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Fairness in Asbestos Injury Resolution Act of 2004 (S. 2290, 108th Congress)

Description: This report provides an overview of S. 2290, 108th Congress, the Fairness in Asbestos Injury Resolution Act of 2004 (or FAIR Act of 2004). The bill is a revised version of S. 1125, 108th Congress, and would create the Office of Asbestos Disease Compensation to award damages to asbestos claimants on a no-fault basis. Asbestos claims could no longer be filed or pursued under state law, except for the enforcement of judgments no longer subject to any appeal or judicial review before the date of enactment of the bill.
Date: April 14, 2004
Creator: Cohen, Henry
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Understanding How Jurors Award Civil Damages: A Test of Affect Control Theory

Description: This dissertation examines predictors of juror-determined damage awards among 377 juror eligible mock jurors. Citizens reporting for jury duty in a large metropolitan county on five days when the study was conducted were invited to participate. Scenarios were created that varied both case facts and witness emotion during trial testimony. Results indicate that Affect Control Theory can be applied to the situation of juror-determined damage awards and is helpful in scientifically explaining some of the variation of both compensatory and punitive damage awards.
Date: August 2004
Creator: McDonald, Emily
Partner: UNT Libraries

A comparison of DNA damage probes in two HMEC lines with X-irradiation

Description: In this study, we investigated {gamma}H2AX{sup ser139} and 53BP1{sup ser25}, DNA damage pathway markers, to observe responses to radiation insult. Two Human Mammary Epithelial Cell (HMEC) lines were utilized to research the role of immortalization in DNA damage marker expression, HMEC HMT-3522 (S1) with an infinite lifespan, and a subtype of HMEC 184 (184V) with a finite lifespan. Cells were irradiated with 50 cGy X-rays, fixed with 4% paraformaldehyde after 1 hour repair at 37 C, and processed through immunofluorescence. Cells were visualized with a fluorescent microscope and images were digitally captured using Image-Pro Plus software. The 184V irradiated cells exhibited a more positive punctate response within the nucleus for both DNA damage markers compared to the S1 irradiated cells. We will expand the dose and time course in future studies to augment the preliminary data from this research. It is important to understand whether the process of transformation to immortalization compromises the DNA damage sensor and repair process proteins of HMECs in order to understand what is 'normal' and to evaluate the usefulness of cell lines as experimental models.
Date: January 19, 2007
Creator: Wisnewski, Christy L.; Bjornstad, Kathleen A.; Rosen, ChristoperJ.; Chang, Polly Y. & Blakely, Eleanor A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Supreme Court Accepts Five Environmental Cases During Its 2008-2009 Term

Description: In the Supreme Court's 2008-2009 term, which likely will conclude in late June, 2009, the Court has accepted for argument five environmental cases--an unusually large number out of the roughly 85 cases accepted for argument. The reason for this interest in environmental cases at this particular time is speculative; the Court generally does not explain why it accepts cases. This report reviews the cases, decided and undecided, and then briefly comments.
Date: February 27, 2009
Creator: Meltz, Robert
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Nonhomologous Mechanisms of Repair of Chromosomal Breaks

Description: Discovered three new proteins involved in DNA damage assessment. Interestingly they are all proteins involved in recombination, but they have very different roles in that process and other proteins that might be expected to be equivalently involved are not. This is developing into a very significant area of research.
Date: December 19, 2001
Creator: Haber, J. E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Supreme Court Accepts Five Environmental Cases During Its 2008-2009 Term

Description: In the Supreme Court's 2008-2009 term, which likely will conclude in late June, 2009, the Court has accepted for argument five environmental cases—an unusually large number out of the roughly 85 cases accepted for argument. The reason for this interest in environmental cases at this particular time is speculative; the Court generally does not explain why it accepts cases. This report reviews the cases, decided and undecided, and then briefly comments.
Date: February 27, 2009
Creator: Meltz, Robert
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

[Woman with fire-damaged property]

Description: A woman works with fire-damaged property in Ringgold. On January 1, 2006, the Texas town of Ringgold was devastated in a fire that forced thousands of people to evacuate several towns in North Texas. Around 32 houses were destroyed in Ringgold, a ranching town of about 250 people.
Date: January 4, 2006
Creator: Castillo, José L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[Man examines fire-damaged property]

Description: A man wearing a baseball cap and glasses examines fire-damaged property in Ringgold. On January 1, 2006, the Texas town of Ringgold was devastated in a fire that forced thousands of people to evacuate several towns in North Texas. Around 32 houses were destroyed in Ringgold, a ranching town of about 250 people. Mr. Castillo provided this information about this photo: Reyes Morales, de 48 años de edadbusca algunas de sus pertenencias de entre los escombros de lo que quedó de su vivienda destruida por el fuego que arrasó la localidad de Ringgold, a 180 Km al norte de Dallas (Texas). Morales perdió todos sus bienes materiales y espera la ayuda del gobierno para reconstruir su casa y su vida.
Date: January 4, 2006
Creator: Castillo, José L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[Woman helping to clean-up after the fire]

Description: A woman wearing a baseball cap helps to clean-up fire-damaged property after the Ringgold fire. On January 1, 2006, the Texas town of Ringgold was devastated in a fire that forced thousands of people to evacuate several towns in North Texas. Around 32 houses were destroyed in Ringgold, a ranching town of about 250 people. Mr. Castillo provided this information about this photo: María Morales, de 48 años, trata de recobrar algunas pertenencias de entre los escombros en el lugar en donde residía y que fue destruido por las llamas de un fuego en la localidad de Ringgold, a 100 millas al norte de Fort Worth.
Date: January 4, 2006
Creator: Castillo, José L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[Scorched soccer ball]

Description: Photograph of a fire-damaged soccer ball with a man working in the background. On January 1, 2006, the Texas town of Ringgold was devastated in a fire that forced thousands of people to evacuate several towns in North Texas. Around 32 houses were destroyed in Ringgold, a ranching town of about 250 people.
Date: January 4, 2006
Creator: Castillo, José L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[Man holding scorched soccer ball]

Description: A Hispanic man wearing a baseball cap and standing next to a soccer goal, holds up a fire-scorched soccer ball. On January 1, 2006, the Texas town of Ringgold was devastated in a fire that forced thousands of people to evacuate several towns in North Texas. Around 32 houses were destroyed in Ringgold, a ranching town of about 250 people.
Date: January 4, 2006
Creator: Castillo, José L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[Man surveying fire damage]

Description: A Hispanic man wearing a baseball cap and protective eyewear surveys property that has been damaged in the Ringgold fire. On January 1, 2006, the Texas town of Ringgold was devastated in a fire that forced thousands of people to evacuate several towns in North Texas. Around 32 houses were destroyed in Ringgold, a ranching town of about 250 people. Mr. Castillo provided this information about this photo: Reyes Morales, de 48 años de edad, utiliza un tractor para limpiar lo que quedó de su vivienda destruida por el fuego que arrasó la localidad de Ringgold, a 180 Km al norte de Dallas (Texas). Morales perdió todos sus bienes materiales y espera la ayuda del gobierno para reconstruir su casa y su vida.
Date: January 4, 2006
Creator: Castillo, José L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[Man using a shovel in Ringgold after fire]

Description: A man wearing a baseball cap plunges a shovel into the ground. On January 1, 2006, the Texas town of Ringgold was devastated in a fire that forced thousands of people to evacuate several towns in North Texas. Around 32 houses were destroyed in Ringgold, a ranching town of about 250 people.
Date: January 4, 2006
Creator: Castillo, José L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[Ringgold man surveys damage]

Description: A man wearing a baseball cap and glasses surveys property damaged by fire. On January 1, 2006, the Texas town of Ringgold was devastated in a fire that forced thousands of people to evacuate several towns in North Texas. Around 32 houses were destroyed in Ringgold, a ranching town of about 250 people.
Date: January 4, 2006
Creator: Castillo, José L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[Ringgold man with glasses crying]

Description: Close-up of a Hispanic man wearing a baseball cap and glasses crying as he surveys the scorched ground around him. On January 1, 2006, the Texas town of Ringgold was devastated in a fire that forced thousands of people to evacuate several towns in North Texas. Around 32 houses were destroyed in Ringgold, a ranching town of about 250 people. Mr. Castillo provided this information about this photo: Reyes Morales, de 48 años de edad, derrama algunas lágrimas frente a lo que fue su hogar en la localidad de Ringgold, a 180 Km al norte de Dallas (Texas). Morales perdió todos sus bienes materiales y espera la ayuda del gobierno para reconstruir su casa y su vida.
Date: January 4, 2006
Creator: Castillo, José L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[Ringgold man crying]

Description: Close-up of a Hispanic man in a baseball cap crying as he surveys the scorched ground around him. On January 1, 2006, the Texas town of Ringgold was devastated in a fire that forced thousands of people to evacuate several towns in North Texas. Around 32 houses were destroyed in Ringgold, a ranching town of about 250 people. Mr. Castillo provided this information about this photo: Reyes Morales, de 48 años de edad, derrama algunas lágrimas frente a lo que fue su hogar en la localidad de Ringgold, a 180 Km al norte de Dallas (Texas). Morales perdió todos sus bienes materiales y espera la ayuda del gobierno para reconstruir su casa y su vida.
Date: January 4, 2006
Creator: Castillo, José L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[News Clip: Local weather]

Description: B-roll video footage from the KXAS-TV/NBC station in Fort Worth, Texas, to accompany a news story.
Date: October 30, 1979, 6:00 p.m.
Creator: KXAS-TV (Television station : Fort Worth, Tex.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

The Sorcerer II Global Ocean Sampling Expedition: Expanding theUniverse of Protein Families

Description: Metagenomics projects based on shotgun sequencing of populations of micro-organisms yield insight into protein families. We used sequence similarity clustering to explore proteins with a comprehensive dataset consisting of sequences from available databases together with 6.12 million proteins predicted from an assembly of 7.7 million Global Ocean Sampling (GOS) sequences. The GOS dataset covers nearly all known prokaryotic protein families. A total of 3,995 medium- and large-sized clusters consisting of only GOS sequences are identified, out of which 1,700 have no detectable homology to known families. The GOS-only clusters contain a higher than expected proportion of sequences of viral origin, thus reflecting a poor sampling of viral diversity until now. Protein domain distributions in the GOS dataset and current protein databases show distinct biases. Several protein domains that were previously categorized as kingdom specific are shown to have GOS examples in other kingdoms. About 6,000 sequences (ORFans) from the literature that heretofore lacked similarity to known proteins have matches in the GOS data. The GOS dataset is also used to improve remote homology detection. Overall, besides nearly doubling the number of current proteins, the predicted GOS proteins also add a great deal of diversity to known protein families and shed light on their evolution. These observations are illustrated using several protein families, including phosphatases, proteases, ultraviolet-irradiation DNA damage repair enzymes, glutamine synthetase, and RuBisCO. The diversity added by GOS data has implications for choosing targets for experimental structure characterization as part of structural genomics efforts. Our analysis indicates that new families are being discovered at a rate that is linear or almost linear with the addition of new sequences, implying that we are still far from discovering all protein families in nature.
Date: March 23, 2006
Creator: Yooseph, Shibu; Sutton, Granger; Rusch, Douglas B.; Halpern,Aaron L.; Williamson, Shannon J.; Remington, Karin et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Inhibition of TGFbeta1 Signaling Attenutates ATM Activity inResponse to Genotoxic Stress

Description: Ionizing radiation causes DNA damage that elicits a cellular program of damage control coordinated by the kinase activity of ataxia telangiectasia mutated protein (ATM). Transforming growth factor {beta}1 (TGF{beta}), which is activated by radiation, is a potent and pleiotropic mediator of physiological and pathological processes. Here we show that TGF{beta} inhibition impedes the canonical cellular DNA damage stress response. Irradiated Tgf{beta}1 null murine epithelial cells or human epithelial cells treated with a small molecule inhibitor of TGF{beta} type I receptor kinase exhibit decreased phosphorylation of Chk2, Rad17 and p53, reduced {gamma}H2AX radiation-induced foci, and increased radiosensitivity compared to TGF{beta} competent cells. We determined that loss of TGF{beta} signaling in epithelial cells truncated ATM autophosphorylation and significantly reduced its kinase activity, without affecting protein abundance. Addition of TGF{beta} restored functional ATM and downstream DNA damage responses. These data reveal a heretofore undetected critical link between the microenvironment and ATM that directs epithelial cell stress responses, cell fate and tissue integrity. Thus, TGF{beta}1, in addition to its role in homoeostatic growth control, plays a complex role in regulating responses to genotoxic stress, the failure of which would contribute to the development of cancer; conversely, inhibiting TGF{beta} may be used to advantage in cancer therapy.
Date: September 15, 2006
Creator: Kirshner, Julia; Jobling, Michael F.; Pajares, Maria Jose; Ravani, Shraddha A.; Glick, Adam B.; Lavin, Martin J. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Repair of radiation-induced heat-labile sites is independent of DNA-PKcs, XRCC1 or PARP

Description: Ionizing radiation induces a variety of different DNA lesions: in addition to the most critical DNA damage, the DSB, numerous base alterations, SSBs and other modifications of the DNA double-helix are formed. When several non-DSB lesions are clustered within a short distance along DNA, or close to a DSB, they may interfere with the repair of DSBs and affect the measurement of DSB induction and repair. We have previously shown that a substantial fraction of DSBs measured by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) are in fact due to heat-labile sites (HLS) within clustered lesions, thus reflecting an artifact of preparation of genomic DNA at elevated temperature. To further characterize the influence of HLS on DSB induction and repair, four human cell lines (GM5758, GM7166, M059K, U-1810) with apparently normal DSB rejoining were tested for bi-phasic rejoining after gamma irradiation. When heat-released DSBs were excluded from the measurements the fraction of fast rejoining decreased to less than 50% of the total. However, neither the half-times of the fast (t{sub 1/2} = 7-8 min) or slow (t{sub 1/2} = 2.5 h) DSB rejoining were changed significantly. At t=0 the heat-released DSBs accounted for almost 40% of the DSBs, corresponding to 10 extra DSB/cell/Gy in the initial DSB yield. These heat-released DSBs were repaired within 60-90 min in all tested cells, including M059K cells treated with wortmannin or DNA-PKcs defect M059J cells. Furthermore, cells lacking XRCC1 or Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) rejoined both total DSBs and heat-released DSBs similar to normal cells. In summary, the presence of heat-labile sites have a substantial impact on DSB induction yields and DSB rejoining rates measured by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, and HLS repair is independent of DNA-PKcs, XRCC1 and PARP.
Date: April 29, 2008
Creator: Stenerlöw, Bo; Karlsson, Karin H.; Radulescu, Irina; Rydberg, Bjorn & Stenerlow, Bo
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Use of Computational Modeling to Evaluate Hypotheses About the Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms of Bystander Effects

Description: This report describes the development of a computational systems biology approach to evaluate the hypotheses of molecular and cellular mechanisms of adaptive response to low dose ionizing radiation. Our concept is that computational models of signaling pathways can be developed and linked to biologically based dose response models to evaluate the underlying molecular mechanisms which lead to adaptive response. For development of quantitatively accurate, predictive models, it will be necessary to describe tissues consisting of multiple cell types where the different types each contribute in their own way to the overall function of the tissue. Such a model will probably need to incorporate not only cell type-specific data but also spatial information on the architecture of the tissue and on intercellular signaling. The scope of the current model was more limited. Data obtained in a number of different biological systems were synthesized to describe a chimeric, “average” population cell. Biochemical signaling pathways involved in sensing of DNA damage and in the activation of cell cycle checkpoint controls and the apoptotic path were also included. As with any computational modeling effort, it was necessary to develop these simplified initial descriptions (models) that can be iteratively refined. This preliminary model is a starting point which, with time, can evolve to a level of refinement where large amounts of detailed biological information are synthesized and a capability for robust predictions of dose- and time-response behaviors is obtained.
Date: November 21, 2006
Creator: Zhao, Yuchao; Conolly, Rory B & Andersen, Melvin E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Molecular Recognition of DNA Damage Sites by Apurinic/Apyrimidinic Endonucleases

Description: The DNA repair/redox factor AP endonuclease 1 (APE1) is a multifunctional protein which is known to to be essential for DNA repair activity in human cells. Structural/functional analyses of the APE activity is thus been an important research field to assess cellular defense mechanisms against ionizing radiation.
Date: July 28, 2005
Creator: Braun, W. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department