moving Forward with Governmentwide Reduction Strategies

Description: Testimony issued by the Government Accountability Office with an abstract that begins "Federal agencies reported an estimated $115.3 billion in improper payments in fiscal year 2011, a decrease of $5.3 billion from the prior year reported estimate of $120.6 billion. The $115.3 billion estimate was attributable to 79 programs spread among 17 agencies. Ten programs accounted for about $107 billion or 93 percent of the total estimated improper payments agencies reported for fiscal year 2011. The reported decrease in fiscal year 2011 was primarily related to three programs—decreases in program outlays for the Department of Labor’s Unemployment Insurance program, and decreases in reported error rates for the Earned Income Tax Credit program and the Medicare Advantage program. Further, the Office of Management and Budget reported that agencies recaptured $1.25 billion in improper payments to contractors, vendors, and healthcare providers in fiscal year 2011. Over half of this amount, $797 million, can be attributed to the Medicare Recovery Audit Contractor program which identifies Medicare overpayments and underpayments."
Date: February 7, 2012
Creator: United States. Government Accountability Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Improper Payments: Responses to Posthearing Questions Related to Status of Agencies' Efforts to Address Improper Payment and Recovery Auditing Requirements

Description: Correspondence issued by the Government Accountability Office with an abstract that begins "On January 31, 2008, we testified before Congress' subcommittee at a hearing entitled, "Eliminating Agency Payment Errors." At the hearing, we discussed federal agencies' progress in addressing key requirements of the Improper Payments Information Act of 2002 (IPIA) and Section 831 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2002, commonly known as the Recovery Auditing Act. Our review and testimony focused on (1) progress made in agencies' implementation and reporting under IPIA for fiscal year 2007, (2) remaining challenges with IPIA implementation, and (3) agencies' efforts to report recovery auditing information. This report responds to your March 13, 2008, request to provide answers to follow-up questions relating to our January 31, 2008, testimony. (1) What kinds of changes should be made to the Single Audit Act, which already requires recipients to have proper systems of internal control to ensure front-end compliance with Federal requirements that would assist in identification and reduction of improper payments? The FY 2007 Audit Report on the Consolidated Financial Statement indicates that the Federal government's inability to determine the extent to which improper payments occur is one of the major government-wide material weaknesses that led to GAO's adverse opinion on internal control. (2) Did this compliance issue translate to reportable conditions or limitations in opinions on financial statements at the individual departments? Are CFO Act financial statement internal control and substantive audit tests of disbursements as stringent as they need to be? The expansion of government-wide systems for third party data matches across government programs sounds like an important program integrity improvement and potential cost savings initiative. (3) How can we ensure that all agencies across government are pursuing automated data checks across agencies and programs whose data they are reliant upon ...
Date: June 20, 2008
Creator: United States. Government Accountability Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Improper Payments: Posthearing Questions Related to Agencies Meeting the Requirements of the Improper Payments Information Act of 2002

Description: Correspondence issued by the Government Accountability Office with an abstract that begins "On March 9, 2006, we testified before Congress at a hearing entitled, "Reporting Improper Payments: A Report Card on Agencies' Progress." At the hearing, we discussed our findings on federal agencies' challenges in meeting the requirements of the Improper Payments Information Act (IPIA) of 2002 based on our review of agencies' fiscal year 2005 performance and accountability reports (PAR) and annual reports. We were asked to provide answers to the following follow-up questions relating to our March 9, 2006, testimony: (1) What concerns does GAO have regarding not only DHS' inability to comply with the Improper Payments Information Act; but on a greater scale with their overall financial management? (2) About which Agencies that reported in their fiscal year 2005 Performance and Accountability Report that they had no programs susceptible to significant improper payments does GAO have concerns about? (3) Should "unavoidable overpayment" statistics at the Social Security Administration (SSA) be reported to the Office of Management and Budget, and if so why would this be important, and how could the Social Security Administration implement such a process? (4) What concerns does GAO have with the Agency for International Development's (USAID) reporting on improper payments? (5) Does GAO have any concerns with the rest of these agencies and their failure to report improper payment information? (6) has GAO done any analysis of the President's proposals, and if so, what is the GAO's assessment? (7) Has GAO made any recommendations regarding the administration and financial controls in the EITC program? (8) How can the Department of Labor's successes be carried over to other agencies? and (9) Is GAO concerned that CDBG's outlays are $5.4 billion, and not only are they not reporting, they have claimed that they are in ...
Date: September 6, 2006
Creator: United States. Government Accountability Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Improper Payments: Responses to Posthearing Questions Related to Agencies' Progress in Addressing Improper Payment and Recovery Auditing Requirements

Description: Correspondence issued by the Government Accountability Office with an abstract that begins "On March 29, 2007, we testified before the Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs, Federal Financial Management, Government Information, Federal Services, and International Security Subcommittee at a hearing entitled, "Eliminating and Recovering Improper Payments." At the hearing, we discussed federal agencies' progress in addressing key requirements of the Improper Payments Information Act of 2002 (IPIA) and Section 831 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2002, commonly known as the Recovery Auditing Act. Our review and testimony focused on (1) trends in agencies' reporting under IPIA from fiscal years 2004 through 2006, (2) challenges in reporting improper payment information and improving internal control, and (3) agencies' reporting of recovery auditing efforts. This letter responds to Congress's April 18, 2007, request to provide answers to follow-up questions relating to our March 29, 2007, testimony. The responses are based on work associated with previously issued GAO products and data reported in agencies' performance and accountability reports (PAR)."
Date: May 30, 2007
Creator: United States. Government Accountability Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Improper Payments: Remaining Challenges and Strategies for Governmentwide Reduction Efforts

Description: Testimony issued by the Government Accountability Office with an abstract that begins "Federal agencies reported an estimated $115.3 billion in improper payments in fiscal year 2011, a decrease of $5.3 billion from the prior year reported estimate of $120.6 billion. According to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), the $115.3 billion estimate was attributable to 79 programs spread among 17 agencies. Ten programs accounted for about $107 billion or 93 percent of the total estimated improper payments agencies reported. The reported decrease in fiscal year 2011 was primarily related to 3 programs—decreases in program outlays for the Unemployment Insurance program, and decreases in reported error rates for the Earned Income Tax Credit program and the Medicare Advantage program. Further, OMB reported that agencies recaptured $1.25 billion in improper payments to contractors and vendors."
Date: March 28, 2012
Creator: United States. Government Accountability Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Improper Payments: Federal Executive Branch Agencies' Fiscal Year 2007 Improper Payment Estimate Reporting

Description: Correspondence issued by the Government Accountability Office with an abstract that begins "In the fourth year of implementation of the Improper Payments Information Act of 2002 (IPIA), major executive branch agencies reported a total improper payment estimate of about $55 billion for fiscal year 2007. This increase from the prior year estimate of $41 billion was primarily attributable to a component of the Medicaid program reporting improper payments for the first time totaling about $13 billion for fiscal year 2007. We view this increased reporting as a positive step to improve transparency over the full magnitude of improper payments across the federal government. As Congress requested, the objective of this report is to provide summary data and preliminary analysis of the improper payment estimates reported by federal executive branch agencies (federal agencies) in their fiscal year 2007 performance and accountability reports (PAR) or annual reports."
Date: January 23, 2008
Creator: United States. Government Accountability Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Improper Payments: Posthearing Responses on a December 5, 2006, Hearing to Assess the Improper Payments Information Act of 2002

Description: Correspondence issued by the Government Accountability Office with an abstract that begins "On December 5, 2006, we testified before the Senate Subcommittee on Federal Financial Management, Government Information, Federal Services, and International Security, Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs, at a hearing entitled, "An Assessment of Improper Payments Information Act of 2002." At the end of the hearing, Congress asked us to provide information regarding (1) barriers inhibiting agencies' efforts to prevent and reduce improper payments, (2) legislative reforms needed to facilitate agencies' efforts to prevent improper payments, and (3) suggested language to amend the Improper Payments Information Act of 2002 (IPIA) that would provide more complete disclosure and transparency of agencies' improper payments reporting."
Date: February 27, 2007
Creator: United States. Government Accountability Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Improper Payments: Agencies' Efforts to Address Improper Payment and Recovery Auditing Requirements Continue

Description: Testimony issued by the Government Accountability Office with an abstract that begins "The federal government is accountable for how its agencies and grantees spend hundreds of billions of taxpayer dollars and is responsible for safeguarding those funds against improper payments as well as for recouping those funds when improper payments occur. The Congress enacted the Improper Payments Information Act of 2002 (IPIA) and the Recovery Auditing Act to address these issues. Fiscal year 2006 marked the 3rd year that agencies were required to report improper payment and recovery audit information in their Performance and Accountability Reports. GAO was asked to testify on the progress agencies have made in these areas. Specifically, GAO focused on (1) trends in agencies' reporting under IPIA from fiscal years 2004 through 2006, (2) challenges in reporting improper payment information and improving internal control, and (3) agencies' reporting of recovery auditing efforts. This testimony is based on GAO's previous reports on agencies' efforts to implement IPIA requirements for fiscal years 2005 and 2004 and current review of available fiscal year 2006 improper payment and recovery auditing information. The Office of Management and Budget (OMB) provided technical comments that were incorporated as appropriate."
Date: March 29, 2007
Creator: United States. Government Accountability Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Improper Payments: Progress Made but Challenges Remain in Estimating and Reducing Improper Payments

Description: Testimony issued by the Government Accountability Office with an abstract that begins "GAO's work over the past several years has demonstrated that improper payments are a long-standing, widespread, and significant problem in the federal government. The Improper Payments Information Act of 2002 (IPIA) has increased visibility over improper payments by requiring executive branch agency heads, using guidance from the Office of Management and Budget, to identify programs and activities susceptible to significant improper payments, estimate amounts improperly paid, and report on the amounts of improper payments and their actions to reduce them. This testimony addresses (1) progress made in agencies' implementation of IPIA for fiscal year 2008, and (2) several major challenges that continue to hinder full reporting of IPIA information. GAO was also asked to provide an overview of Medicare and Medicaid programs' implementation of IPIA. This testimony is based primarily on GAO products, Office of Inspector General (OIG) audit reports, and agencies' fiscal year 2008 reported improper payment information, including information reported by the Department of Health and Human Service's (HHS) Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). GAO also analyzed fiscal year 2008 governmentwide improper payment information to identify trends and reviewed Medicare and Medicaid programs' reported actions to identify, estimate, and reduce improper payments."
Date: April 22, 2009
Creator: United States. Government Accountability Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Improper Payments: Recent Efforts to Address Improper Payments and Remaining Challenges

Description: Testimony issued by the Government Accountability Office with an abstract that begins "GAO's work over the past several years has highlighted long-standing, widespread, and significant problems with improper payments in the federal government. Fiscal year 2010 marked the 7th year of implementation of the Improper Payments Information Act of 2002 (IPIA). IPIA requires executive-branch agencies to identify programs and activities susceptible to significant improper payments, estimate annual amounts improperly paid, and report these estimates and actions taken to reduce them. On July 22, 2010, the Improper Payments Elimination and Recovery Act of 2010 (IPERA) was enacted. IPERA amended IPIA and expanded requirements for recovering overpayments across a broad range of federal programs. This testimony addresses (1) progress federal agencies have reported in estimating and reducing improper payments in fiscal year 2010, (2) challenges that continue to hinder full reporting of improper payment information, and (3) recent efforts by Congress and the executive branch intended to improve transparency and accountability for reporting, reducing, and recovering improper payments. This testimony is primarily based on prior GAO reports. GAO summarized available fiscal year 2010 improper payment information reported by federal executive-branch agencies and actions taken by the executive branch and Congress intended to improve transparency over, accountability for, and reduction of improper payments."
Date: April 15, 2011
Creator: United States. Government Accountability Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Improper Payments: Incomplete Reporting under the Improper Payments Information Act Masks the Extent of the Problem

Description: Testimony issued by the Government Accountability Office with an abstract that begins "Fiscal year 2005 marked the second year that executive agencies were required to report improper payment information under the Improper Payments Information Act of 2002 (IPIA). The ultimate goal is to minimize such payments because, as a practical matter, they cannot be entirely eliminated. GAO's testimony is primarily based on its recently issued report, GAO-07-92, which included a review of improper payment information reported by 35 agencies in their fiscal year 2005 performance and accountability or annual reports. This statement focuses on the progress agencies have made in their improper payment reporting, the challenges that remain, and the total amount of improper payments recouped through recovery auditing."
Date: December 5, 2006
Creator: United States. Government Accountability Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Improper Payments: Status of Agencies' Efforts to Address Improper Payment and Recovery Auditing Requirements

Description: Testimony issued by the Government Accountability Office with an abstract that begins "The federal government is accountable for how its agencies and grantees spend hundreds of billions of taxpayer dollars and is responsible for safeguarding those funds against improper payments and recouping those funds when improper payments occur. The Congress enacted the Improper Payments Information Act of 2002 (IPIA) and section 831 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2002, commonly known as the Recovery Auditing Act, to address these issues. GAO was asked to testify on agencies' efforts to eliminate and recover improper payments. Specifically, GAO focused on (1) progress made in agencies' implementation and reporting under IPIA for fiscal year 2007, (2) major challenges that continue to hinder full reporting of improper payment information, and (3) agencies' efforts to report on recovery auditing and recoup contract overpayments. This testimony is based in part on a recently issued report (GAO-08-377R) in addition to a further review and analysis of improper payment and recovery auditing information reported in agencies' fiscal year 2007 performance and accountability reports (PAR) or annual reports. The Office of Management and Budget (OMB) provided technical comments which GAO incorporated as appropriate."
Date: January 31, 2008
Creator: United States. Government Accountability Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Improper Payments: Significant Improvements Needed in DOD's Efforts to Address Improper Payment and Recovery Auditing Requirements

Description: A letter report issued by the Government Accountability Office with an abstract that begins "The Department of Defense (DOD) is required, as are other federal executive agencies, to report improper payment information under the Improper Payments Information Act of 2002 (IPIA) and recovery auditing information under section 831 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2002, commonly known as the Recovery Auditing Act. The DOD Office of Inspector General has previously reported deficiencies at DOD related to these acts and GAO's prior work on DOD's reporting of its fiscal year 2006 travel improper payments estimate also identified shortcomings. Because of these and other long-standing weaknesses, the subcommittee asked GAO to examine DOD's fiscal year 2007 improper payment and recovery audit reporting to determine whether adequate processes existed to address both statutory requirements. To complete this work, GAO reviewed DOD's annual reports, conducted site visits, and met with cognizant DOD officials."
Date: July 29, 2009
Creator: United States. Government Accountability Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Strategies to Manage Improper Payments: Learning From Public and Private Sector Organizations (Exposure Draft) (Superseded by GAO-02-69G)

Description: Guidance issued by the General Accounting Office with an abstract that begins "This publication has been superseded by GAO-02-69G, Strategies to Manage Improper Payments: Learning From Public and Private Sector Organizations, October 2001. This executive guide is intended to identify effective practices and provide case illustrations and other information for federal agencies' consideration when developing strategies and planning and implementing actions to manage improper payments in their programs."
Date: May 1, 2001
Creator: United States. General Accounting Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Improper Payments: Federal and State Coordination Needed to Report National Improper Payment Estimates on Federal Programs

Description: A letter report issued by the Government Accountability Office with an abstract that begins "Over the past several years, GAO has reported that federal agencies are not well positioned to meet requirements of the Improper Payments Information Act of 2002 (IPIA). For fiscal year 2005, estimated improper payments exceeded $38 billion but did not include some of the highest risk programs, such as Medicaid with outlays exceeding $181 billion for fiscal year 2005. Overall, state-administered programs and other nonfederal entities receive over $400 billion annually in federal funds. Thus, federal agencies and states share responsibility for the prudent use of these funds. GAO was asked to determine actions taken at the state level to help federal agencies estimate improper payments for state-administered federal programs and assistance needed from the federal level to support the respective federal agencies' implementation of IPIA."
Date: April 14, 2006
Creator: United States. Government Accountability Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Improper Payments: Agencies' Fiscal Year 2005 Reporting under the Improper Payments Information Act Remains Incomplete

Description: A letter report issued by the Government Accountability Office with an abstract that begins "Fiscal year 2005 marked the second year that executive agencies were required to report improper payment information under the Improper Payments Information Act of 2002 (IPIA). As a steward of taxpayer dollars, the federal government is accountable for how its agencies and grantees spend billions of taxpayer dollars and is responsible for safeguarding those funds against improper payments. GAO was asked to determine the progress agencies have made in their improper payment reporting and the total amount of improper payments recouped through recovery auditing. To accomplish this, GAO reviewed improper payment information reported by 35 agencies in their fiscal year 2005 performance and accountability or annual reports."
Date: November 14, 2006
Creator: United States. Government Accountability Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Strategies to Manage Improper Payments: Learning From Public and Private Sector Organizations (Supersedes GAO-01-703G)

Description: Guidance issued by the General Accounting Office with an abstract that begins "This publication supersedes GAO-01-703G, Strategies to Manage Improper Payments: Learning From Public and Private Sector Organizations (Exposure Draft), May 2001. Improper payments are a significant problem in both government and the private sector. In the private sector, improper payments are generally an internal problem that threatens profitability. In the public sector, improper payments can result in wasteful spending, a higher tax burden, and fewer people receiving services. Despite increased scrutiny, most improper payments associated with federal programs still go undetected. Improper payments are more likely in programs with complex criteria for computing payments, a high volume of transactions, or an emphasis on speedy payments. This report highlights strategic actions taken by study participants to reduce improper payments."
Date: October 1, 2001
Creator: United States. General Accounting Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Improper Payments: Responses to Posthearing Questions Related to Eliminating Waste and Fraud in Medicare and Medicaid

Description: Correspondence issued by the Government Accountability Office with an abstract that begins "On April 22, 2009, GAO testified before the subcommittee at a hearing entitled, "Eliminating Waste and Fraud in Medicare and Medicaid." This letter responds to a May 29, 2009, request for responses to questions for the record related to our April 22, 2009, testimony. The questions are as follows: (1) What do you see as the biggest challenge for CMS to provide an estimate for improper payments under Medicare Part D? (2) Has GAO identified any problems with the current process for reviewing and paying Medicare claims that would make the program more vulnerable to fraudulent claims? (3) Is there any reason CMS cannot include penalties in its Medicare Administrative Contractor contracts for paying improper or fraudulent claims that you are aware of?"
Date: July 20, 2009
Creator: United States. Government Accountability Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Improper Payments: Weaknesses in USAID's and NASA's Implementation of the Improper Payments Information Act and Recovery Auditing

Description: A letter report issued by the Government Accountability Office with an abstract that begins "Agencies are required to report improper payment information under the Improper Payments Information Act of 2002 (IPIA) and recovery auditing information under section 831 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2002, commonly known as the Recovery Auditing Act. Since the first year of implementation, fiscal year 2004, limited improper payments reporting by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and concerns raised by NASA's auditors about its risk assessment process prompted scrutiny from the Senate Subcommittee on Federal Financial Management, Government Information, Federal Services, and International Security, during several oversight hearings. Because the subcommittee noted that USAID's and NASA's performance and accountability report (PAR) reporting on improper payments and recovery auditing was minimal, GAO was asked to review both agencies' IPIA risk assessment methodologies, recovery auditing procedures, and actions under way to improve their IPIA and recovery audit reporting."
Date: November 9, 2007
Creator: United States. Government Accountability Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Improper Payments Information Act of 2002: Department of Defense Travel Expenditure Reporting

Description: Correspondence issued by the Government Accountability Office with an abstract that begins "In November 2002, the Congress passed the Improper Payments Information Act of 2002 (IPIA). The major objective of the legislation was to enhance the accuracy and integrity of federal payments. This legislation, in conjunction with implementing guidance from the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), requires executive branch agency heads to review their programs and activities annually, identify those that may be susceptible to significant improper payments, estimate amounts improperly paid, and report on the amounts of improper payments and actions to reduce them. Since passage of IPIA, the Department of Defense (DOD) has continued to expand its annual disclosures in its performance and accountability reports (PAR) and currently discloses some detail of improper payment estimates for six programs or activities, including civilian pay, commercial pay, travel pay, military retirement, military health benefits, and military pay. DOD has reported improper payment information since 2003. The Congress mandated that we consider one facet of this reporting related to DOD--travel pay. The DOD Office of the Inspector General (OIG) first reported on whether the department complied with IPIA in fiscal year 2006 and identified several significant flaws in DOD's efforts to comply with IPIA. Over the past several years, GAO has issued numerous reports that highlighted problems with DOD travel practices that resulted in wasteful spending of millions of dollars, including weak controls over first class travel, unused airline tickets, and the accuracy of travelers' claims. Conference Report 109-676 accompanying the Department of Defense Appropriations Act, 2007 included a requirement for GAO to assess the reasons why DOD is not fully in compliance with IPIA related to travel expenditures and make any needed recommendations for corrective action. In response, this initial report provides an overview of DOD's IPIA reporting for ...
Date: May 31, 2007
Creator: United States. Government Accountability Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Medicare Improper Payments: While Enhancements Hold Promise for Measuring Potential Fraud and Abuse, Challenges Remain

Description: A letter report issued by the General Accounting Office with an abstract that begins "Pursuant to a congressional request, GAO provided information on the structural problems that exist in the Medicare claims processing system, focusing on: (1) what the Health Care Financing Administration (HCFA) proposals have been designed or initiated to measure Medicare improper payments; and (2) the status of these proposals and initiatives and how will they enhance HCFA's ability to comprehensively measure improper Medicare payments and the frequency of kickbacks, false claims, and other inappropriate provider practices."
Date: September 15, 2000
Creator: United States. General Accounting Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Improper Payments: Reported Medicare Estimates and Key Remediation Strategies

Description: Testimony issued by the Government Accountability Office with an abstract that begins "GAO has designated Medicare as a high-risk program because of its size, complexity, and susceptibility to improper payments. In 2010, Medicare covered 47 million elderly and disabled beneficiaries and had estimated outlays of $516 billion. The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) is the agency in the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) responsible for administering the Medicare program and leading efforts to reduce Medicare improper payments. This testimony focuses on estimated improper payments in the Medicare program for fiscal year 2010 and the status of CMS's efforts to implement key strategies to help reduce improper payments. This testimony is primarily based on previous GAO reporting related to governmentwide improper payments, Medicare high-risk challenges and program integrity efforts, and CMS's information technology systems intended to identify improper payments. GAO supplemented that prior work with additional information on the nature and extent of Medicare improper payments reported by HHS in its fiscal year 2010 agency financial report. GAO also received updated information from CMS in February 2011 and, in select cases, as of July 2011, on its actions related to relevant laws, regulations, guidance, and open recommendations pertaining to key remediation strategies."
Date: July 28, 2011
Creator: United States. Government Accountability Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Medicare Improper Payments: Challenges for Measuring Potential Fraud and Abuse Remain Despite Planned Enhancements

Description: Testimony issued by the General Accounting Office with an abstract that begins "Pursuant to a congressional request, GAO discussed the Health Care Financing Administration's (HCFA) efforts to improve the measurement of improper payments in the Medicare fee-for-service program."
Date: July 12, 2000
Creator: United States. General Accounting Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

DOD Travel Improper Payments: Fiscal Year 2006 Reporting Was Incomplete and Planned Improvement Efforts Face Challenges

Description: A letter report issued by the Government Accountability Office with an abstract that begins "Fiscal year 2006 was the first year that the Department of Defense (DOD) reported improper payment information for its travel program under the Improper Payments Information Act of 2002 (IPIA). For fiscal year 2006, DOD reported obligations of approximately $8.5 billion for travel. Congress mandated that GAO assess the reasons why DOD is not fully in compliance with IPIA related to travel expenditures. In May 2007, GAO issued an initial report in response to this mandate. To further respond, GAO assessed (1) the completeness and accuracy of DOD's fiscal year 2006 IPIA travel disclosure in its performance and accountability report (PAR), and (2) DOD's planned efforts to improve and refine its processes for estimating and reporting on travel improper payments. To complete this work, GAO reviewed DOD's IPIA reporting, IPIA, Office of Management and Budget's (OMB) IPIA implementing guidance, and met with cognizant DOD officials."
Date: December 14, 2007
Creator: United States. Government Accountability Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department