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[Young Boy Showing Young Girl a Tree Frog]

Description: Photograph of a Young Boy Showing Young Girl a Tree Frog. The boy is Junebug Clark with a cousin from South Carolina. Photo was made on the Clark Family Farm in Cumberland Gap, Tennessee. Photo by: Joe Clark, HBSS. Clark PhotoFile: 0000-0019-17
Date: 195u
Creator: Clark, Joe
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

Accelerated Gene Evolution and Subfunctionalization in the Pseudotetraploid Frog Xenopus Laevis

Description: Ancient whole genome duplications have been implicated in the vertebrate and teleost radiations, and in the emergence of diverse angiosperm lineages, but the evolutionary response to such a perturbation is still poorly understood. The African clawed frog Xenopus laevis experienced a relatively recent tetraploidization {approx} 40 million years ago. Analysis of the considerable amount of EST sequence available for this species together with the genome sequence of the related diploid Xenopus tropicalis provides a unique opportunity to study the genomic response to whole genome duplication.
Date: March 1, 2007
Creator: Hellsten, Uffe; Khokha, Mustafa K.; Grammar, Timothy C.; Harland,Richard M.; Richardson, Paul & Rokhsar, Daniel S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Abundance of Green Tree Frogs and Insects in Artificial Canopy Gaps in a Bottomland Hardwood Forest.

Description: ABSTRACT - We found more green tree frogs ( Hyla cinerea) n canopv gaps than in closed canopy forest. Of the 331 green tree frogs observed, 88% were in canopv gaps. Likewise, higher numbers and biomasses of insects were captured in the open gap habitat Flies were the most commonlv collected insect group accounting for 54% of the total capture. These data suggest that one reason green tree frogs were more abundant in canopy gaps was the increased availability of prey and that small canopy gaps provide early successional habitats that are beneficial to green tree frog populations.
Date: April 1, 2005
Creator: Horn, Scott; Hanula, James, L.; Ulyshen, Michael D. & Kilgo, John, C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Abundance of green tree frogs and insects in artificial canopy gaps in a bottomland hardwood forest.

Description: Horn, Scott, James L. Hanula, Michael D. Ulyshen, and John C. Kilgo. 2005. Abundance of green tree frogs and insects in artificial canopy gaps in a bottomland hardwood forest. Am. Midl. Nat. 153:321-326. Abstract: We found more green tree frogs (Hyla cinerea) in canopy gaps than in closed canopy forest. Of the 331 green tree frogs observed, 88% were in canopy gaps. Likewise, higher numbers and biomasses of insects were captured in the open gap habitat. Flies were the most commonly collected insect group accounting for 54% of the total capture. These data suggest that one reason green tree frogs were more abundant in canopy gaps was the increased availability of prey and that small canopy gaps provide early successional habitats that are beneficial to green tree frog populations.
Date: January 1, 2005
Creator: Horn, Scott; Hanula, James L.; Ulyshen, Michael D. & Kilgo, John C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Genome of the Western Clawed Frog Xenopus tropicalis

Description: The western clawed frog Xenopus tropicalis is an important model for vertebrate development that combines experimental advantages of the African clawed frog Xenopus laevis with more tractable genetics. Here we present a draft genome sequence assembly of X. tropicalis. This genome encodes over 20,000 protein-coding genes, including orthologs of at least 1,700 human disease genes. Over a million expressed sequence tags validated the annotation. More than one-third of the genome consists of transposable elements, with unusually prevalent DNA transposons. Like other tetrapods, the genome contains gene deserts enriched for conserved non-coding elements. The genome exhibits remarkable shared synteny with human and chicken over major parts of large chromosomes, broken by lineage-specific chromosome fusions and fissions, mainly in the mammalian lineage.
Date: October 1, 2009
Creator: Hellsten, Uffe; Harland, Richard M.; Gilchrist, Michael J.; Hendrix, David; Jurka, Jerzy; Kapitonov, Vladimir et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Sequencing and analysis of 10967 full-length cDNA clones from Xenopus laevis and Xenopus tropicalis

Description: Sequencing of full-insert clones from full-length cDNA libraries from both Xenopus laevis and Xenopus tropicalis has been ongoing as part of the Xenopus Gene Collection initiative. Here we present an analysis of 10967 clones (8049 from X. laevis and 2918 from X. tropicalis). The clone set contains 2013 orthologs between X. laevis and X. tropicalis as well as 1795 paralog pairs within X. laevis. 1199 are in-paralogs, believed to have resulted from an allotetraploidization event approximately 30 million years ago, and the remaining 546 are likely out-paralogs that have resulted from more ancient gene duplications, prior to the divergence between the two species. We do not detect any evidence for positive selection by the Yang and Nielsen maximum likelihood method of approximating d{sub N}/d{sub S}. However, d{sub N}/d{sub S} for X. laevis in-paralogs is elevated relative to X. tropicalis orthologs. This difference is highly significant, and indicates an overall relaxation of selective pressures on duplicated gene pairs. Within both groups of paralogs, we found evidence of subfunctionalization, manifested as differential expression of paralogous genes among tissues, as measured by EST information from public resources. We have observed, as expected, a higher instance of subfunctionalization in out-paralogs relative to in-paralogs.
Date: October 31, 2005
Creator: Morin, R D; Chang, E; Petrescu, A; Liao, N; Kirkpatrick, R; Griffith, M et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Insights from Human/Mouse genome comparisons

Description: Large-scale public genomic sequencing efforts have provided a wealth of vertebrate sequence data poised to provide insights into mammalian biology. These include deep genomic sequence coverage of human, mouse, rat, zebrafish, and two pufferfish (Fugu rubripes and Tetraodon nigroviridis) (Aparicio et al. 2002; Lander et al. 2001; Venter et al. 2001; Waterston et al. 2002). In addition, a high-priority has been placed on determining the genomic sequence of chimpanzee, dog, cow, frog, and chicken (Boguski 2002). While only recently available, whole genome sequence data have provided the unique opportunity to globally compare complete genome contents. Furthermore, the shared evolutionary ancestry of vertebrate species has allowed the development of comparative genomic approaches to identify ancient conserved sequences with functionality. Accordingly, this review focuses on the initial comparison of available mammalian genomes and describes various insights derived from such analysis.
Date: March 30, 2003
Creator: Pennacchio, Len A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

[Ceramic figures]

Description: Photograph of ceramic figures for sale in Shigaraki, Japan. Rows of figures small to large are visible in the foreground. The figures are on sale outside of a store. The figures depict bears, turtles, frogs, and men wearing green robes.
Date: 1978
Creator: Gough, Ray
Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design

The Histological Effects of Injections of Fish Pituitary Extracts on the Testes of Male Frogs, (Rana Pipiens), and the Reproductive System of Immature Mice

Description: The purpose of this investigation was first, to make a histological and cytological study of the testis of male frogs, Rana pipiens, and to determine if there were tissue or cellular changes as well as physiological effects caused by fish pituitary-extract injections. Second, to determine if injections of fish pituitary extract into immature female white mice caused histological changes in the ovaries and uteri.
Date: 1949
Creator: Robertson, William George
Partner: UNT Libraries

[News Script: Frogs]

Description: Script from the WBAP-TV/NBC station in Fort Worth, Texas, covering a news story about the James R. Record aquarium in Fort Worth acquiring a couple of Horned Frogs from the jungles of Brazil.
Date: November 14, 1957
Creator: WBAP-TV (Television station : Fort Worth, Tex.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

LLNL 10(a)(1)(A) Annual Report (TE-053672-2)--2005

Description: This report summarizes research related to Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) Experimental Test Site, Site 300 (S300), located within Alameda and San Joaquin Counties (Figure 1) and conducted under the 10(a)(1)(A) (Recovery) permit TE-053672-2. This property is held in ownership by the U.S. Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). The 2005 Recovery research at S300 involved fieldwork associated with only two species: Alameda whipsnake (Masticophis lateralis euryxanthus) and the California red-legged frog (Rana aurora draytonii) (RLF). Note: the whipsnake subspecies existing at S300 shows taxonomic variation (generally 50% chaparral whipsnake [Masticophis lateralis] traits) when compared to the Alameda whipsnake (Riemer 1954) and therefore it will be referred to as ''California whipsnake (Masticophis lateralis)'' (CWS) for classification purposes in this report (Swaim 2004).
Date: January 26, 2006
Creator: Woollett, J
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Studies of Annual and Seasonal Variations in Four Species of Reptiles and Amphibians at Los Alamos National Laboratory

Description: Baseline studies of reptiles and amphibians of the Pajarito wetlands at Los Alamos National Laboratory have been conducted by the Ecology group since 1990. With the data gathered from 1990-1997 (excluding 1992), we examined the annual and seasonal population changes of four species of reptiles and amphibians over the past seven years. The four species studied are the Woodhouse toad (Bufo woodhousii), the western chorus frog (Pseudacris triseriata), the many-lined skink (Eunzeces nudtivirgatus), and the plateau striped whiptail lizard (Cnemidophorus velox). Statistical analyses indicate a significant change on a seasonal basis for the western chorus frog and the many-lined skink. Results indicate a significant difference in the annual population of the Woodhouse toad.
Date: July 1, 1998
Creator: Keller, D.C.; Nelson, E.I.; Mullen, M.A.; Foxx, T.S. & Haarmann, T.K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Big Island - The McKenzie River, Technical Report 1998-2001.

Description: The Big Island site is located in the McKenzie River flood plain, containing remnant habitats of what was once more common in this area. A diverse array of flora and fauna, representing significant wildlife habitats, is present on the site. Stands of undisturbed forested wetlands, along with riparian shrub habitats and numerous streams and ponds, support a diversity of wildlife species, including neotropical migratory songbirds, raptors, mammals, reptiles, and amphibians (including two State-listed Sensitive Critical species). The project is located in eastern Springfield, Oregon (Figure 1). The project area encompasses 187 acres under several ownerships in Section 27 of Township 17S, Range 2W. Despite some invasion of non-native species, the site contains large areas of relatively undisturbed wildlife habitat. Over several site visits, a variety of wildlife and signs of wildlife were observed, including an active great blue heron rookery, red-Legged frog egg masses, signs of beaver, and a bald eagle, Wildlife habitat values resulting from the purchase of this site will contribute toward the goal of mitigating for habitat lost as outlined in the Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) Mitigation and Enhancement Plan for the Willamette River Basin. Under this Plan, mitigation goals and objectives were developed as a result of the loss of wildlife habitat due to the construction of Federal hydroelectric facilities in the Willamette River Basin. Results of the Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) will be used to: (1) determine the current habitat status of the study area and habitat enhancement potential of the site consistent with wildlife mitigation goals and objectives; and (2) develop a management plan for the area.
Date: March 1, 2001
Creator: Sieglitz, Greg
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Supplement analysis for Greenville Gate access to Kirschbaum Field at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Description: The National Ignition Facility (NIF) Program proposes to provide additional access to the Kirschbaum Field construction laydown area. This additional access would alleviate traffic congestion at the East Gate entrance to Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) from Greenville Road during periods of heavy construction for the NIF. The new access would be located along the northeastern boundary of LLNL, about 305 m (1,000 ft) north of the East Gate entrance. The access road would extend from Greenville Road to the Kirschbaum Field construction laydown area and would traverse an existing storm water drainage channel. Two culverts, side by side, and a compacted road base would be installed across the channel. The security fence that runs parallel to Greenville Road would be modified to accommodate this new entrance and a vehicle gate would be installed at the entrance of Kirschbaum Field. The exiting shoulder along Greenville Road would be converted into a new turn lane for trucks entering the new gate. This analysis evaluates the impacts of constructing the Kirschbaum Field bridge and access gate at a different location than was analyzed in the NIF Project specific Analysis in the Final Programmatic environmental Impact Statement for Stockpile Stewardship and Management (SS and M PEIS) published in September 1996 (DOE/EIS-0236) and the Record of Decision published on December 19, 1996. Issues of concern addressed in this supplement analysis include potential impacts to wetlands downstream of the access bridge, potential impacts to the California red-legged frog (Rana aurora draytonii) listed as threatened on the federal listing pursuant to the Endangered Species Act of 1974, and potential impacts on the 100-yr floodplain along the Arroyo Las Positas.
Date: December 5, 1997
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Photon Beam Diagnostics for VISA FEL

Description: The VISA (Visible to Infrared SASE Amplifier) project is designed to be a SASE-FEL driven to saturation in the sub-micron wavelength region. Its goal is to test various aspects of the existing theory of Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission, as well as numerical codes. Measurements include: angular and spectral distribution of the FEL light at the exit and inside of the undulator; electron beam micro-bunching using CTR; single-shot time resolved measurements of the pulse profile, using auto-correlation technique and FROG algorithm. The diagnostics are designed to provide maximum information on the physics of the SASE-FEL process, to ensure a close comparison of the experimental results with theory and simulations.
Date: November 5, 1999
Creator: Murokh, A.; Pellegrini, C.; Rosenzweig, J.; Frigola, P.; Musumeci, P.; Tremaine, A. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

PVC Pipe Samplers for Hylid Frogs: A Cautionary Note

Description: When such is available, many hylid frogs use artificial refugia, and this trait is frequently used as a basis for sampling populations of these frogs. Artificial refugia are any manmade objects that the animals may use for shelter (e.g. bird houses, bamboo stakes, lengths of pipe, etc.). By choosing refugia that the animals will readily enter and from which they may be easily removed, sampling can be directed toward particular species or size classes. Several variables have been considered when examining bias in sampling using these refugia. Among these variables are inside diameter of the pipes, pipe length, associated vegetation and height above ground. Our observations were not intended as an evaluation of polyvinyl chloride pipe traps as a sampling technique but rather were part of a study examining invertebrate and amphibian faunas associated with slope wetlands. Slope wetlands are wetlands formed where soil contours favor outcropping of water to the surface to form pools or channels often connected to streams. Despite the apparently small amount of appropriate data in this study, there are few enough quantified or semi-quantified data on this topic to be worth a cautionary note.
Date: April 7, 2004
Creator: MARTIN, FLOYD
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

LLNL 10(a)(1)(A) Annual Report (TE-053672-2)--2006

Description: This report summarizes research related to Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) Experimental Test Site, Site 300 (S300), located within Alameda and San Joaquin Counties (Figure 1) and conducted under the 10(a)(1)(A) (Recovery) permit TE-053672-2. The U.S. Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) holds this property in ownership. The 2006 recovery research at S300 involved fieldwork associated with two species: the California whipsnake (Masticophis lateralis) (MALA) and the California red-legged frog (Rana aurora draytonii) (CRLF). A research project (Biological Opinion 1-1-02-F-0064) investigating the direct effects (fatality/harm) and indirect impacts (habitat alteration) of prescribed burning of coastal sage scrub on MALA was permitted by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service), Sacramento Office, in the Spring of 2002. Several different public resource management agencies were approved by the Service to implement recovery-oriented (fuels treatment) studies associated with this research plan. LLNL's proposed seven-year study was initiated in 2002 and is anticipated to conclude in 2008. Results reflected in this report apply to information gathered during the first five years of the project; because of the low MALA sample size collected onsite and the unforeseen wildland fire that burned both of the study sites in 2005, long term conservation-related measures for MALA are not yet evident from study analyses. The CRLF research (Biological Opinion 1-1-02-F-0062) involved translocating individuals from two wetland locations that had received artificial (potable) water discharges for the last 15-20 years. CRLF's that occupied the wetland sites were moved to an enhanced wetland area further downstream (engineered pools in a pre-existing perennial drainage) in an area called ''Mid-Elk Ravine''. The aboveground, potable water flows were terminated once all CRLF translocations had been completed (Summer of 2006).
Date: January 31, 2007
Creator: Woollett, J
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

2010 Dry and 2009 - 2010 Wet Season Branchiopod Survey Report, Site 300

Description: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) requested that Condor Country Consulting, Inc. (CCCI) perform wet season surveys and manage the dry season sampling for listed branchiopods in two ponded locations within the Site 300 Experimental Test Site. Site 300 is located in Alameda and San Joaquin Counties, located between the Cities of Livermore and Tracy. The two pool locations have been identified for possible amphibian enhancement activities in support of the Compensation Plan for impacts tied to the Building 850 soil clean-up project. The Building 850 project design resulted in formal consultation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) as an amendment (File 81420-2009-F-0235) to the site-wide Biological Opinion (BO) (File 1-1-02-F-0062) in the spring of 2009 and requires mitigation for the California tiger salamander (AMCA, Ambystoma californiense) and California red-legged frog (CRLF, Rana draytonii) habitat loss. Both pools contain breeding AMCA, but do not produce metamorphs due to limited hydroperiod. The pool to the southeast (Pool BC-FS-2) is the preferred site for amphibian enhancement activities, and the wetland to northwest (Pool OA-FS-1) is the alternate location for enhancement. However, prior to enhancement, LLNL has been directed by USFWS (BO Conservation Measure 17 iii) to 'conduct USFWS protocol-level branchiopod surveys to determine whether listed brachiopod species are present within the compensation area.' CCCI conducted surveys for listed branchiopods in the 2009-2010 wet season to determine the presence of federally-listed branchiopods at the two pools (previous surveys with negative findings were performed by CCCI in 2001-2002 and 2002-2003 onsite). Surveys were conducted to partially satisfy the survey requirements of the USFWS 'Interim Survey Guidelines to Permittees for Recovery Permits under Section 10(a)(1)(A) of the Endangered Species Act for the Listed Vernal Pool Branchiopods' ('Guidelines, USFWS 1996 and BO Conservation Measure 17 iii). The dry sampling (included as an Appendix D) followed ...
Date: March 14, 2011
Creator: Dexter, W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department