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The Preparation of Academic Library Administrators

Description: The purpose of this quantitative study was to determine the preparation methods experienced by academic library deans and which methods they perceived to be most valuable. Rosser, Johnsrud, and Heck (2000, 2003) defined the theoretical constructs of effective academic leadership upon which this study is based. The instrument—a modified version of Greicar's (2009) Professional Preparation of Academic Deans Questionnaire—was administered online. The population was the chief administrators of academic libraries in the United States; there were 749 usable responses for a 30.4% response rate. Respondents were primarily female (61.7%), White non-Hispanic (90.0%), and born in the United States (95.7%), with a mean age of 56.4 (5.9% < 40, 11.0% > 65). The largest minority group was Black, non-Hispanic (3.9%). Many respondents held multiple advanced degrees; 90.0% held an MLS, 45.8% held a subject master's, and 18.8% held a doctorate. The instrument measured academic library deans' perceived value of various preparatory methods (formal and informal mentoring, on the job training, conferences or seminars, advanced degrees beyond the MLS, and training programs). The methods were tested for perceived effectiveness with Rosser, Johnsrud, and Heck's (2000, 2003) theoretical constructs of academic leadership. Each preparation method was measured using eight item-level variables and summed to create a scale. Parametric analyses were used to examine scale-level variables and nonparametric analyses to evaluate item-level variables. On the job training was both the most commonly-experienced method (86.6%) and the most highly-valued (M = 24.97). Mentoring was a particularly important preparation method for female and minority deans. Female deans perceived informal mentoring to be significantly more valuable than did males, t(447) = -2.12, p < .05. Minorities rated formal and informal mentoring significantly higher than did non-minorities, t(114) = 2.73, p < .05; t(441) = 3.05, p < .05. Practical implications and future research are discussed.
Date: December 2012
Creator: Hoffman, Starr
Partner: UNT Libraries

Women in Higher Education Administration: An Analysis for 1983-1998

Description: The objective of this study was to identify if women have made statistically significant increases as top-level administrators in institutions of higher education during the period 1983-98. The research focused on the following areas: (1) Have women made significant increases as administrators during 1983-98? (2) Have women made significant increases in their proportion of total administrators during 1983-98 in the following areas: (a) comprehensive institutions, (b) doctoral institutions, (c) liberal arts institutions, and (d) research institutions? (3) Has the proportion of women administrators in private institutions increased significantly more than the proportion of women administrators in public institutions for 1983-98?
Date: August 1998
Creator: Muskopf, Sandra Jane
Partner: UNT Libraries

An analysis of the role of women in Texas Baptist higher education administration

Description: This study addressed the role of women in higher education administration in the eight Baptist universities in Texas. The purposes of this study were to examine the standards and practices of general administration as viewed by administrators within Baptist higher education and to analyze the influences upon the role of women in administration in the eight Texas Baptist universities.
Date: December 1990
Creator: Ward, Linda Gail
Partner: UNT Libraries

An Analysis of the Dartmouth College Case with Respect to Its Impact Upon the Evolution of Higher Education

Description: The problem with which this study is concerned is that of determining the effect of the Dartmouth College case on the evolution of higher education. The purpose of the study is to investigate the impact of the Dartmouth College decision upon the evolution of higher education by (1) the investigation of the historical sequence of events leading up to the decision, (2) the study of the legal proceedings as they led to the actual decision in 1819, (3) the inspection of subsequent court decisions involving higher education which have cited the Dartmouth case as a point of reference, and (4) the organization of this information into an analysis of impact to show the probable effect upon higher education.
Date: December 1973
Creator: Filkins, James Heasom
Partner: UNT Libraries