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Huron Timothy.

Description: Describes the Huron variety of timothy-grass, where and how it grows, and provides recommendations for cultivation.
Date: August 1933
Creator: Evans, Morgan W. (Morgan William), 1879-
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Bermuda Grass

Description: Bermuda grass is the most important perennial grass in the Southern States. It was introduced into the United States at least as early as 1806. Besides the common Bermuda grass, there are several varieties, the most important of which are the Giant, characterized by a very large growth, and St. Lucie grass, similar to ordinary Bermuda grass, but lacking underground rootstocks. Bermuda grass grows well mixed with lespedeza for a summer crop. Bur clover, black medic, and hairy vetch as winter crops alternate well with it. The best Bermuda-grass pastures of the South will usually carry two head of cattle per acre for eight months of the year. On poor soils the carrying capacity is not more than one cow per acre. On rich bottom land Bermuda grass grows tall enough to cut for hay. Under exceptional circumstances three or more cuttings may be secured in a season, giving total yields of from 6 to 10 tons of hay per acre. It will grow well on soils so alkaline that most other field crops, as well as fruits, will fail. The feeding value of Bermuda-grass hay compares closely wit that of timothy hay. Bermuda grass frequently is used to bind leaves and toe prevent hillsides from washing. The grass usually can be eradicated by growing two smother crops, a winter one of oats or rye, followed by a summer crop of cow peas or velvet beans." -- p. 2
Date: 1917
Creator: Tracy, S. M. (Samuel Mills), 1847-1920
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Sudan Grass as a Forage Crop

Description: Report discussing Sudan grass and its potential for use as hay in the southern United States, if inefficient planting practices are abandoned. Best planting practices are discussed.
Date: 1914
Creator: Vinall, H. N. (Harry Nelson), 1880-1937
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Carpet Grass

Description: Report discussing carpet grass, which is an unappreciated but highly valuable grass that grows in permanent pastures on sandy soils, especially in the Coastal Plain of the southern United States. Discussion focuses on growing conditions and pasture practices.
Date: 1920
Creator: Piper, Charles V. (Charles Vancouver), 1867-1926
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

[Loft shed]

Description: Photograph of a loft shed in Lund, Sweden. The loft is visible in the foreground backed by trees. The shed is constructed of wooden logs and a grass roof.
Date: June 8, 1960
Creator: Gough, Ray
Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design

Timothy

Description: "Timothy, usually seeded in mixture with clover, is grown in rotations with other crops on most of the farms in the northeastern fourth of the United States. Timothy is usually seeded with some grain as a nurse crop. Winter wheat and rye are generally better nurse crops than oats or other spring grains. Timothy seeded alone in late August or early September will produce a crop of clear timothy hay the following season. Fertilizers applied on corn, wheat, or other crops grown in rotation with timothy increase the following hay crops. Farm manure or nitrate of soda applied as a top-dressing on meadow is very effective in increasing the yields of timothy. As a rule, timothy should be harvested for hay after the plants have passed out of full bloom and before any of the heads on the earliest plants have begun to turn brown and before the seed has begun to mature." -- p. 2
Date: 1918
Creator: Evans, Morgan W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Quackgrass

Description: "Quackgrass or witchgrass is a creeping perennial grass, related to common wheat, and one of the most widely distributed and destructive weeds in the North Temperate Zone.... Quackgrass can rarely be exterminated on large areas, but it can be brought under reasonable control. The best plan is to allow it to form a sod and then plow it in midsummer during dry hot weather. Attacking the weed in wet weather or in the spring when the rootstocks are growing vigorously is almost a waste of time. After plowing, the field should be harrowed frequently until winter and the following year planted with a cultivated crop. A smother crop may follow the cultivated crop. On small areas quackgrass can be eradicated by hand digging, smothering with tar paper, spraying with chemicals, or by other means. Quackgrass makes good hay, pasturage, silage, and lawns and often can be utilized more economically than it can be destroyed." -- p. 2
Date: 1923
Creator: Kephart, L. W. (Leonard Wheeler), 1892-
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

[Log shed]

Description: Photograph of a log shed in Jämshög, Sweden. The shed facade is visible in the foreground. A low wooden door is open in the center of the shed. The shed has a grass roof which is partially visible in the top foreground.
Date: June 8, 1960
Creator: Gough, Ray
Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design

[Farm house]

Description: Photograph of a wooden farmhouse with grass roof in Jämshög, Sweden. The side of the house is visible in the foreground. A fenced in garden sits next to the house. A group of women is visible in front of the entrance in the right foreground.
Date: June 8, 1960
Creator: Gough, Ray
Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design

[Farmstead]

Description: Photograph of a farmstead in Jämshög, Sweden. A variety of wooden structures are visible in the foreground. The two larger houses in the middle ground are built of wooden logs and topped with grass roofs.
Date: June 8, 1960
Creator: Gough, Ray
Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design

[Farm house]

Description: Photograph of a farm house in Jämshög, Sweden. The farm house is visible in the foreground with a simple bench positioned on the right side. Another building and trees are visible in the background. The house is constructed of wooden logs with a grass roof.
Date: June 8, 1960
Creator: Gough, Ray
Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design

[Peasant Houses]

Description: Photograph of peasant houses in Lund, Sweden. In the foreground, a low stone wall is visible on a grass lawn. Trees are interspersed with peasant houses behind the wall. The houses are constructed of wood with grass roofs.
Date: June 8, 1960
Creator: Gough, Ray
Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design

[Bell Tower]

Description: Photograph of a bell tower in Lund, Sweden. In the foreground, a grass lawn is visible with goats scattered around. The wooden bell tower is visible on the lawn. A circular driveway surrounds the lawn. A building with a grass roof is visible on the other side of the driveway. Trees are visible in the background.
Date: August 6, 1960
Creator: Gough, Ray
Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design

[Kitten]

Description: Photograph of a kitten on a sidewalk. In the image, the tabby kitten stands in the middle of the sidewalk with mowed grass and a lawn chair behind it.
Date: unknown
Creator: Clark, Joe
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

Producing and harvesting grass seed in the Great Plains.

Description: Discusses best practices for selecting, growing, and harvesting grass seed in the Great Plains states: Montana, Wyoming, Nebraska, Colorado, Texas, Oklahoma, New Mexico, north Dakota, and South Dakota.
Date: 1957
Creator: Cooper, Harold W., 1914-; Atkins, Maurice Donald, 1912- & Smith, James E., Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Rhodes Grass

Description: "Rhodes grass was introduced from southern Africa in 1902, and has proved of value for cultivation in the warmer parts of the United States, being grown more largely in Florida and Texas than elsewhere.... It makes a heavy yield of hay of excellent quality, as the stems are slender, tender, and very leafy. The hay is cured easily and is relished by all kinds of live stock.... This bulletin mentions the soil preferences of this grass and gives the methods of seeding and after-treatment employed as well as handling the hay and pasturing and seed saving." -- p. 2
Date: 1919
Creator: Tracy, S. M. (Samuel Mills), 1847-1920
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Rhodes Grass

Description: Revised edition. "Rhodes grass was introduced from southern Africa in 1902, and has proved of value for cultivation in the warmer parts of the United States, being grown more largely in Florida and Texas than elsewhere.... It makes a heavy yield of hay of excellent quality, as the stems are slender, tender, and very leafy. The hay is cured easily and is relished by all kinds of live stock.... This bulletin mentions the soil preferences of this grass and gives the methods of seeding and after-treatment employed as well as handling the hay and pasturing and seed saving." -- p. 2
Date: 1922
Creator: Tracy, S. M. (Samuel Mills), 1847-1920
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Sudan grass.

Description: Describes the varieties, characteristics, and uses of Sudan grass. Includes instructions for control of diseases and pests.
Date: March 1957
Creator: Hein, M. A. (Mason August), b. 1894
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Moisture Metrics Project

Description: the goal of this project was to determine the optimum moisture levels for biomass processing for pellets commercially, by correlating data taken from numerous points in the process, and across several different feedstock materials produced and harvested using a variety of different management practices. This was to be done by correlating energy consumption and material through put rates with the moisture content of incoming biomass ( corn & wheat stubble, native grasses, weeds, & grass straws), and the quality of the final pellet product.This project disseminated the data through a public website, and answering questions form universities across Missouri that are engaged in biomass conversion technologies. Student interns from a local university were employed to help collect data, which enabled them to learn firsthand about biomass processing.
Date: August 31, 2011
Creator: Schuchmann, Mark
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department