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Small Business Subcontracting Report Validation Can Be Improved

Description: Correspondence issued by the General Accounting Office with an abstract that begins "GAO assessed agencies' validation of data submitted by prime contractors on their subcontracting achievements. Of $77 billion in subcontracting reported in fiscal year 2000, $31 billion went to small businesses, such as women-owned, and small disadvantaged businesses, as well as those located in historically underutilized business zones. Both civilian and defense agencies follow a similar process to validate subcontracting data--one that involves visiting contractors, assessing compliance with subcontracting plans, and evaluating accounting systems as well as management support of the subcontracting program. Most contractors GAO reviewed are making good faith efforts to comply with their subcontracting plans. However, these reviews could be improved to enhance the validation and use of subcontracting data."
Date: December 13, 2001
Creator: United States. General Accounting Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Small Business Administration's Implementation of Administrative Provisions in the American Recovery and Reinvesment Act

Description: Correspondence issued by the Government Accountability Office with an abstract that begins "Under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA), Congress required the Small Business Administration (SBA) to implement a total of eight administrative provisions to help facilitate small business lending and enhance liquidity in the secondary markets. These administrative provisions include (1) temporarily requiring SBA to reduce or eliminate certain fees on 7(a) and 504 loans; (2) temporarily increasing the maximum 7(a) guarantee from 85 percent to 90 percent; and (3) implementing provisions designed specifically to facilitate secondary markets, such as extending existing guarantees in the 504 program and making loans to systemically important brokerdealers that operate in the 7(a) secondary market. Further, ARRA established deadlines for SBA to issue regulations that implement certain administrative provisions, such as those pertaining to facilitating secondary market activities. Specifically, ARRA required SBA to issue regulations extending the guarantee related to the 504 program within 15 days after enactment (March 4, 2009) and for making loans to systemically important broker-dealers within 30 days after enactment (March 19, 2009). ARRA also mandates that we report within 60 days after the date of enactment, April 17, 2009, on SBA's initial efforts to comply with these provisions. In response, this report (1) summarizes key activities undertaken by the Administrator of SBA to implement the administrative provisions including establishment of project plans with timelines for fulfilling responsibilities, and (2) analyze whether the Administrator is accomplishing the purpose of increasing liquidity in the secondary markets for SBA loans. Because SBA's efforts are still in their early stages, we agreed with the staffs of the House and Senate Committees on Small Business to focus our work on four key administrative provisions for the purposes of this report. These four provisions are eliminating or reducing fees on 7(a) ...
Date: April 16, 2009
Creator: United States. Government Accountability Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Small Business Tax Compliance Burden

Description: Correspondence issued by the General Accounting Office with an abstract that begins "Pursuant to a congressional request, GAO reviewed the tax compliance burdens of small business taxpayers, focusing on: (1) why the Internal Revenue Service's (IRS) compliance burden estimates are not reliable; (2) why the relationship of the no-change rates to audit rates for small businesses and other individuals is difficult to determine; and (3) why IRS has limited information on its interactions with small businesses."
Date: May 5, 1999
Creator: United States. General Accounting Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

State Department Contract for Security Installation at Embassies Awarded to 8(a) Joint Venture

Description: Correspondence issued by the Government Accountability Office with an abstract that begins "In March 2003, the Department of State (State) awarded a sole-source contract to EmbSEC, a Virginia limited liability corporation, for work at U.S. embassies. The contract currently has a ceiling price of $354 million. The contractor is required to install and maintain technical security equipment, such as alarms, cameras, and controlled-access equipment; establish X-ray capability for special projects; and maintain and repair physical security products. The contractor also procures equipment and materials and operates the warehouse where they are stored. EmbSEC was created as a joint venture, mentor/protege partnership under the Small Business Administration's (SBA) 8(a) business development program. A joint venture in the 8(a) program is an agreement between an 8(a) participant and one or more businesses to work together on a specific 8(a) contract. SBA regulations state that the purpose of the mentor/protege relationship is to enhance the capabilities of the protege and to improve its ability to successfully compete for contracts. The EmbSEC joint venture is comprised of RDR, Inc., the mentor, and BP International (BPI), the protege, an 8(a) firm at the time the contract was awarded. State had awarded 8(a) contracts to RDR for the same type of work in 1992 and 1998. We received a tip on our fraud hotline regarding the EmbSEC contract. The objectives of our review, conducted under the authority of the Comptroller General to conduct evaluations on his own initiative, were to determine (1) State's basis for awarding the contract to EmbSEC without competition and (2) the extent to which SBA has monitored the roles and responsibilities of the companies under the joint venture arrangement. We are sending a separate management letter to State regarding this contract."
Date: November 8, 2006
Creator: United States. Government Accountability Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Interim Report on Internet Gambling

Description: Correspondence issued by the General Accounting Office with an abstract that begins "GAO conducted a study on Internet gambling and the use of credit cards to fund Internet gambling activities. Currently, both state and federal laws apply to Internet gambling in the United States. The Wire Act is the federal statute that has been used to prosecute federal Internet gambling cases. The act prohibits gambling businesses from using interstate or international wires to knowingly receive or send certain types of bets or information that would assist in placing bets. Although the Wire Act has been successfully used to prosecute gambling businesses through the Internet, the statute contains certain ambiguities that may limit its applicability. Two types of credit card organizations handle the four major credit cards issued in the United States. Credit card associations are owned by a large network of member financial institutions, which may approve credit card applications and issue credit cards, approve and sign up merchants to accept the cards, or both. Credit card associations have focused primarily on facilitating the blocking of Internet gambling transactions. Credit card companies have focused primarily on prohibiting Internet gambling sites from becoming credit card merchants."
Date: September 23, 2002
Creator: United States. General Accounting Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

DISH Network Complied with the Court-Appointed Special Master's Examination of Its Compliance with the Section 119 Statutory License

Description: Correspondence issued by the Government Accountability Office with an abstract that begins "GAO found that DISH complied with the Special Master's examination. DISH provided the Special Master with information on its subscribers and royalty payments, and cooperated on a survey of all major network-affiliated broadcast stations nationwide. Since our March 23, 2012, report, the Special Master issued a report noting that there was no substantial evidence of improprieties by DISH regarding the Section 119 statutory license."
Date: December 12, 2012
Creator: United States. Government Accountability Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Reporting of Small Business Contract Awards Does Not Reflect Current Business Size

Description: Correspondence issued by the General Accounting Office with an abstract that begins "We have prepared this report in response to concerns about whether large companies are receiving federal contracts intended for small businesses. We reviewed awards to five large companies to determine (1) how contracts awarded to the companies were reported in Federal Procurement Data System (FPDS), (2) why federal contract officials reported the contracts as small business awards, and (3) what actions are being taken to address any identified problems."
Date: May 7, 2003
Creator: United States. General Accounting Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Small Business Participation in the Alaska Natural Gas Pipeline Project

Description: Correspondence issued by the Government Accountability Office with an abstract that begins "Alaska currently holds 35 trillion cubic feet of proven recoverable natural gas resources, about 19 percent of total U.S. reserves. Efforts to construct a pipeline to transport this natural gas from Alaska's North Slope to the lower 48 states have been stalled since 1982. The recent increase in natural gas prices has renewed interest in completing the pipeline, a project that is estimated to cost up to $20 billion. In addition to providing access to significant natural gas reserves, some expect the project to generate thousands of jobs and billions of dollars in revenues for the federal government and the State of Alaska. This report responds to a mandate in the Alaska Natural Gas Pipeline Act (the Pipeline Act) that we conduct a study to determine the extent to which small business concerns have participated in the construction of oil and gas pipelines. The Pipeline Act includes a "sense of Congress" provision that the sponsors of the Alaska natural gas pipeline should maximize the participation of small business concerns in contracts and subcontracts awarded for the project. This provision, while setting out a statement of congressional opinion, does not establish a legal requirement for small business participation. We confirmed that this report would focus on small business participation in the Alaska natural gas pipeline. It describes (1) the status of the Alaska natural gas pipeline project and (2) the extent to which any regulatory or oversight structure is in place to monitor small business participation in the construction of the pipeline."
Date: August 4, 2005
Creator: United States. Government Accountability Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Information on the Number of Small Business Set-Asides Issued and Successfully Challenged

Description: Correspondence issued by the General Accounting Office with an abstract that begins "The Small Business Act requires small businesses to have the maximum practicable opportunity to participate in the performance of federal government contracts. Congress directed the President to set a governmentwide goal of at least 23 percent of the total dollar value of the federal government's prime contract awards to be awarded to small businesses each fiscal year. The small Business Administration's (SBA) Procurement Center Representatives (PCRs) work with federal agencies and procuring activities by reviewing proposed acquisitions to determine whether they can be set aside for small businesses. GAO found that the number of PCR-recommended small businesses set-asides has declined by almost one-half since fiscal year 1991. Overall, contracting officers accepted 76 percent of the set-aside recommendations. Of the 24 percent rejected, SBA did not pursue 85 percent. Of the 15 percent appealed, 26 percent were successful. SBA officials attributed the decline to several factors, including (1) downsizing the number of PCRs; (2) assigning other duties to PCRs, such as requiring some PCRs to be Commercial Marketing Representatives, further reducing available PCR resources; and (3) fewer set-aside opportunities due to increasing size and individual federal procurements. SBA officials also explained that PCRs take different approaches to filing set-aside recommendations--some choose to influence contract actions informally, without filing set-aside recommendations. SBA does not keep track of information PCR actions."
Date: November 1, 2002
Creator: United States. General Accounting Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Factors for Evaluating the Cost Share of Manufacturing Extension Partnership Program to Assist Small and Medium-Sized Manufacturers

Description: Correspondence issued by the Government Accountability Office with an abstract that begins "U.S. manufacturing plays an important role in the nation's economy, producing about $1.6 trillion of value each year--11.5 percent of the U.S. gross domestic product (GDP)--and accounting for over 13 million jobs in the United States in 2008, according to the Department of Commerce. However, over the past decade, increased competition abroad and the migration of manufacturing overseas have led to declines in U.S. manufacturing. To support the manufacturing sector, the federal government has undertaken efforts, including creating programs that are partly funded by the federal government and partly funded by nonfederal entities such as state and local governments. However, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, from 2008 to 2009, following the beginning of the recent economic downturn, the United States lost 1.5 million manufacturing jobs. One federal effort aimed at helping manufacturers is the Hollings Manufacturing Extension Partnership (MEP) program. The MEP program was established in 1988 through Commerce's National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to enhance productivity and technological performance, and strengthen the global competitiveness of small and medium-sized U.S. manufacturers, helping them create and retain jobs. Under this program, NIST has established relationships with 60 nonfederal organizations throughout the United States and Puerto Rico--called MEP centers. NIST enters into annual cooperative agreements with each of the 60 MEP centers whereby federal funding is provided to the centers subject to the centers providing matching funds and meeting performance measures. These centers provide services to small and medium-sized manufacturers to help them develop new customers, expand into new markets, and create new products. MEP centers focus on helping manufacturers in five key areas--technology acceleration, supplier development, sustainability, workforce, and continuous improvement. Specifically, MEP centers enter into contracts with companies to deliver technical assistance to improve ...
Date: April 4, 2011
Creator: United States. Government Accountability Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Information on Defective Drywall

Description: Correspondence issued by the Government Accountability Office with an abstract that begins "GAO found that numerous claims for damage have been addressed through legal settlements partly paid by commercial insurance reimbursements. Three of the four insurers with whom GAO spoke contributed to legal settlements by paying for CGL claims stemming from lawsuits against their policyholders, and one of these insurers also made payments for CGL claims separate from legal settlements. The legal settlements from defective drywall lawsuits involve hundreds of companies in the drywall supply chain (including importers, suppliers, and builders), and most of the lawsuits have been consolidated under multidistrict litigation in the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Louisiana. One of the legal settlements involves one of the two primary manufacturers of defective drywall and provides an uncapped amount of funds to address damage to affected homes, as well as $30 million for other expenses. This manufacturer's settlement is part of a group of settlements that guarantees more than $350 million to assist affected home owners, with the potential to increase."
Date: July 31, 2013
Creator: United States. Government Accountability Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Feasibility of Requiring Financial Assurances for the Recall or Destruction of Unsafe Consumer Products

Description: Correspondence issued by the Government Accountability Office with an abstract that begins "In 2008, the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) announced that it had obtained the voluntary recall of 563 unsafe or potentially unsafe products by the companies that manufactured, imported, distributed, or sold the products--the largest number for the agency in the past 10 years. In the prior year, CPSC announced 472 recalls--which was also an increase from the previous year and included some high-profile recalls of lead-tainted toys--leading some consumer groups to call 2007 the "year of the recall." Consumer products can be recalled for a variety of reasons, including violations of safety standards, incidents of injuries that can occur from the design or manufacture of a product, or other conditions that present an imminent or substantial hazard to consumers. Since 1979 there have been few instances in which CPSC could not obtain cooperation from manufacturers or importers to conduct recalls, either because these companies did not have the financial resources to conduct a recall or because the companies refused to assume responsibility for a recall. This included troubled recalls involving more than 1.5 million imported cribs associated with multiple deaths of children. Another recall of imported tires, conducted under the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, was the responsibility of a small importer that did not have the resources to conduct an effective recall. These, and similar events, have raised concerns from consumer groups and others about the ability of businesses to conduct effective recalls and of the federal government to ensure consumer safety. In addition to these concerns, CPSC reports that more than two-thirds of recalled products in 2008 were imported. The proportion of consumer goods sold in the United States that are manufactured abroad has shifted significantly since CPSC was created in the 1970s. From 1997 ...
Date: April 22, 2009
Creator: United States. Government Accountability Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Waivers of the Small Business Administration's Nonmanufacturer Rule Have Limited Effect

Description: Correspondence issued by the General Accounting Office with an abstract that begins "Under section 8(a) of the Small Business Act, the Small Business Administration (SBA) conducts a program for developing small businesses that are owned by socially and economically disadvantaged individuals. Participants can receive contracts under acquisitions that federal agencies offer to the 8(a) program as well as business development assistance from SBA. A firm that receives a supply contract under the 8(a) program or a small business set aside can be either a manufacturer or a nonmanufacturer of a product. Under SBA's rules, however, a nonmanufacturer who receives one of these contracts must agree to supply the product of a domestic small manufacturer or processor. SBA can waive this requirement when there are no small manufacturers or processors available to supply the product. There are two types of waivers to the nonmanufacturer rule: (1) individual waivers, which apply only to a specific contract and are effective for the life of that contract, and (2) class waivers, which apply to categories of items and continue in effect unless revoked by SBA. Once a waiver of the nonmanufacturer rule is approved, a firm may supply the product of a large manufacturer. GAO reviewed (1) the number of individual waivers SBA approved in fiscal year 2001 and the dollar amount of fiscal year 2001 contract obligations that resulted from those waivers, and (2) the number of class waivers available for use during fiscal year 2001 and the dollar amount of fiscal year 2001 obligations that resulted from those waivers. SBA approved 23 individual waivers of the nonmanufacturer rule in fiscal year 2001. Sixteen of the waivers were used on ten 8(a) contracts with a total of $6.3 million in fiscal year 2001 obligations. The remaining seven waivers either did not result in ...
Date: December 19, 2002
Creator: United States. General Accounting Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

SBA: Investigation of an SBA Employee's Travel

Description: Correspondence issued by the General Accounting Office with an abstract that begins "From October 1998 through August 2000, the Small Business Administration's (SBA) Deputy Associate Administrator for Communications made 50 trips at a total cost to the government of $58,840. At least 39 of these trips were made in conjunction with trips by the SBA Administrator. Of the remaining 11 trips, the travel vouchers and authorizations for eight contained no reference to the Administrator and the other three were to attend training sessions."
Date: December 21, 2000
Creator: United States. General Accounting Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Risk Retention Groups: Common Regulatory Standards and Greater Member Protections Are Needed

Description: A letter report issued by the Government Accountability Office with an abstract that begins "Congress authorized the creation of risk retention groups (RRG) to increase the availability and affordability of commercial liability insurance. An RRG is a group of similar businesses that creates its own insurance company to self-insure its risks. Through the Liability Risk Retention Act (LRRA), Congress partly preempted state insurance law to create a single-state regulatory framework for RRGs, although RRGs are multistate insurers. Recent shortages of affordable liability insurance have increased RRG formations, but recent failures of several large RRGs also raised questions about the adequacy of RRG regulation. This report (1) examines the effect of RRGs on insurance availability and affordability; (2) assesses whether LRRA's preemption has resulted in significant regulatory problems; and (3) evaluates the sufficiency of LRRA's ownership, control, and governance provisions in protecting the best interests of the RRG insureds."
Date: August 15, 2005
Creator: United States. Government Accountability Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Government Contracting: Federal Efforts to Assist Small Minority Owned Businesses

Description: A letter report issued by the Government Accountability Office with an abstract that begins "While their views varied to some degree, federal agency officials and advocacy groups GAO contacted identified a number of challenges that small, minority-owned businesses may face in pursuing federal government contracts. For example, officials and advocacy groups pointed to a lack of performance history and knowledge of the federal contracting process as significant barriers. Officials from advocacy groups cited additional challenges, such as difficulty gaining access to contracting officials and decreased contracting opportunities resulting from contract bundling—the consolidation of two or more contracts previously performed under smaller contracts, into a single contract. Officials from agencies that accounted for 70 percent of federal contracting with small, minority-owned businesses—(the Departments of Defense, Health and Human Services, and Homeland Security, and the General Services Administration) told GAO that they conducted outreach to help small, minority-owned businesses with these challenges. Their outreach efforts include one-on-one interviews between contracting office staff and businesses seeking federal contracts. Linguistic and cultural barriers were identified as a challenge on a limited basis."
Date: September 28, 2012
Creator: United States. Government Accountability Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Consumer Credit: Limited Information Exists on Extent of Credit Report Errors and Their Implications for Consumers

Description: A statement of record issued by the General Accounting Office with an abstract that begins "Accurate credit reports are critical to the credit process--for consumers attempting to obtain credit and to lending institutions making decisions about extending credit. In today's sophisticated and highly calibrated credit markets, credit report errors can have significant monetary implications to consumers and credit granters. In recognition of the importance of this issue, the Senate Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs asked GAO to (1) provide information on the frequency, type, and cause of credit report errors, and (2) describe the impact of the 1996 amendments to the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) on credit report accuracy and potential implications of reporting errors for consumers."
Date: July 31, 2003
Creator: United States. General Accounting Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Financial Audit: The Small Business Administration's Fiscal Year 2004 Management Representation Letter on Its Financial Statements

Description: Correspondence issued by the Government Accountability Office with an abstract that begins "The Secretary of the Treasury, in coordination with the Director of the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), is required to annually prepare and submit audited financial statements of the U.S. government to the President and the Congress. We are required to audit these consolidated financial statements (CFS) and report on the results of our work. In connection with fulfilling our requirement to audit the fiscal year 2004 CFS, we evaluated the Department of the Treasury's (Treasury) financial reporting procedures and related internal control over the process for compiling the CFS, including the management representation letter provided us by Treasury and OMB. Written representation letters from management, required by U.S. generally accepted government auditing standards, ordinarily confirm oral representations given to the auditor, indicate and document the continuing appropriateness of those representations, and reduce the possibility of a misunderstanding between management and the auditor. The purpose of this report is to communicate our observations on the Small Business Administration's (SBA) fiscal year 2004 management representation letter. Our objective is to help ensure that future management representation letters submitted by SBA are sufficient to help support Treasury and OMB's preparation of the CFS management representation letter and our ability to rely on the representations in that letter in combination with individual federal agency representation letters. We reviewed five key areas in each management representation letter: (1) signatures, (2) materiality thresholds, (3) representations, (4) summary of unadjusted misstatements, and (5) reliability of representations. In reviewing the management representation letters, we applied the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants' (AICPA) Codification of Auditing Standards, AU Section 333, Management Representations; OMB Bulletin 01-02, Audit Requirements for Federal Financial Statements; and the GAO/President's Council on Integrity and Efficiency (PCIE) Financial Audit Manual (FAM) ...
Date: June 23, 2005
Creator: United States. Government Accountability Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Insurance Reciprocity and Uniformity: NAIC and State Regulators Have Made Progress in Producer Licensing, Product Approval, and Market Conduct Regulation, but Challenges Remain

Description: A letter report issued by the Government Accountability Office with an abstract that begins "Because the insurance market is a vital part of the U.S. economy, Congress and others are concerned about limitations to reciprocity and uniformity, regulatory inefficiency, higher insurance costs, and uneven consumer protection. GAO was asked to review the areas of (1) producer licensing, (2) product approval, and (3) market conduct regulation in terms of progress by NAIC and state regulators to increase reciprocity and uniformity, the factors affecting this progress, and the potential impacts if greater progress is not made. GAO analyzed federal laws and regulatory documents, assessed NAIC efforts, and interviewed industry officials."
Date: April 6, 2009
Creator: United States. Government Accountability Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Federal Advertising: Established Programs Were Largely Used to Address Executive Order Directive to Ensure Small and Minority-Owned Business Participation

Description: A letter report issued by the Government Accountability Office with an abstract that begins "In 2005, federal spending on advertising exceeded $1 billion. Five agencies--DOD, Treasury, HHS, Interior, and NASA--together made up over 90 percent of this spending from 2001 to 2005. Executive Order 13170, signed in October 2000, directs agencies to take an aggressive role in ensuring substantial participation in federal advertising contracts by businesses in the Small Business Administration's (SBA) 8(a) and small disadvantaged business (SDB) programs and minority-owned businesses. This report describes (1) strategies DOD, HHS, Treasury, Interior, and NASA used to address Executive Order 13170, and (2) the total obligations, number of contract actions, and percentage of total obligations represented by these actions that each agency awarded to 8(a)s, SDBs, and minority-owned businesses for advertising services. In conducting this study, GAO analyzed agency contracting data and executive order implementation plans and interviewed agency procurement officials."
Date: July 12, 2007
Creator: United States. Government Accountability Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Veterans' Health Care: Oversight of Tissue Product Safety

Description: Testimony issued by the Government Accountability Office with an abstract that begins "Data from the Veteran's Health Administration (VHA), within the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), do not show evidence of VHA receiving contaminated tissue products, although, it is difficult to link adverse events in recipients to such products. VA's National Center for Patient Safety (NCPS), which began operation in 1999, has not issued any patient safety alerts—mandates for action to address actual or potential threats to life or health—or advisories—guidance to address issues such as equipment design and product failure—related to tissue products potentially received by VA medical centers (VAMC) in the last 10 years. NCPS issues patient safety alerts and advisories for recalls that require specific clinical actions to ensure patient safety. Since NCPS began issuing and recording data on recalls in November 2008, NCPS has notified VAMCs of 13 recalls for tissue products from vendors from which VHA could have received affected products—none of these recalls have resulted in patient safety alerts or advisories. For 6 of the recalls, 27 VAMCs reported to NCPS that they had identified and removed the recalled products from their inventories. For the other 7 recalls, none of the VAMCs had the affected tissue products in their inventories. The 13 recalls were not issued for known tissue product contamination. Instead, most were initiated because of the possibility of contamination, such as compromise of product sterility and incomplete donor records. Further, VHA officials told us that their analysis of VHA data found no evidence of reported adverse events among VHA patients that were caused by contaminated tissue products. According to officials from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), post-surgical infections often occur, even in the absence of tissue use, and it is often not possible to definitively attribute such infections to a tissue ...
Date: April 2, 2014
Creator: United States. Government Accountability Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Department of Energy: Improved Oversight Could Better Ensure Opportunities for Small Business Subcontracting

Description: A letter report issued by the Government Accountability Office with an abstract that begins "Federal policy requires that small businesses receive the maximum practicable subcontracting opportunity for providing goods and services to large businesses that contract directly with federal agencies. The Department of Energy (DOE) annually directs almost $20 billion to the 34 "facility management contractors" of which $3.3 billion was redirected to small business subcontractors in fiscal year 2004. DOE negotiates annual small business subcontracting goals with individual contractors and monitors their achievements. GAO was asked to (1) determine the usefulness of the data that DOE uses to monitor subcontracting performance and (2) discuss the actions that DOE has taken to address any problems with the contractors' subcontracting efforts."
Date: May 13, 2005
Creator: United States. Government Accountability Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Small Business: Information on Selected Treasury 8(a) Contracts

Description: Correspondence issued by the General Accounting Office with an abstract that begins "Pursuant to a congressional request, GAO provided information on 8(a) contracting activities for fiscal years (FY) 1996 through 1998 in certain offices within the Department of the Treasury, focusing on: (1) a comparison of Departmental Offices' 8(a) contract goals with Treasury's departmentwide 8(a) contract goals; (2) the total number of Departmental Offices' contracts and 8(a) contracts as well as the percentage of total Departmental Offices' contract expenditures used for 8(a) contracts; (3) the distribution of Departmental Offices' 8(a) contracts by dollar value and type of goods/services procured; and (4) whether five Departmental Offices' 8(a) contracts adhered to regulations that limit the amount of work that can be subcontracted."
Date: May 13, 1999
Creator: United States. General Accounting Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Small Business Administration: SBA Followed Appropriate Policies and Procedures for September 11 Disaster Loan Applications

Description: A letter report issued by the Government Accountability Office with an abstract that begins "The Small Business Administration (SBA) played a key role in assisting small businesses affected by the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks by providing over $1 billion in disaster loans to businesses that sustained physical damage or economic injury. Small businesses in the immediate areas of the attacks and others nationwide that suffered related economic injury were eligible to apply for disaster loans. SBA declined or withdrew about half of these loan applications. SBA's disaster loans are direct federal government loans provided at a subsidized interest rate. In response to concerns that more small businesses impacted by September 11 could have benefited from SBA's disaster loans, GAO conducted a review of its Disaster Loan Program. Specifically, GAO addressed the following questions: (1) Are the disaster program policies consistent with the law and the overall mission of SBA's Disaster Loan Program? (2) What were SBA's underwriting policies and criteria for September 11 Economic Injury Disaster Loans (EIDL) and how did they compare with those applied by nonprofit lenders that were active in New York City after September 11? (3) Did SBA correctly apply its policies and procedures in its disposition of September 11 EIDLs?"
Date: August 31, 2004
Creator: United States. Government Accountability Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department