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Commentary on "Frightening Near-Death Experiences"

Description: Abstract: Kenneth Ring and Nancy Evans Bush both wrote papers concerning frightening near-death experiences (NDEs) in the Fall 1994 issue of this Journal. The results of my own research are more supportive of Bush's position than they are of Ring's. This paper gives some of the reasons why and illustrates other data accumulated by me concerning frightening NDEs.
Date: Winter 1996
Creator: Gibson, Arvin S.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Comments on "A Neurobiological Model for Near-Death Experiences"

Description: Article presenting commentary on a neurobiological model proposed by Juan C. Saavedra-Aguilar and Juan S. Gómez-Jeria, which discusses the clinical similarities between temporal lobe seizures and near-death experiences (NDEs). Dr. Morse presents notes regarding his own research with colleagues based on similarities with various neurotransmitters.
Date: Summer 1989
Creator: Morse, Melvin L.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Comments on Stuart Twemlow's "Misidentified Flying Objects? An Integrated Psychodynamic Perspective on Dear-Death Experiences and UFO Abductions"

Description: Abstract: In addition to the hypotheses on UFO abductions and near-death experiences described by Stuart Twemlow, another one has been put forward by researchers over the years that increases the complexity of the question of the reality of these experiences. Furthermore, there is some claimed physical evidence for abductions, while there is none for near-death experiences (NDEs). The exploration of unusual personal changes at the time of an abduction or NDE certainly warrants further attention, but investigators should give the well-being of the experiencer top priority.
Date: Summer 1994
Creator: Basterfield, Keith
Partner: UNT Libraries

Commentary on Jansen's Paper

Description: Abstract: Karl Jansen raises a fundamental and exciting question: Is humankind's consciousness the result of neuronal function, or are there extracerebral aspects as well? While his neurotransmitter model of near-death experiences (NDEs) is well described, I find his supporting evidence weak. Methodological differences between studies of ketamine hallucinations and near-death experiences (NDEs) raise doubts about how similar those experiences are phenomenologically. While Jansen's model has electrifying implications, the data required to support his conclusions do not yet exist.
Date: Autumn 1997
Creator: Morse, Melvin L.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Commentary on Stuart W. Twemlow's "Misidentified Flying Objects?"

Description: Abstract: Stuart Twemlow's article has made an important dual contribution to our thinking about anomalous experiences: first in offering a heuristic psychodynamic model in terms of which to view them, and second, in suggesting a definite link between near-death experiences (NDEs) and unidentified flying object (UFO) abductions. I consider his argument largely from the standpoint of my own recent research, which also brings out the similarities between precisely these same two types of encounters. My empirical findings support many of Twemlow's observations, but important differences are noted between his more psychoanalytic perspective and my imaginal one. My comments conclude with a strong endorsement of Twemlow's therapeutic stance toward anomalous experiences.
Date: Summer 1994
Creator: Ring, Kenneth
Partner: UNT Libraries

Glimpses of Utopia Near Death? A Rejoinder

Description: Abstract: Five scholars have offered comments, suggestions, and criticisms of my paper "Near-Death Experiences and Pursuit of the Ideal Society." In this rejoinder, I reply to those comments and elaborate on aspects of my earlier paper. I discuss issues of methodology, epistemology, validity, logic, and other social considerations with respect to the plausibility of viewing some near-death imagery as utopian. I conclude with some reflections on the social character and study of the near-death experience.
Date: Winter 1991
Creator: Kellehear, Allan
Partner: UNT Libraries

Comments on "The Ketamine Model of the Near-Death Experience: A Central Role for the N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptor"

Description: Abstract: Although ketamine can induce a state similar to a near-death experience (NDE), there is a striking difference between experiences induced by ketamine used in a recreational context and in an operating room. Ketamine is a noncompetitive antagonist of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptro, as is ibogaine, the main alkaloid of a shrub used in Central Africa to induce NDEs in a religious context. Ibogaine can also elicit different experiences when used in a hallucinatory context or in initiatic rituals, where a superficial state of coma is induced. These data raise the question of whether the chemically-induced NDE-like experience is related to the use of a particular kind of substance or to a genuine comatose state.
Date: Autumn 1997
Creator: Bianchi, Antonio
Partner: UNT Libraries

Commentary on "Psychophysiological and Cultural Correlates Undermining a Survivalist Interpretation of Near-Death Experiences"

Description: Abstract: Keith Augustine has provided a legitimate and cogent critique of a transcendental interpretation of near-death experiences, exposing weaknesses in the research methodology, paucity of the data, and gaps in the arguments. He offers evidence from psychophysiological and cultural correlates of NDEs that he interprets as favoring a hallucinatory understanding of these phenomena. however, his analysis relies on idiosyncratic definitions of psychological concepts, reads unidirectional causality into bivariate correlations, and underestimates the empirical predictions of the separation hypothesis. Despite less than compelling evidence for the transcendental hypothesis, it accounts for NDE phenomenology better than the materialist model.
Date: Winter 2007
Creator: Greyson, Bruce
Partner: UNT Libraries

Commentary on Allan Kellehear's "Near-Death Experiences and the Pursuit of the Ideal Society"

Description: Abstract: Allan Kellehear's article raised four questions for me: (1) whether the near-death experience (NDE) presents enough data about the nature of a transcendent society for it to be a useful model for earthly societies; (2) the degree to which transcendent societies have to address the practical considerations of a material society; (3) whether NDEs are projections of experiencers' cultural concepts about the nature of the transcendent realm(s); and (4) the kind of hope offered by the growing awareness of the features of Western NDEs. I address these questions by referring to transcendent realm concepts and NDEs in the anthropological literature, particularly that of the North American Indian Prophet Movement.
Date: Winter 1991
Creator: Mills, Antonia
Partner: UNT Libraries

Comments on Twemlow's Article

Description: Abstract: Stuart Twemlow's argument for a psychodynamic approach to anomalous experiences contains some weaknesses. First, Twemlow argues for a primarily mental model of UFO abductions without addressing the presence of physical evidence in some UFO sightings. This omission may reflect the practical limitations of the therapist's role, which usually does not include fieldwork to collect and analyze corroborative physical evidence. Second, it may be difficult for some experiencers to understand or accept a purely psychodynamic approach. Kenneth Ring's imaginal model, which encompasses Twemlow's basic ideas, is suggested as a practical clinical model.
Date: Summer 1994
Creator: Gotlib, David
Partner: UNT Libraries