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Energy stability in recirculating, energy-recovering linacs

Description: Recirculating, energy-recovering linacs can be used as driver accelerators for high power FELs. Instabilities which arise from fluctuations of the cavity fields are investigated. Energy changes can cause beam loss on apertures, or, when coupled to M{sub 56}, phase oscillations. Both effects change the beam induced voltage in the cavities and can lead to unstable variations of the accelerating field. Stability analysis for small perturbations from equilibrium is performed and threshold currents are determined. Furthermore, the analytical model is extended to include amplitude and phase feedback, with the transfer function in the feedback path presently modeled as a low-pass filter. The feedback gain and bandwidth required for stability are calculated for the high power UV FEL proposed for construction at CEBAF. 4 refs.
Date: July 1, 1996
Creator: Merminga, L.; Bisognano, J.J. & Delayen, J.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Subspace angles: a metric for comparisons in EEG and MEG

Description: In forward head modeling, various approximations are made in order to keep the problem tractable. Simplifications can yield models ranging from simple spherical models to multi-tessellated arbitrary surfaces in a boundary element model (BEM). Spherical head models differ in the number of shells and the assumed conductivities. Other assumptions in the BEM include the choice of basis sets, such as constant, linear, or quadratic variations of the voltages across the individual areal elements, or the selection of error-weighting method, such as collocation, Galerkin, or `direct` methods. Numerical versus analytic integration can also yield numerical differences. These differences in parameters and approximations can yield models whose external fields (EEG potentials or MEG magnetic fields) differ for the same internal source configuration. Quantitative measures are needed to determine if these differences are significant.
Date: July 1, 1996
Creator: Mosher, J. C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Multiphoton processes in the field of two-frequency circularly polarized plane electromagnetic waves

Description: The authors solve Dirac`s equation for an electron in the field of a two-frequency plane electromagnetic wave, deriving general formulae for the probabilities of radiation of a photon by the electron, and for the probabilities for pair production by a photon when the two-frequency wave is circularly polarized. In contrast to the case of a monochromatic-plane electromagnetic wave, when an electron is in the field of a two-frequency circularly polarized wave, besides the absorption of multiphotons and emission of simple harmonics of the individual waves, stimulated multiphoton emission processes and various composite harmonic-photon emission processes are occurred: when a high-energy photon is in a such a field, multiphoton processes also follow the pair production processes.
Date: July 1, 1997
Creator: Yu, An & Takahashi, H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Wakefield and the diffraction model due to a flat beam moving past a conducting wedge

Description: A collimator is often used to clean a beam of its excessive tail particles. If the beam intensity is high enough or if the beam is brought too close to the collimator, however, the wakefields generated by the beam-collimator interaction can cause additional beam tails to grow, thus defeating, or even worsening, the beam-tail cleaning process. The wakefield generated by a sheet beam moving past a conducting wedge has been obtained in closed form by Henke using the method of conformal mapping. This result is applied in the present work to obtain the wake force and the transverse kick received by a test charge moving with the beam. For the beam to be approximated as sheet beams, it is assumed to be flat and the collimator is assumed to have an infinite extent in the flat dimention. We derive an exact expression for the transverse wake force delivered to particles in the beam bunch. Implication of emittance growth as a beam passes closely by a collimator is discussed. We consider two idealized wedge geometries: In Section 2, when the wedge has the geometry as a disrupted beam pipe, and in Section 3, when it is like a semi-infinite screen. Unfortunately, we do not have solutions for more realistic collimator geometries such as when it is tapered to minimize the wakefield effects. However, our results should still serve as pessimistic limiting cases. An interesting opportunity is offered by our exact calculation of the wakefields: it can be used to confront the diffraction model used to estimate the high-frequency impedance of a cavity structure. It is shown that the field pattern, as well as the impedance, agrees with those obtained by the diffraction model in appropriate limits.
Date: July 1, 1995
Creator: Chao, A.W. & Henke, H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Beam dynamics enhancement due to accelerating field symmetrization in the BNL/SLAC/UCLA 1.6 cell S-band photocathode RF gun

Description: A 1.6 cell photocathode S-Band gun developed by the BNL/SLAC/UCLA collaboration is now in operation at the Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility (ATF). One of the main features of this RF gun is the symmetrization of the RF coupling iris with an identical vacuum pumping port located in the full cell. The effects of the asymmetry caused by the RF coupling iris were experimentally investigated by positioning a metallic plunger at the back wall of the vacuum port iris. The higher order modes produced were studied using electron beamlets with 8-fold symmetry. The 8-fold beamlets were produced by masking the laser beam. These experimental results indicate that the integrated electrical center and the geometrical center of the gun are within 175 {micro}m. Which is within the laser alignment tolerance of 250 {micro}m.
Date: July 1997
Creator: Palmer, D. T.; Miller, R. H.; Wang, X. J. & Ben-Zvi, I.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The integral equation for a high gain FEL

Description: The theory of a high gain free electron laser (FEL) is now well developed. In this paper I derive the equation for the electron distribution function, which is valid for FELs with a longitudinally inhomogeneous magnetic system (which may include, in particular, dispersive sections, quadrupole lenses, and simply empty spaces between the undulator sections), magnetic field errors in undulators, and some other options. The integral form of the equation may be useful for numerical calculations.
Date: July 1, 1996
Creator: Vinokurov, N.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Dispersion in the presence of strong transverse wakefields

Description: To minimize emittance growth in a long linac, it is necessary to control the wakefields by correcting the beam orbit excursions. In addition, the particle energy is made to vary along the length of the bunch to introduce a damping, known as the BNS damping, to the beam break-up effect. In this paper, the authors use a two-particle model to examine the relative magnitudes of the various orbit and dispersion functions involved. The results are applied to calculate the effect of a closed orbit bump and a misaligned structure. It is shown that wake-induced dispersion is an important contribution to the beam dynamics in long linacs with strong wakefields like SLC.
Date: July 1, 1997
Creator: Assmann, R. & Chao, A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Beam dynamics in SLC

Description: Beam dynamics issues affect many different aspects of the SLC performance. This paper concentrates on the multi-particle beam dynamics in the linac and the associated limitations that are imposed on the overall SLC performance. The beam behavior in the presence of strong wakefields has been studied in order to optimize the performance and to predict the expected emittances in high performance linacs. Emittance measurements and simulations are presented for the SLAC linac and are compared in detail. As the overall SLC performance depends on the accelerator stability, the tuning stability is discussed. Measurements are shown and the consequences for the performance of the SLC are discussed.
Date: July 1, 1997
Creator: Assmann, R.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Electroseismic characterization of lithology and fluid type in the shallow subsurface. Final report, January 15, 1995--January 14, 1997

Description: The U.S. Department of Energy funded the M.I.T. Earth Resources Laboratory to investigate electroseismic phenomena. Because electroseismic phenomena in fluid-saturated porous media provide geophysicists with a unique opportunity to detect a seismic-wave-generated flow of pore fluid with respect to the porous matrix. The term {open_quotes}electroseismic{close_quotes} describes phenomena in which a seismic wave induces an electrical field or causes radiation of an electromagnetic wave. Electroseismic phenomena take place in fluid-saturated porous rocks, because the pore fluid carries an excess electrical charge. When the charged pore fluid is forced to flow through the rock by pressure gradients within a seismic wave, a streaming electrical current is generated. This electrical current results in charge separation, which induces an electrical field. Measuring this seismic-wave-induced electrical field allows detection of the fluid flow generated by the wave in the porous medium. In turn, detecting the fluid flow allows characterization of fluid transport properties of the medium. The major contribution of our research is in the following three areas: (1) Theory. Theoretical models of various electroseismic phenomena in fluid-saturated porous media were developed. Numerical algorithms were developed for modeling electroseismic measurements in surface (Paper 1 in this report) and VSP (Paper 2) geometries. A closed-form analytical expression was obtained for the logging geometry (Paper 8). The major result is the theoretical models` prediction that porosity, permeability, and fluid chemistry can be characterized using electroseismic measurements; (2) Laboratory Experiments. A number of laboratory experiments were performed in surface (Paper 4), VSP (Paper 4), and logging (Paper 5) geometries. In addition, conversion of electrical energy into seismic energy was investigated (Paper 6), and (3) Field Measurements.
Date: July 1, 1997
Creator: Haartsen, M.W.; Mikhailov, O.V. & Queen, J.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Electromagnetic fields in cased borehole

Description: Borehole electromagnetic (EM) measurements, using fiberglass-cased boreholes, have proven useful in oil field reservoir characterization and process monitoring (Wilt et al., 1995). It has been presumed that these measurements would be impossible in steel-cased wells due to the very large EM attenuation and phase shifts. Recent laboratory and field studies have indicated that detection of EM signals through steel casing should be possible at low frequencies, and that these data provide a reasonable conductivity image at a useful scale. Thus, we see an increased application of this technique to mature oilfields, and an immediate extension to geothermal industry as well. Along with the field experiments numerical model studies have been carried out for analyzing the effect of steel casing to the EM fields. The model used to be an infinitely long uniform casing embedded in a homogeneous whole space. Nevertheless, the results indicated that the formation signal could be accurately recovered if the casing characteristics were independently known (Becker et al., 1998; Lee el al., 1998). Real steel-cased wells are much more complex than the simple laboratory models used in work to date. The purpose of this study is to develop efficient numerical methods for analyzing EM fields in realistic settings, and to evaluate the potential application of EM technologies to cross-borehole and single-hole environment for reservoir characterization and monitoring.
Date: July 20, 2001
Creator: Lee, Ki Ha; Kim, Hee Joon & Uchida, Toshihiro
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A CYLINDRICALLY SYMMETRIC UNIAXIAL PML MAXWELL SOLVER FOR TRANSIENT ATMOSPHERIC ELECTRICITY SIMULATIONS

Description: The recent interest in high altitude discharges known as red sprites, blue jets, and elves has stimulated the modeling of transient atmospheric electricity. The modeling of these high altitude discharges require an initiating cloud-to-ground or intracloud lightning event in order to pre-condition the electric field between the cloud tops and the ionosphere. In this short paper we describe a finite difference time domain (FDTD) numerical solution of Maxwell's equations based on the Yee (Yee 1966) algorithm coupled with a uniaxial perfectly matched layer (PML, Berenger 1994) boundary treatment. The PML theory has advanced considerably since its original formulation in cartesian coordinates for lossless media, and is computationally efficient to implement. Another boundary treatment possibility for our sources that produce radiative and electrostatic fields, which we do not consider here, is a multipole expansion in the time domain for the electromagnetic fields.
Date: July 1, 2001
Creator: SYMBALISTY, E. M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

NONLINEAR ATOM OPTICS

Description: This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project objectives were to explore theoretically various aspects of nonlinear atom optics effects in cold-atom waves and traps. During the project a major development occurred the observation, by as many as a dozen experimental groups, of Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) in cold-atom traps. This stimulated us to focus our attention on those aspects of nonlinear atom optics relating to BEC, in addition to continuing our work on a nonequilibrium formalism for dealing with the interaction of an electromagnetic field with multi-level atomic systems, allowing for macroscopic coherence effects such as BEC. Studies of several problems in BEC physics have been completed or are near completion, including the suggested use of external electric fields to modify the nature of the interatomic interaction in cold-atom traps; properties of two-phase condensates; and molecular loss processes associated with BEC experiments involving a so-called Feshbach resonance.
Date: July 1, 1999
Creator: MILONNI, T.; CSANAK, G. & AL, ET
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Theoretical exploration of Josephson Plasma Emission in Intrinsic Josephson Junctions

Description: In this paper, the authors theoretically predict the best efficient way for electromagnetic wave emission by Josephson plasma excitation in intrinsic Josephson junctions. First, they briefly derive basic equations describing dynamics of phase differences inside junction sites in intrinsic Josephson junctions, and review the nature of Josephson plasma excitation modes based on the equations. Especially, they make an attention to that Josephson plasma modes have much different dispersion relations depending on the propagating directions and their different modes can be recognized as N standing waves propagating along ah-plane in cases of finite stacked systems composed of N junctions. Second, they consider how to excite their modes and point out that excitations of in-phase mode with the highest propagation velocity among their N modes are the most efficient way for electromagnetic wave emissions. Finally, they clarify that in-phase excitations over all junctions are possible by using Josephson vortex flow states. They show simulation results of Josephson vortex flow states resonating with some Josephson plasma modes and predict that superradiance of electromagnetic field may occur in rectangular vortex flow state in which spatiotemporal oscillations of electromagnetic fields are perfectly in-phase.
Date: July 18, 2000
Creator: Tachiki, M. & Machida, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Observation and analysis of static deflections from transverse long-range wakefields in the SLC

Description: In the SLC main linac a train of three bunches is accelerated. The leading positron bunch is followed by two bunches of electrons. When the positron bunch passes off-axis through the Rf structures, it excites dipole modes in the structures, for example long-range transverse wakefields which deflect the subsequent electron bunches. Although the magnitude of the deflections is small one can infer the deflections by measuring the trajectory differences while changing the spacing between the positron and electron bunches. Knowing the positron trajectory the misalignments of the accelerating RF structures with respect to the BPM`s can be calculated. The authors present measurements from the SLC linac and discuss the data analysis and errors.
Date: July 1, 1997
Creator: Assmann, R.W.; Decker, F.J.; Raimondi, P. & Raubenheimer, T.O.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Partial discharge in a high voltage experimental test assembly

Description: This study was initiated when a new type of breakdown occurred in a high voltage experimental test assembly. An anomalous current pulse was observed, which indicated partial discharges, some leading to total breakdowns. High voltage insulator defects are shown along with their effect on the electrostatic fields in the breakdown region. OPERA electromagnetic field modeling software is used to calculate the fields and present a cause for the discharge. Several design modifications are investigated and one of the simplest resulted in a 25% decrease in the field at the discharge surface.
Date: July 1, 1998
Creator: Koss, R.J. & Brainard, J.P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Computer modeling of electromagnetic edge containment in twin-roll casting

Description: This paper presents modeling studies of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) analysis in twin-roll casting. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Inland Steel Company have worked together to develop a 3-D computer model that can predict eddy currents, fluid flows, and liquid metal containment for an electromagnetic (EM) edge containment device. This mathematical model can greatly shorten casting research on the use of EM fields for liquid metal containment and control. It can also optimize the existing casting processes and minimize expensive, time-consuming full-scale testing. The model was verified by comparing predictions with experimental results of liquid-metal containment and fluid flow in EM edge dams designed at Inland Steel for twin-roll casting. Numerical simulation was performed by coupling a three-dimensional (3-D) finite-element EM code (ELEKTRA) and a 3-D finite-difference fluids code (CaPS-EM) to solve Maxwell`s equations, Ohm`s law, Navier-Stokes equations, and transport equations of turbulence flow in a casting process that uses EM fields. ELEKTRA is able to predict the eddy-current distribution and electromagnetic forces in complex geometry. CaPS-EM is capable of modeling fluid flows with free-surfaces and dynamic rollers. The computed 3-D magnetic fields and induced eddy currents in ELEKTRA are used as input to flow-field computations in CaPS-EM. Results of the numerical simulation compared well with measurements obtained from both static and dynamic tests.
Date: July 1, 1998
Creator: Chang, F.C.; Turner, L.R.; Hull, J.R.; Wang, Y.H. & Blazek, K.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Investigation of charge transport and electromagnetic effects in advanced microelectronics and optoelectronics

Description: This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The next generation of electronic microchips will utilize components with sub-micron feature size and optoelectronic devices with picosecond response time. Fundamental understanding of the device performance can only be obtained through first principles physics modeling of charge transport and electromagnetic effects in realistic geometries with material interfaces and dispersive properties. We have developed a general model incorporating important physics such as charge transport processes in materials with multilevel band structures and electromagnetic effects to simulate device characteristics. Accurate treatment of material interfaces and boundaries is included. The Monte Carlo charge transport is coupled self-consistently to Maxwell`s equations to accurately model scattering processes in the presence of an externally biased potential. This detailed multidimensional simulation capability is compared with and verified by experimental data, and could become an industrial standard for benchmarking and improving the {open_quotes}reduced model{close_quotes} codes used for semiconductor design. Specific tasks are the extension of existing capabilities in particle-in-cell plasma simulation technique and Monte Carlo charge transport to study the physics of charged particle dynamics in realistic microelectronic devices, such as bipolar semiconductors, heterojunction transistors, and optoelectronic switches. Our approach has been based on the coupled particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo technique, which can simultaneously treat both electromagnetic wave propagation and charged-particle transport.
Date: July 1, 1996
Creator: Kwan, T.; Booth, T. & Gray, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The NASA B-757 HIRF test series: Low power on-the-ground tests

Description: The data acquisition phase of a program intended to provide data for the validation of computational, analytical and experimental for the assessment of electromagnetic effects i n transports, for the checkout of instrumentation for following test programs, and for the support of protection engineering of airborne systems has been completed. Funded by the NASA Fly-By-Light/Power-By-Wire Program, the initial phase involved on-the-ground electromagnetic measurements using the NASA Boeing 757 and was executed in the LESLI Facility at the USAF Phillips Laboratory. The major participants were LLNL, NASA Langley Research Center, Phillips Laboratory, and UIE, Inc. Measurements were made of the fields coupled into the aircraft interior and signals induced in select structures and equipment under controlled illumination by RF fields. A characterization of the ground was also performed to permit ground effects to be included in forthcoming validation exercises. A series of fly-by experiments were conducted in early 1995 in which the NASA B-757 was flown in the vicinity of a Voice of America station ({approximately}25 MHz), a fixed transmitter driving an LP array (172 MHz), and an ASRF radar at Wallops Island (430 MHz). In this paper, the overall test program is defined with particular attention to the on-the-ground portion. It is described in detail with presentation of the test rationale, test layout, and samples of the data. Samples of some inferences from the data that will be useful in protection engineering and EM effects mitigation will also be presented.
Date: July 1, 1995
Creator: Poggio, A.J.; Zacharias, R.A.; Pennock, S.T.; Avalle, C.A. & Carney, H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Formal solution for the fields within a beam-bug calibrator

Description: For some time I was bothered by the fact that measurements of offsets in the various bug calibration setups never agreed with the simple formulae (2) used for determining electron beam position in the Livermore induction linacs and transport systems. About 1983 I realized that the discrepancy arises from the way the bug calibrator simulates an electron beam in a conducting pipe. At that time I solved the problem using the method presented here. Unfortunately, I did not write it up at that time. After considerable effort, I was able to repeat the calculation. Since I have little confidence that after a few years I could ever do it again, I felt obliged to write it up in some detail. Our beam bug calibrator consists of two conducting cylinders, nominally concentric, that simulate the electron beam within a drift tube. The radii of the larger cylinder is 2.3 times that of the smaller giving an electrical impedance of 50 Ohms to the coaxial combination. To simulate a beam off-axis within a drift tube, the inner tube is moved relative to the outer tube. This only approximately simulates the motion of a beam because the surface current on the inner tube redistributes in response to the translation. Fortunately, the fields of the translated inner cylinder can be found exactly using complex variable theory (1).
Date: July 13, 1998
Creator: Fessenden, T J
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A Simple Model for Induction Core Voltage Distributions

Description: In fall 2003 T. Hughes of MRC used a full EM simulation code (LSP) to show that the electric field stress distribution near the outer radius of the longitudinal gaps between the four Metglas induction cores is very nonuniform in the original design of the DARHT-2 accelerator cells. In this note we derive a simple model of the electric field distribution in the induction core region to provide physical insights into this result. The starting point in formulating our model is to recognize that the electromagnetic fields in the induction core region of the DARHT-2 accelerator cells should be accurately represented within a quasi-static approximation because the timescale for the fields to change is much longer than the EM wave propagation time. The difficulty one faces is the fact that the electric field is a mixture of both a ''quasi-magnetostatic field'' (having a nonzero curl, with Bdot the source) and a ''quasi-electrostatic field'' (the source being electric charges on the various metal surfaces). We first discuss the EM field structure on the ''micro-scale'' of individual tape windings in Section 2. The insights from that discussion are then used to formulate a ''macroscopic'' description of the fields inside an ''equivalent homogeneous tape wound core region'' in Section 3. This formulation explicitly separates the nonlinear core magnetics from the quasi-electrostatic components of the electric field. In Section 4 a physical interpretation of the radial dependence of the electrostatic component of the electric field derived from this model is presented in terms of distributed capacitances, and the voltage distribution from gap to gap is related to various ''equivalent'' lumped capacitances. Analytic solutions of several simple multi-core cases are presented in Sections 5 and 6 to help provide physical insight into the effect of various proposed changes in the geometrical parameters of the DARHT-2 ...
Date: July 1, 2004
Creator: Briggs, Richard J. & Fawley, William M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Electromagnetic field analysis of septum magnet for APS positron accumulator ring

Description: This report consists of three parts. The first part describes a numerical analysis method for the electromagnetic field analysis of a septum magnet. A novel improvement to the treatment of exciting currents in the time-domain is proposed. The second part discusses numerical predictions of the electromagnetic characteristics of the APS PAR septum. The time variations of stray field and eddy currents are shown for three magnet designs. The last part explores how decreasing the septum material conductivity affects the stray field. The decrease of conductivity may be caused by an inadequate manufacturing of the septum material. The significance of a high quality septum, or flat interface between copper and iron, is emphasized from a point of view of stray field. An ideal method for joining two different metals without distortion, called HIP (Hot Isostatic Pressing), is introduced and recommended based on the authors` experience.
Date: July 1, 1995
Creator: Yokoi, Toshiaki & Turner, L.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Dynamic Model for Electromagnetic Field and Heating Patterns in Loaded Cylindrical Cavities

Description: An analytical solution for the electromagnetic fields in a cylindrical cavity, partially filled with a cylindrical dielectric has been recently reported. A program based on this solution has been developed and combined with the authors` previous program for heat transfer analysis. The new software has been used to simulate the dynamic temperature profiles of microwave heating and to investigate the role of electromagnetic field in heating uniformity and stability. The effects of cavity mode, cavity dimension, the dielectric properties of loads on electromagnetic field and heating patterns can be predicted using this software.
Date: July 1, 1995
Creator: Tian, Y. L.; Black, W. M.; Sa`adaldin, H. S.; Ahmad, I. & Silberglitt, R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Direct time-domain techniques for transient radiation and scattering. [Introduction to transient electromagnetics]

Description: A tutorial introduction to transient electromagnetics, focusing on direct time-domain techniques, is presented. Physical, mathematical, numerical, and experimental aspects of time-domain methods, with emphasis on wire objects excited as antennas or scatters are examined. Numerous computed examples illustrate the characteristics of direct time-domain procedures, especially where they may offer advantages over procedures in the more familiar frequency domain. These advantages include greater solution efficiency for many types of problems, the ability to handle nonlinearities, improved physical insight and interpretability, availability of wide-band information from a single calculation, and the possibility of isolating interactions among various parts of an object using time-range gating.
Date: July 1, 1976
Creator: Miller, E.K. & Landt, J.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department