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Parent Responses to the Birth and Rearing of a Child with Down Syndrome : The Application of Engel's 3-stage Theoretical Model of Grieving

Description: The purpose of this study was twofold: 1) To analyze the similarities and differences between parent responses to the birth and rearing of a child with Down syndrome and; 2) To document the characteristics of grieving described in Engel's 3-stage model of grieving. A questionnaire was used to assess responses from randomly chosen parent members of the Dallas Down Syndrome Guild. Qualitative data analysis was conducted, using the methodology of triangulation.
Date: August 1995
Creator: Smith, Jenette L.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Brief Report: Induced After-Death Communication: An Update

Description: Abstract: Seventy-one clients (50 females, 21 males) who were treated with Induced After-Death Communication (IADC) therapy completed the author-developed Grief Symptom Questionnaire (GSQ) before and after the two-session treatment protocol and at six months post-treatment. Factor analyses revealed three factors - Depression, Anger, and Positive Coping - underlying nine GSQ items. Seventy-nine percent of the sample reported experiencing an IADC during treatment - an experience of communication with a deceased loved one they were grieving. In comparison with pre-treatment, at post-treatment participants reported statistically significant improvements in their grief symptoms, an increase in belief in an afterlife, an improvement in Positive Coping, and decreased Anger and Depression. Implications of the findings and methodological limitations are discussed.
Date: Summer 2013
Creator: Hannah, Mo Therese; Botkin, Allan L.; Marrone, Joseph G. & Streit-Horn, Jenny
Partner: UNT Libraries

Brief Report: Psychotherapeutic Outcomes Reported by Therapists Trained in Induced After-Death Communication

Description: Abstract: Induced after-death communication (IADC) is a new psychotherapeutic procedure based on a variation of eye-movement desensitization and re-processing (EMDR). Psychologist Allan Botkin discovered it accidentally in 1995 while he was conducting therapy with combat veterans suffering from grief and post-traumatic stress disorder. During the course of the IADC treatment, Botkin's patients reported experiencing what they believed to be communications from a deceased person. The psychological healing associated with these experiences seemed remarkable. The following report presents the results of a survey Botkin conducted with other therapists he personally trained to conduct IADC. The results indicate that other IADC therapists achieved successful results nearly identical to those of Botkin and that the results were consistent across trained therapists.
Date: Summer 2013
Creator: Botkin, Allan L. & Hannah, Mo Therese
Partner: UNT Libraries

Brief Report: Phenomenology of Near-Death Experiences: An Analysis of a Maori Case Study

Description: Abstract: Near-death experiences (NDEs) have been recorded in the oral and written histories of virtually every culture since antiquity. Based on some of theses accounts, attempts have been made to investigate whether the phenomenology of the NDE is cross-culturally variable or similar. The present article contributes to this literature by analyzing the only known historical account of an NDE reported by a Maori individual. Although this account has been previously analyzed for its association with features typically reported in Western NDE accounts, it has been analyzed for its conformity to prevailing Maori beliefs about the afterlife. The analysis of this single case study suggests the NDE was influenced by cultural beliefs, which supports two converging viewpoint: that NDE phenomenology is universal but expressed in culturally-relative ways and that NDE phenomenology is culture-bound.
Date: Winter 2013
Creator: Tassell-Matamua, Natasha
Partner: UNT Libraries