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Application of Solar Technology to Today's Energy Needs - Volume 1

Description: A report by the Office of Technology Assessment (OTA) reviewing "a range of solar energy systems designed to produce thermal and electrical energy directly from sunlight" and examining this technology, identifying "the circumstances under which such systems could be economically attractive" (p. iii).
Date: June 1978
Creator: United States. Congress. Office of Technology Assessment.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Towards increased policy relevance in energy modeling

Description: Historically, most energy models were reasonably equipped to assess the impact of a subsidy or change in taxation, but are often insufficient to assess the impact of more innovative policy instruments. We evaluate the models used to assess future energy use, focusing on industrial energy use. We explore approaches to engineering-economic analysis that could help improve the realism and policy relevance of engineering-economic modeling frameworks. We also explore solutions to strengthen the policy usefulness of engineering-economic analysis that can be built from a framework of multi-disciplinary cooperation. We focus on the so-called ''engineering-economic'' (or ''bottom-up'') models, as they include the amount of detail that is commonly needed to model policy scenarios. We identify research priorities for the modeling framework, technology representation in models, policy evaluation and modeling of decision-making behavior.
Date: July 29, 2003
Creator: Worrell, Ernst; Ramesohl, Stephan & Boyd, Gale
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Supply and Demand For Energy in the United States by States and Regions, 1960 and 1965 (In Four Parts): 3. Dry Natural Gas

Description: Report issued by the U.S. Bureau of Mines discussing regional and state supply and demand data. As stated in the introduction, "data for 1960 and 1965 have been presented in tabular form as supply-demand balances, showing the development of the total supply available for consumption and the disposition of that supply-demand by consuming sector for each state and region" (p. 2-3). This report includes maps, tables, and illustrations.
Date: 1969
Creator: Crump, Lulie H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Supply and Demand for Energy in the United States by States and Regions, 1960 and 1965 (In Four Parts): 2. Utility Electricity

Description: Report issued by the U.S. Bureau of Mines discussing supply and demand data from the energy industry. As stated in the introduction, "in this report, the discussions in the text describe the methods used to develop data deficiencies for inputs to the supply-demand tables" (p. 1). This report includes maps, tables, and illustrations.
Date: 1969
Creator: Hall, Franklin P. & Broderick, Grace N.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Supply and Demand For Energy in the United States by States and Regions, 1960 and 1965 (In Four Parts): 4. Petroleum and Natural Gas Liquids

Description: Report issued by the U.S. Bureau of Mines discussing state and regional supply and demand data. As stated in the introduction, "the primary purpose of this study is to provide, on a state-by-state basis, petroleum and natural gas liquids industry data that can be (1) integrated into state and regional energy balances by source, form, and consumer sectors, and (2) used to determine interstate and inter-regional energy flows" (p. 1). This report includes maps, tables, and illustrations.
Date: 1969
Creator: Crump, Lulie H. & Yasnowsky, Phillip N.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Supply and Demand for Energy in the United States by States and Regions, 1960 and 1965: Integrated Energy Balances and Energy Flows (Prepared from Four Parts)

Description: Report issued by the U.S. Bureau of Mines discussing state and regional supply and demand data. Integrated energy balances and energy flows are presented and used "to produce, transform, and transport energy to the point of consumption" (p. 1). This report includes maps, tables, and illustrations.
Date: 1970
Creator: Zaffarano, R. F.; Yasnowsky, P. N.; Crump, L. H. & Mo, W. Y.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Green Power Marketing in the United States: A Status Report (Eighth Edition)

Description: Voluntary consumer decisions to purchase electricity supplied by renewable energy sources represent a powerful market support mechanism for renewable energy development. Beginning in the early 1990s, a small number of U.S. utilities began offering "green power" options to their customers. Since then, these products have become more prevalent, both from utilities and in states that have introduced competition into their retail electricity markets. Today, more than 50% of all U.S. consumers have an option to purchase some type of green power product from a retail electricity provider. This report provides an overview of green power marketing activity in the United States. The first section provides an overview of green power markets, consumer response, and recent industry trends. The second section provides brief descriptions of utility green pricing programs. The third section describes companies that actively market green power in competitive markets and those that market renewable energy certificates nationally or regionally. The final section provides information on a select number of large, nonresidential green power purchasers, including businesses, universities, and government agencies.
Date: October 1, 2005
Creator: Bird, L. & Swezey, B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Green Power Marketing in the United States: A Status Report (Ninth Edition)

Description: Voluntary consumer decisions to purchase electricity supplied by renewable energy sources represent a powerful market support mechanism for renewable energy development. Beginning in the early 1990s, a small number of U.S. utilities began offering ''green power'' options to their customers. Since then, these products have become more prevalent, both from traditional utilities and from marketers operating in states that have introduced competition into their retail electricity markets. Today, more than half of all U.S. consumers have an option to purchase some type of green power product from a retail electricity provider. Currently, more than 600 utilities, or about 20% of utilities nationally, offer green power programs to customers. These programs allow customers to purchase some portion of their power supply as renewable energy--almost always at a higher price--or to contribute funds for the utility to invest in renewable energy development. The term ''green pricing'' is typically used to refer to these utility programs offered in regulated or noncompetitive electricity markets. This report documents green power marketing activities and trends in the United States.
Date: November 1, 2006
Creator: Bird, L. & Swezey, B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Biopower Technical Assessment: State of the Industry and the Technology

Description: This report provides an assessment of the state of the biopower industry and the technology for producing electricity and heat from biomass. Biopower (biomass-to-electricity generation), a proven electricity generating option in the United States and with about 11 GW of installed capacity, is the single largest source of non-hydro renewable electricity. This 11 GW of capacity encompasses about 7.5 GW of forest product industry and agricultural industry residues, about 3.0 GW of municipal solid waste-based generating capacity and 0.5 GW of other capacity such as landfill gas based production. The electricity production from biomass is being used and is expected to continue to be used as base load power in the existing electrical distribution system. An overview of sector barriers to biopower technology development is examined in Chapter 2. The discussion begins with an analysis of technology barriers that must be overcome to achieve successful technology pathways leading to the commercialization of biomass conversion and feedstock technologies. Next, an examination of institutional barriers is presented which encompasses the underlying policies, regulations, market development, and education needed to ensure the success of biopower. Chapter 3 summarizes biomass feedstock resources, characteristics, availability, delivered prices, requirements for processing, and the impediments and barriers to procurement. A discussion of lessons learned includes information on the California biomass energy industry, lessons from commercial biopower plants, lessons from selected DOE demonstration projects, and a short summary of the issues considered most critical for commercial success is presented in Chapter 4. A series of case studies, Chapter 5, have been performed on the three conversion routes for Combined Heat and Power (CHP) applications of biomass--direct combustion, gasification, and cofiring. The studies are based on technology characterizations developed by NREL and EPRI. Variables investigated include plant size and feed cost, and both cost of electricity and cost of ...
Date: January 1, 2003
Creator: Bain, R. L.; Amos, W. P.; Downing, M. & Perlack, R. L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Green Power Marketing in the United States: A Status Report; Seventh Edition

Description: Voluntary consumer decisions to purchase electricity supplied from renewable energy sources represent a powerful market support mechanism for renewable energy development. Beginning in the early 1990s, a small number of U.S. utilities began offering ''green power'' options to their customers. Since then, these products have become more prevalent both from utilities and in states that have introduced competition into their retail electricity markets. Today, more than 50% of all U.S. consumers have an option to purchase some type of green power product from a retail electricity provider. This report provides an overview of green power marketing activity in the United States. The first section provides an overview of green power markets, consumer response, and recent industry trends. Section 2 provides brief descriptions of the utility green pricing programs available nationally. Section 3 describes companies that actively market green power in competitive markets and those that market renew able energy certificates nationally or regionally. The last section provides information on a select number of large, nonresidential green power purchasers, including governmental agencies, universities, and businesses.
Date: September 1, 2004
Creator: Bird, L. & Swezey, B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department