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Market Hay.

Description: "The purpose of this bulletin is to supply information to hay producers concerning the conditions existing in the various hay markets of the country. The here given are applicable to all hay-growing sections of the United States." -- p. 2. Topics discussed include hay baling, hay presses, and shipping.
Date: 1912
Creator: McClure, H. B. (Harry B.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Growing Hay in the South for Market

Description: This report discusses the challenges of growing hay in the southern United States and practices farmers can use to successfully grow their own hay crops there. Details specific crops for hay production.
Date: 1915
Creator: Piper, Charles V. (Charles Vancouver), 1867-1926; McClure, H. B. (Harry B.) & Carrier, Lyman
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Baling Hay

Description: "This bulletin aims to help the hay grower solve some of the problems that arise in connection with baling hay; to decide whether to buy a press or depend on custom balers, to select the type of press best suited to his needs if hey buys, and to settle to best advantage questions in farm practice that determine efficiency in the settling and operation of a hay press." -- p. 2
Date: 1919
Creator: McClure, H. B. (Harry B.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Rhodes Grass

Description: "Rhodes grass was introduced from southern Africa in 1902, and has proved of value for cultivation in the warmer parts of the United States, being grown more largely in Florida and Texas than elsewhere.... It makes a heavy yield of hay of excellent quality, as the stems are slender, tender, and very leafy. The hay is cured easily and is relished by all kinds of live stock.... This bulletin mentions the soil preferences of this grass and gives the methods of seeding and after-treatment employed as well as handling the hay and pasturing and seed saving." -- p. 2
Date: 1919
Creator: Tracy, S. M. (Samuel Mills), 1847-1920
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Rhodes Grass

Description: Revised edition. "Rhodes grass was introduced from southern Africa in 1902, and has proved of value for cultivation in the warmer parts of the United States, being grown more largely in Florida and Texas than elsewhere.... It makes a heavy yield of hay of excellent quality, as the stems are slender, tender, and very leafy. The hay is cured easily and is relished by all kinds of live stock.... This bulletin mentions the soil preferences of this grass and gives the methods of seeding and after-treatment employed as well as handling the hay and pasturing and seed saving." -- p. 2
Date: 1922
Creator: Tracy, S. M. (Samuel Mills), 1847-1920
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Sudan Grass as a Forage Crop

Description: Report discussing Sudan grass and its potential for use as hay in the southern United States, if inefficient planting practices are abandoned. Best planting practices are discussed.
Date: 1914
Creator: Vinall, H. N. (Harry Nelson), 1880-1937
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Reed canary grass.

Description: Provides methods for growing reed canary grass and describes its uses for hay and pasturage.
Date: 1940
Creator: Schoth, H. A. (Harry August), b. 1891
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Alfalfa on Corn-Belt Farms

Description: "Alfalfa, on Corn Belt farms, if introduced in any considerable acreage, requires a great amount of labor at the most critical stage of the cultivation of corn. This bulletin tells how the more successful Corn Belt growers fit alfalfa into their cropping systems without interfering seriously with labor schedules. This is done in the main by speeding up the haying operations and corn cultivation by the use of labor-saving implements and more efficient methods. To some extent, the use of alfalfa for pasture serves to reduce the labor difficulties. The methods of handling the alfalfa crop that have been worked out by some of the more experienced Corn Belt growers are illustrated by several concrete examples of good management. The material for this bulletin was obtained on 235 Corn Belt farms on which alfalfa is grown successfully." -- p. 2
Date: 1919
Creator: Drake, J. A.; Rundles, J. C. & Jennings, R. D. (Ralph Dickieson), 1892-
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Timothy

Description: "Timothy, usually seeded in mixture with clover, is grown in rotations with other crops on most of the farms in the northeastern fourth of the United States. Timothy is usually seeded with some grain as a nurse crop. Winter wheat and rye are generally better nurse crops than oats or other spring grains. Timothy seeded alone in late August or early September will produce a crop of clear timothy hay the following season. Fertilizers applied on corn, wheat, or other crops grown in rotation with timothy increase the following hay crops. Farm manure or nitrate of soda applied as a top-dressing on meadow is very effective in increasing the yields of timothy. As a rule, timothy should be harvested for hay after the plants have passed out of full bloom and before any of the heads on the earliest plants have begun to turn brown and before the seed has begun to mature." -- p. 2
Date: 1918
Creator: Evans, Morgan W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Canada Bluegrass: Its Culture and Uses

Description: "The increasing realization of the agricultural value of Canada bluegrass has resulted in a demand for information regarding its habits, uses, and culture. This paper is intended to contain an agronomic discussion of this grass, embodying a description of the methods of culture and utilization now followed, and also some suggestions resulting from experiments conducted by the Bureau of Plant Industry." -- p. 2
Date: 1910
Creator: Oakley, R. A. (Russell Arthur)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

[Junebug in Grandpa's Barn]

Description: Photograph of a boy, Junebug Clark, hiding behind some haystacks in his grandfather's barn with a poem about hiding places is mounted next to it. In the image, the boy is hiding in the shadows looking away from the camera. Narrative by Junebug Clark: Grandpa's Barn. To Grandpa's barn - I'll run and race - To my secret - hiding place - hbss. Photo by: Joe Clark, HBSS. Signed by: Joe Clark, HBSS
Date: 195u
Creator: Clark, Joe
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[Otto Walker and his father stacking hay]

Description: Photograph of Otto Walker helping his father stacking piles of hay. In the image, the young Walker stands on the top of the pile ready to pull the hay with a pitchfork from his father, Mr. Walker, holds up a pitchfork from the ground.
Date: unknown
Creator: Clark, Joe
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

Haymaking

Description: "Haymaking is an operation that must be done in a certain space of time that is short at best and that is always liable to be made shorter by bad weather. For this reason there is perhaps no farm operation in which system and efficiency count for more than in haymaking; yet throughout the hay-growing area more or less haphazard methods of haymaking are still very common. This bulletin is designed to point out ways in which the more successful hay growers of the country save time and labor in this important field work. It tells how the growing scarcity of farm labor may be met by rearranging crews and changing methods, and by the adoption of up-to-date implements, such as the hay loader, push rake, and stacker. In addition to outlines of methods for various sized crews and acreages the bulletin presents, briefly, a discussion of the theory of curing hay, a thorough understanding of which is a great help in planning an efficient method of haymaking." -- p. 2
Date: 1918
Creator: McClure, H. B. (Harry B.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Hay Caps

Description: "Hay caps can be used to advantage to keep rain from wetting hay in cocks on many farms in the eastern half of the United States." -- p. 2. This bulletin describes the different types of hay camps, estimates their cost, and explains how hay caps may be used.
Date: 1918
Creator: McClure, H. B. (Harry B.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Cowpeas

Description: "The cowpea is the most valuable legume for the Southern States and its use would be much more extensive were it not for the relatively high price of the seed, most of which is still picked by hand. Particular attention is therefore given to the matter of harvesting seed by machinery now in very successful use in several communities. These methods are so far perfected that the cowpea seed crop should receive much greater attention in favorable localities." -- p. 5. This bulletin also discusses the use of cowpeas for hay, seed mixtures of cowpeas and other crops, the nutritional value of cowpeas in animal feeds, growing practices, and the several different varieties of cowpea.
Date: 1908
Creator: Nielsen, H. T. (Harold T.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Alfalfa Growing

Description: Report discussing the cultivation of alfalfa and its potential as a crop for hay and pastures. Also includes a discussion of the various weeds, pests, and fungi which affect alfalfa.
Date: 1905
Creator: Hitchcock, A. S. (Albert Spear), 1865-1935
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Bermuda Grass

Description: Bermuda grass is the most important perennial grass in the Southern States. It was introduced into the United States at least as early as 1806. Besides the common Bermuda grass, there are several varieties, the most important of which are the Giant, characterized by a very large growth, and St. Lucie grass, similar to ordinary Bermuda grass, but lacking underground rootstocks. Bermuda grass grows well mixed with lespedeza for a summer crop. Bur clover, black medic, and hairy vetch as winter crops alternate well with it. The best Bermuda-grass pastures of the South will usually carry two head of cattle per acre for eight months of the year. On poor soils the carrying capacity is not more than one cow per acre. On rich bottom land Bermuda grass grows tall enough to cut for hay. Under exceptional circumstances three or more cuttings may be secured in a season, giving total yields of from 6 to 10 tons of hay per acre. It will grow well on soils so alkaline that most other field crops, as well as fruits, will fail. The feeding value of Bermuda-grass hay compares closely wit that of timothy hay. Bermuda grass frequently is used to bind leaves and toe prevent hillsides from washing. The grass usually can be eradicated by growing two smother crops, a winter one of oats or rye, followed by a summer crop of cow peas or velvet beans." -- p. 2
Date: 1917
Creator: Tracy, S. M. (Samuel Mills), 1847-1920
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department