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Tuning the LEDA RFQ 6.7 MeV accelerator

Description: This paper presents the results of tuning the 8 meter long Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) built for the Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA). This 350-MHz RFQ is split into four 2-meter-long-RFQs. Then they are joined with resonant coupling to form an 8-meter-long RFQ. This improves both the longitudinal stability and the transverse stability of this long RFQ. The frequencies of the modes near the RFQ mode are measured. The authors show the effect on the RF fields of an error in the temperature of each one of the 2-meter-long-RFQs. Slug tuners distributed along the outer walls tune the RFQ. The program RFQTUNE is used to determine the length of the tuners. The tuners are machined to length when the final tuning is complete.
Date: December 31, 1998
Creator: Young, L.M. & Rybarcyk, L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Coherent electromagnetic field imaging through Fourier transform heterodyne

Description: The authors present a detection process capable of directly imaging the transverse amplitude, phase, and if desired, Doppler shift of coherent electromagnetic fields. Based on coherent detection principles governing conventional heterodyned RADAR/LIDAR systems, Fourier Transform Heterodyne (FTH) incorporates transverse spatial encoding of the local oscillator for image capture. Appropriate selection of spatial encoding functions, or basis set, allows image retrieval by way of classic Fourier manipulations. Of practical interest: (1) imaging is accomplished on a single element detector requiring no additional scanning or moving components, and (2) a wide variety of appropriate spatial encoding functions exist that may be adaptively configured in real-time for applications requiring optimal detection. In this paper, they introduce the underlying principles governing FTH imaging, followed by demonstration of concept via a simple experimental setup based on a HeNe laser and a 69 element spatial phase modulator.
Date: December 1998
Creator: Cooke, B. J.; Laubscher, B. E.; Olivas, N. L.; Goeller, R. M.; Cafferty, M.; Briles, S. D. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Beam induced rf cavity transient voltage

Description: The authors calculate the transient voltage induced in a radio frequency cavity by the injection of a relativistic bunched beam into a circular accelerator. A simplified model of the beam induced voltage, using a single tone current signal, is generated and compared with the voltage induced by a more realistic model of a point-like bunched beam. The high Q limit of the bunched beam model is shown to be related simply to the simplified model. Both models are shown to induce voltages at the resonant frequency {omega}{sub r} of the cavity and at an integer multiple of the bunch revolution frequency (i.e. the accelerating frequency for powered cavity operation) h{omega}{sub {omicron}}. The presence of two nearby frequencies in the cavity leads to a modulation of the carrier wave exp(h{omega}{sub {omicron}}t). A special emphasis is placed in this paper on studying the modulation function. These models prove useful for computing the transient voltage induced in superconducting rf cavities, which was the motivation behind this research. The modulation of the transient cavity voltage discussed in this paper is the physical basis of the recently observed and explained new kinds of longitudinal rigid dipole mode which differs from the conventional Robinson mode.
Date: October 1, 1998
Creator: Kramer, S. L. & Wang, J. M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Theory of edge plasma in a spheromak

Description: Properties of the edge plasma in the SSPX spheromak during the plasma formation and sustainment phases are discussed. For the breakdown and formation phase, the main emphasis is on the analysis of possible plasma contamination by impurities from the electrodes of the plasma gun (helicity injector). The issue of an azimuthally uniform breakdown initiation is also discussed. After the plasma settles down in the main vacuum chamber, one has to sustain the current between the electrodes, in order to continuously inject helicity. We discuss properties of the plasma on the field lines intersecting the electrodes. We conclude that the thermal balance of this plasma is maintained by Joule heating competing with parallel heat losses to the electrodes. The resulting plasma temperature is in the range of 15 - 30 eV. Under the expected operational conditions, the ``current`` velocity of the electrons is only slightly below their thermal velocity. Implications of this observation are briefly discussed.
Date: May 1, 1998
Creator: Hooper, E.B., LLNL
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Wake field effects in APT linac

Description: The 1.7-GeV 100-mA CW proton linac is now under design for the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) Project. The high current leads to stringent restrictions on allowable beam losses (<1 nA/m), that requires analyzing carefully all possible loss sources. While wake-field effects are usually considered negligible in proton linacs, the author studies these effects for the APT to exclude potential problems at such a high current. Loss factors and resonance frequency spectra of various discontinuities of the vacuum chamber are investigated, both analytically and using 2-D and 3-D simulation codes with a single bunch as well as with many bunches. Here he concentrates on two features specific to the APT linac: loss factors for the design {beta} < 1 and CW beam structure.
Date: December 31, 1998
Creator: Kurennoy, S.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Electromagnetic interactions GEneRalized (EIGER): algorithm abstraction and HPC implementation

Description: Modern software development methods combined with key generalizations of standard computational algorithms enable the development of a new class of electromagnetic modeling tools. This paper describes current and anticipated capabilities of a frequency domain modeling code, EIGER, which has an extremely wide range of applicability. In addition, software implementation methods and high performance computing issues are discussed.
Date: April 21, 1998
Creator: Sharpe, R.M., LLNL
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

LEDA LLRF control system characterization

Description: The Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) for the Accelerator for the Production of Tritium (APT) project will be built at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The low-level RF (LLRF) control system portion of this accelerator must perform many functions, of which the primary one is controlling the RF fields in the accelerating cavities. Plans have been made to provide for on-line characterization of the LLRF control system and the complete RF system through use of stimulus and response buffers, and a digital signal processor built into the field control system electronics. The purpose of this circuitry is to characterize the behavior of the entire RF system (klystron, waveguides, high power splitters, accelerator cavity, etc.). This characterization feature can be used to measure the performance of the closed loop system with respect to the open loop system, to provide an automated way to set loop parameters, to determine the cavity Q-curve, and to detect any abnormal behavior in the RF chain. The types of measurements include frequency and time-domain responses to given perturbations, amplitude modulations, etc. This paper will discuss types of algorithms that can be implemented and present a description and block diagram of the electronics to be used.
Date: December 31, 1998
Creator: Regan, A.H.; Balleyguier, P. & Ziomek, C.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Wake field effect analysis in APT linac

Description: The 1.7-GeV 100-mA CW proton linac is now under design for the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) Project. The APT linac comprises both the normal conducting (below 211 MeV) and superconducting (SC) sections. The high current leads to stringent restrictions on allowable beam losses (< 1 nA/m), that requires analyzing carefully all possible loss sources. While wake-field effects are usually considered negligible in proton linacs, the authors study these effects for the APT to exclude potential problems at such a high current. Loss factors and resonance frequency spectra of various discontinuities of the vacuum chamber are investigated, both analytically and using 2-D and 3-D simulation codes with a single bunch as well as with many bunches. The main conclusion is that the only noticeable effect is the HOM heating of the 5-cell SC cavities. It, however, has an acceptable level and, in addition, will be taken care of by HOM couplers.
Date: December 31, 1998
Creator: Kurennoy, S.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Hazard surveillance for workplace magnetic fields. 1: Walkaround sampling method for measuring ambient field magnitude; 2: Field characteristics from waveform measurements

Description: Recent epidemiologic research has suggested that exposure to extremely low frequency (ELF) magnetic fields (MF) may be associated with leukemia, brain cancer, spontaneous abortions, and Alzheimer`s disease. A walkaround sampling method for measuring ambient ELF-MF levels was developed for use in conducting occupational hazard surveillance. This survey was designed to determine the range of MF levels at different industrial facilities so they could be categorized by MF levels and identified for possible subsequent personal exposure assessments. Industries were selected based on their annual electric power consumption in accordance with the hypothesis that large power consumers would have higher ambient MFs when compared with lower power consumers. Sixty-two facilities within thirteen 2-digit Standard Industrial Classifications (SIC) were selected based on their willingness to participate. A traditional industrial hygiene walkaround survey was conducted to identify MF sources, with a special emphasis on work stations.
Date: March 1, 1998
Creator: Methner, M.M. & Bowman, J.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Electromagnetic Fields Due to a Loop Current in a CasedBorehole Surrounded by Uniform Whole Space

Description: Precise evaluation of electromagnetic (EM) response in steel-cased borehole is an essential first step towards developing techniques for casing parameter evaluation, which would ultimately help evaluating the formation response. In this report we demonstrate a numerical scheme for accurately computing EM responses in cased borehole environment. For improved numerical accuracy we use explicit representations of the electromagnetic spectra inside the borehole, in the casing, and in the formation. Instead of conventional Hankel transform, FFT is used to improve the numerical accuracy. The FFT approach allows us to compute fields at positions very close to the source loop, including the center of the transmitter loop.
Date: January 1998
Creator: Lee, K. H. & Song, Y.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A nonlinear particle dynamics map of wakefield acceleration in a linear collider

Description: The performance of a wakefield accelerator in a high energy collider application is analyzed. In order to carry out this task, it is necessary to construct a strawman design system (no matter how preliminary) and build a code of the systems approach. A nonlinear dynamics map built on a simple theoretical model of the wakefield generated by the laser pulse (or whatever other method) is obtained and they employ this as a base for building a system with multi-stages (and components) as a high energy collider. The crucial figures of merit for such a system other than the final energy include the emittance (that determines the luminosity). The more complex the system is, the more opportunities the system has to degrade the emittance (or entropy of the beam). Thus the map gu ides one to identify where the crucial elements lie that affect the emittance. They find that a strong focusing force of the wakefield coupled with a possible jitter of the axis (or laser aiming) of each stage and a spread in the betatron frequencies arising from different phase space positions for individual particles leads to a phase space mixing. This sensitively controls the emittance degradation. They show that in the case of a uniform plasma the effect of emittance growth is large and may cause serious problems. They discuss possibilities to avoid it and control the situation.
Date: August 1, 1998
Creator: Tajima, T.; Cheshkov, S.; Horton, W. & Yokoya, K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Ultra-sensitive sensors for weak electromagnetic fields using high-{Tc} SQUIDS for biomagnetism, NDE, and corrosion currents

Description: This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The research has directly contributed to a new DOE supported project, three patents (one granted and two submitted), and several potential opportunities for new program funding at the Laboratory. The authors report significant developments extending from basic understanding of and fabrication techniques for high critical-temperature (high-{Tc}) SQUID devices to the development of high-level applications such as the SQUID Microscope. The development of ramp edge geometry and silver-doped YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x} (YBCO) electrodes has tremendously improved the performance of high-{Tc} SQUIDS. Recent experiments have proven and quantified the LANL-patented superconducting imaging plane gradiometry concept. A SQUID microscope, developed largely under this project, has recently acquired data that demonstrated exceptional sensitivity a nd resolution. New techniques for background noise suppression, needed to use the extraordinarily sensitive SQUID sensors in unshielded environments, have also been developed. Finally, initial investigations to use SQUIDs in a basic physics experiment to measure the electric dipole moment of the neutron were very successful.
Date: November 1, 1998
Creator: Kraus, R.H. Jr.; Flynn, E.R.; Espy, M.; Jia, Q.X.; Wu, X.D. & Reagor, D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Particle dynamics and its consequences in wakefield acceleration in a high energy collider

Description: The performance of a wakefield accelerator in a high energy collider application is analyzed by use of a nonlinear dynamics map built on a simple theoretical model of the wakefield generated by the laser pulse (or whatever other method) and a code based on this map. The crucial figures of merit for such a system other than the final energy include the emittance (that determines the luminosity). The more complex the system is, the more opportunities the system has to degrade the emittance (or entropy of the beam). This the map guides one to identify where the crucial elements lie that affect the emittance. If the focusing force of the wakefield is strong when there is a jitter in the position (or laser aiming) of each stage coupled with the spread in the individual particle betatron frequencies, particles experience a phase space mixing. This effect sensitively controls the emittance degradation. They investigate these effects both in a uniform plasma and in a plasma channel. They also study the effect of beam loading. Further, they briefly consider collision point physics issues for a collider expected or characteristic of such a construction based on a scenario for the multi-staged wakefield accelerators.
Date: September 1, 1998
Creator: Cheshkov, S.; Tajima, T.; Horton, W. & Yokoya, K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Electromagnetic Interactions GEneRalized (EIGER): Algorithm abstraction and HPC implementation

Description: Modern software development methods combined with key generalizations of standard computational algorithms enable the development of a new class of electromagnetic modeling tools. This paper describes current and anticipated capabilities of a frequency domain modeling code, EIGER, which has an extremely wide range of applicability. In addition, software implementation methods and high performance computing issues are discussed.
Date: June 1, 1998
Creator: Sharpe, R.M.; Grant, J.B.; Champagne, N.J.; Wilton, D.R.; Jackson, D.R.; Johnson, W.A. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Partial discharge in a high voltage experimental test assembly

Description: This study was initiated when a new type of breakdown occurred in a high voltage experimental test assembly. An anomalous current pulse was observed, which indicated partial discharges, some leading to total breakdowns. High voltage insulator defects are shown along with their effect on the electrostatic fields in the breakdown region. OPERA electromagnetic field modeling software is used to calculate the fields and present a cause for the discharge. Several design modifications are investigated and one of the simplest resulted in a 25% decrease in the field at the discharge surface.
Date: July 1, 1998
Creator: Koss, R.J. & Brainard, J.P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Computer modeling of electromagnetic edge containment in twin-roll casting

Description: This paper presents modeling studies of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) analysis in twin-roll casting. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Inland Steel Company have worked together to develop a 3-D computer model that can predict eddy currents, fluid flows, and liquid metal containment for an electromagnetic (EM) edge containment device. This mathematical model can greatly shorten casting research on the use of EM fields for liquid metal containment and control. It can also optimize the existing casting processes and minimize expensive, time-consuming full-scale testing. The model was verified by comparing predictions with experimental results of liquid-metal containment and fluid flow in EM edge dams designed at Inland Steel for twin-roll casting. Numerical simulation was performed by coupling a three-dimensional (3-D) finite-element EM code (ELEKTRA) and a 3-D finite-difference fluids code (CaPS-EM) to solve Maxwell`s equations, Ohm`s law, Navier-Stokes equations, and transport equations of turbulence flow in a casting process that uses EM fields. ELEKTRA is able to predict the eddy-current distribution and electromagnetic forces in complex geometry. CaPS-EM is capable of modeling fluid flows with free-surfaces and dynamic rollers. The computed 3-D magnetic fields and induced eddy currents in ELEKTRA are used as input to flow-field computations in CaPS-EM. Results of the numerical simulation compared well with measurements obtained from both static and dynamic tests.
Date: July 1, 1998
Creator: Chang, F.C.; Turner, L.R.; Hull, J.R.; Wang, Y.H. & Blazek, K.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Formal solution for the fields within a beam-bug calibrator

Description: For some time I was bothered by the fact that measurements of offsets in the various bug calibration setups never agreed with the simple formulae (2) used for determining electron beam position in the Livermore induction linacs and transport systems. About 1983 I realized that the discrepancy arises from the way the bug calibrator simulates an electron beam in a conducting pipe. At that time I solved the problem using the method presented here. Unfortunately, I did not write it up at that time. After considerable effort, I was able to repeat the calculation. Since I have little confidence that after a few years I could ever do it again, I felt obliged to write it up in some detail. Our beam bug calibrator consists of two conducting cylinders, nominally concentric, that simulate the electron beam within a drift tube. The radii of the larger cylinder is 2.3 times that of the smaller giving an electrical impedance of 50 Ohms to the coaxial combination. To simulate a beam off-axis within a drift tube, the inner tube is moved relative to the outer tube. This only approximately simulates the motion of a beam because the surface current on the inner tube redistributes in response to the translation. Fortunately, the fields of the translated inner cylinder can be found exactly using complex variable theory (1).
Date: July 13, 1998
Creator: Fessenden, T J
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Introduction to collective instabilities----longitudinal and transverse

Description: These topics are covered: 1 Wakes and impedances 1.1 Wake functions 1.2 Coupling impedances 2 Longitudinal phase space 2.1 Equations of motion 2.2 Vlasov equation 3 Potential-well distortion 4 Longitudinal microwave instability 4.1 Dispersion relation 4.2 Landau damping 4.3 Self-bunching 4.4 Overshoot and bunch lengthening 4.5 Observation 5 Longitudinal coupled-bunch instabilities 5.1 Sacherer integral equation 5.2 Time domain 5.3 Rf-detuning and Robinson's stability criteria 6 Transverse instabilities 6.1 Sacherer integral equation 6.2 Solution of Sacherer integral equations 6.1 Sacherer sinusoidal modes of excitation 6.2 Chromaticity frequency shift 7 Transverse coupled-bunch instabilities 7.1 Resistive wall 7.2 Narrow resonances 8 Head-tail instabilities 9 Mode-mixing 9.1 Transverse 9.2 Longitudinal. Exercises are included.
Date: October 1, 1998
Creator: Ng, King-Yuen
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department