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Envelope Bag

Description: The clutch bag is cream colored with muted green and yellow embroidered decoration.
Access: This item is restricted to UNT Community Members. Login required if off-campus.
Date: unknown
Creator: Bernard, Julie
Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design

[Envelope from Matilda Brantley Dodd and Betty Franklin, January 2, 1880]

Description: An envelope addressed to Charles B. Moore in Collin County, Melissa Texas. A postal stamp on the front reads: "Gallatin, Tenn.; Jan 2." A postal stamp on the back reads: "Melissa, Collin Co., Texas; Jan 6, 1880." A handwritten note reads: "Matilda Dodd; + Betty Franklin; Received [Jan]; 1880."
Date: January 2, 1880
Creator: [Dodd, Matilda Brantley] & [Franklin, Betty]
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

Safeguards Envelope Progress FY10

Description: The Safeguards Envelope is a strategy to determine a set of specific operating parameters within which nuclear facilities may operate to maximize safeguards effectiveness without sacrificing safety or plant efficiency. This paper details the additions to the advanced operating techniques that will be applied to real plant process monitoring (PM) data from the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). Research this year focused on combining disparate pieces of data together to maximize operating time with minimal downtime due to safeguards. A Chi-Square and Croiser's cumulative sum were both included as part of the new analysis. Because of a major issue with the original data, the implementation of the two new tests did not add to the existing set of tests, though limited one-variable optimization made a small increase in detection probability. Additional analysis was performed to determine if prior analysis would have caused a major security or safety operating envelope issue. It was determined that a safety issue would have resulted from the prior research, but that the security may have been increased under certain conditions.
Date: October 1, 2010
Creator: Metcalf, Richard
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Analysis of Building Envelope Construction in 2003 CBECS

Description: The purpose of this analysis is to determine "typical" building envelope characteristics for buildings built after 1980. We address three envelope components in this paper - roofs, walls, and window area. These typical building envelope characteristics were used in the development of DOE’s Reference Buildings .
Date: June 1, 2007
Creator: Winiarski, David W.; Halverson, Mark A. & Jiang, Wei
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Small Commercial Building Re-tuning: A Primer

Description: To help building owners and managers address issues related to energy-efficient operation of small buildings, DOE has developed a Small Building Re-tuning training curriculum. This "primer" provides additional background information to understand some of the concepts presented in the Small Building Re-tuning training. The intent is that those who are less familiar with the building energy concepts will review this material before taking the building re-tuning training class.
Date: September 30, 2013
Creator: Cort, Katherine A.; Hostick, Donna J.; Underhill, Ronald M.; Fernandez, Nicholas & Katipamula, Srinivas
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Ozone Reductions Using Residential Building Envelopes

Description: Ozone is an air pollutant with that can have significant health effects and a significant source of ozone in some regions of California is outdoor air. Because people spend the vast majority of their time indoors, reduction in indoor levels of ozone could lead to improved health for many California residents. Ozone is removed from indoor air by surface reactions and can also be filtered by building envelopes. The magnitude of the envelope impact depends on the specific building materials that the air flows over and the geometry of the air flow paths through the envelope that can be changes by mechanical ventilation operation. The 2008 Residential Building Standards in California include minimum requirements for mechanical ventilation by referencing ASHRAE Standard 62.2. This study examines the changes in indoor ozone depending on the mechanical ventilation system selected to meet these requirements. This study used detailed simulations of ventilation in a house to examine the impacts of different ventilation systems on indoor ozone concentrations. The simulation results showed that staying indoors reduces exposure to ozone by 80percent to 90percent, that exhaust ventilation systems lead to lower indoor ozone concentrations, that opening of windows should be avoided at times of high outdoor ozone, and that changing the time at which mechanical ventilation occurs has the ability to halve exposure to ozone. Future work should focus on the products of ozone reactions in the building envelope and the fate of these products with respect to indoor exposures.
Date: February 1, 2009
Creator: Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max & Nazaroff, William W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Advanced Envelope Research for Factory Built Housing, Phase 3 -- Design Development and Prototyping

Description: The Advanced Envelope Research effort will provide factory homebuilders with high performance, cost-effective alternative envelope designs. In the near term, these technologies will play a central role in meeting stringent energy code requirements. For manufactured homes, the thermal requirements, last updated by statute in 1994, will move up to the more rigorous IECC 2012 levels in 2013, the requirements of which are consistent with site built and modular housing. This places added urgency on identifying envelope technologies that the industry can implement in the short timeframe. The primary goal of this research is to develop wall designs that meet the thermal requirements based on 2012 IECC standards. Given the affordable nature of manufactured homes, impact on first cost is a major consideration in developing the new envelope technologies. This work is part of a four-phase, multi-year effort. Phase 1 identified seven envelope technologies and provided a preliminary assessment of three selected methods for building high performance wall systems. Phase 2 focused on the development of viable product designs, manufacturing strategies, addressing code and structural issues, and cost analysis of the three selected options. An industry advisory committee helped critique and select the most viable solution to move further in the research -- stud walls with continuous exterior insulation. Phase 3, the subject of the current report, focused on the design development of the selected wall concept and explored variations on the use of exterior foam insulation. The scope also included material selection, manufacturing and cost analysis, and prototyping and testing.
Date: January 1, 2014
Creator: Levy, E.; Kessler, B.; Mullens, M. & Rath, P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Case Study of Envelope Sealing in Existing Multiunit Structures

Description: Envelope air sealing was included in the retrofit of a 244 unit low-rise multifamily housing complex in Durham, N.C. Pre- and post-retrofit enclosure leakage tests were conducted on 51 units and detailed diagnostics were performed on 16. On average, total leakage was reduced by nearly half, from 19.7 ACH50 to 9.4 ACH50. Costs for air sealing were $0.31 per square foot of conditioned floor area, lower than estimates found in the National Residential Efficiency Measures Database (NREMD) and other sources, perhaps due in part to the large-scale production nature of the project. Modeling with BEopt software -- using an estimate of 85% of the envelope air leakage going to the outside (based on guarded tests performed at the site) -- calculated a space conditioning energy cost savings of 15% to 21% due to the air sealing retrofit. Important air leakage locations identified included plumbing and electrical penetrations, dropped ceilings/soffits, windows, ducts and wall-to-floor intersections. Previous repair activity had created significant leakage locations as well. Specifications and a pictorial guide were developed for contractors performing the work.
Date: October 1, 2012
Creator: Dentz, J.; Conlin, F. & Podorson, D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Stud Walls With Continuous Exterior Insulation for Factory Built Housing: New York, New York (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

Description: The Advanced Envelope Research effort will provide factory homebuilders with high performance, cost-effective alternative envelope designs. In the near term, these technologies will play a central role in meeting stringent energy code requirements. For manufactured homes, the thermal requirements, last updated by statute in 1994, will move up to the more rigorous IECC 2012 levels in 2013, the requirements of which are consistent with site built and modular housing. This places added urgency on identifying envelope technologies that the industry can implement in the short timeframe. The primary goal of this research is to develop wall designs that meet the thermal requirements based on 2012 IECC standards. Given the affordable nature of manufactured homes, impact on first cost is a major consideration in developing the new envelope technologies. This work is part of a four-phase, multi-year effort. Phase 1 identified seven envelope technologies and provided a preliminary assessment of three selected methods for building high performance wall systems. Phase 2 focused on the development of viable product designs, manufacturing strategies, addressing code and structural issues, and cost analysis of the three selected options. An industry advisory committee helped critique and select the most viable solution to move further in the research - stud walls with continuous exterior insulation. Phase 3, the subject of the current report, focused on the design development of the selected wall concept and explored variations on the use of exterior foam insulation. The scope also included material selection, manufacturing and cost analysis, and prototyping and testing.
Date: January 1, 2014
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Infiltration heat recovery in building walls: Computational fluid dynamics investigations results

Description: Conventional calculations of heating (and cooling) loads for buildings assume that conduction heat loss (or gain) through walls is independent of air infiltration heat loss (or gain). During passage through the building envelope, infiltrating air substantially exchanges heat wall insulation leading to partial recovery of heat conducted through the wall. The Infiltration Heat Recovery (IHR) factor was introduced to quantify the heat recovery and correct the conventional calculations. In this study, Computational Fluid Dynamics was used to calculate infiltration heat recovery under a range of idealized conditions, specifically to understand factors that influence it, and assess its significance in building heat load calculations. This study shows for the first time the important effect of the external boundary layers on conduction and infiltration heat loads. Results show (under the idealized conditions studied here) that (1) the interior details of the wall encountered in the leakage pa th (i.e., insulated or empty walls) do not greatly influence the IHR, the overall relative location of the cracks (i.e., inlet and outlet locations on the wall) has the largest influence on the IHR magnitude, (2) external boundary layers on the walls substantially contribute to IHR and (3) the relative error in heat load calculations resulting from the use of the conventional calculational method (i.e., ignoring IHR) is between 3 percent and 13 percent for infiltrating flows typically found in residential buildings.
Date: August 5, 2002
Creator: Abadie, Marc O.; Finlayson, Elizabeth U. & Gadgil, Ashok J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Cost effectiveness of the 1993 Model Energy Code in Colorado

Description: This report documents an analysis of the cost effectiveness of the Council of American Building Officials` 1993 Model Energy Code (MEC) building thermal-envelope requirements for single-family homes in Colorado. The goal of this analysis was to compare the cost effectiveness of the 1993 MEC to current construction practice in Colorado based on an objective methodology that determined the total life-cycle cost associated with complying with the 1993 MEC. This analysis was performed for the range of Colorado climates. The costs and benefits of complying with the 1993 NIEC were estimated from the consumer`s perspective. The time when the homeowner realizes net cash savings (net positive cash flow) for homes built in accordance with the 1993 MEC was estimated to vary from 0.9 year in Steamboat Springs to 2.4 years in Denver. Compliance with the 1993 MEC was estimated to increase first costs by $1190 to $2274, resulting in an incremental down payment increase of $119 to $227 (at 10% down). The net present value of all costs and benefits to the home buyer, accounting for the mortgage and taxes, varied from a savings of $1772 in Springfield to a savings of $6614 in Steamboat Springs. The ratio of benefits to costs ranged from 2.3 in Denver to 3.8 in Steamboat Springs.
Date: June 1, 1995
Creator: Lucas, R.G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

[Envelope addressed to H. S. Moore]

Description: Envelope addressed to H. S. Moore which has a note on the left that says that it is from Neal Moore in 1885. The postal stamp on the front cannot be read. The stamp on the back says McKinney, Texas.
Date: November 14, 1885
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[Envelope, September 15, 1840]

Description: Envelope addressed to Charles B. Moore, Millright, Sherman (Texas) that has a post mark from McKinney, Texas, September 13. A note in the lower right corner says that it was read on September 25, 1840. Another note is on the lower left corner and it reads, "Care of Hall & Chapman."
Date: September 13, 1840
Creator: Moore, Henry S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[Envelope addressed C. B. Moore]

Description: Envelope addressed to Charles B. Moore with a postal stamp that gives the date January 23, 1871. A note in the lower left corner list the name of J. R. Washburn and J. C. Sneed. It says is was received February 7th, 1870. T
Date: January 23, 1871
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[Envelope addressed to C. B. Moore]

Description: Envelope addressed to Charles B. Moore from J. A. Walden, county clerk, Collin County, Texas. The post mark is for McKinney, Texas, August 26, 1895. A note in the lower right hand corner says that it was received on August 28, 1895. On the back of the envelope is written, "I've no fears to annoy, & no hopes that might tease with the prospective oblivion assuring me ease."
Date: 1895~
Creator: Walden, J. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[Envelope for C. B. Moore]

Description: Envelope with the name C. B. Moore across it. A note on the left side indicates that it was used to hold the deeds to the land he owned from 1866 to 1896 in Collin County, Texas.
Date: January 22, 1896
Creator: Moore, Charles B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections