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Arsenic exposure, AS3MT polymorphism, and neuropsychological functioning among rural dwelling adults and elders: a cross-sectional study

Description: This article aims to examine the link between low-level arsenic exposure and cognitive functioning, and the potential role of a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP A35991G, rs10748835) of the AS3MT gene in modifying this link.
Date: March 12, 2014
Creator: Edwards, Melissa; Hall, James R.; Gong, Gordon & O'Bryant, Sid E.
Partner: UNT College of Arts and Sciences

FY08 Annual Report: Amorphous Semiconductors for Gamma Radiation Detection (ASGRAD)

Description: This is the annual report for an old project funded by NA22. The purpose of the project was to develop amorphous semiconductors for use as radiation detectors. The annual report contains information about the progress made in synthesizing, characterizing, and radiation response testing of these new materials.
Date: February 1, 2009
Creator: Johnson, Bradley R.; Riley, Brian J.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Ryan, Joseph V.; Sundaram, S. K.; McCloy, John S. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Galvanomagnetic Determination of Energy Bands in Arsenic

Description: A study of the transport properties of a substance requires the determination of a set of transport coefficients by experiment. From these coefficients, the elements of the electrical conductivity tensor, thermoelectric tensor, et cetera can be determined. In this experiment, measurements and analyses of galvanomagnetic effects in a single crystal of arsenic were performed. The measurements were made at liquid-helium temperatures in magnetic fields ranging to 25 kilogauss. The gross isothermal, electrical conductivities have been analyzed to determine various parameters characterizing the energy bands in arsenic.
Date: January 1968
Creator: Hathcox, Kyle Lee
Partner: UNT Libraries

Evaluation of innovative arsenic treatment technologies :the arsenic water technology partnership vendors forums summary report.

Description: The lowering of the drinking water standard (MCL) for arsenic from 50 {micro}g/L to 10 {micro}g/L in January 2006 could lead to significant increases in the cost of water for many rural systems throughout the United States. The Arsenic Water Technology Partnership (AWTP), a collaborative effort of Sandia National Laboratories, the Awwa Research Foundation (AwwaRF) and WERC: A Consortium for Environmental Education and Technology Development, was formed to address this problem by developing and testing novel treatment technologies that could potentially reduce the costs of arsenic treatment. As a member of the AWTP, Sandia National Laboratories evaluated cutting-edge commercial products in three annual Arsenic Treatment Technology Vendors Forums held during the annual New Mexico Environmental Health Conferences (NMEHC) in 2003, 2004 and 2005. The Forums were comprised of two parts. At the first session, open to all conference attendees, commercial developers of innovative treatment technologies gave 15-minute talks that described project histories demonstrating the effectiveness of their products. During the second part, these same technologies were evaluated and ranked in closed sessions by independent technical experts for possible use in pilot-scale field demonstrations being conducted by Sandia National Laboratories. The results of the evaluations including numerical rankings of the products, links to company websites and copies of presentations made by the representatives of the companies are posted on the project website at http://www.sandia.gov/water/arsenic.htm. This report summarizes the contents of the website by providing brief descriptions of the technologies represented at the Forums and the results of the evaluations.
Date: September 1, 2006
Creator: Everett, Randy L.; Siegel, Malcolm Dean; McConnell, Paul E. & Kirby, Carolyn (Comforce Technical Services, Inc.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Summary of resources available to small water systems for meeting the 10 ppb arsenic drinking water limit.

Description: With the lowering of the EPA maximum contaminant level of arsenic from 50 parts per billion (ppb) to 10 ppb, many public water systems in the country and in New Mexico in particular, are faced with making decisions about how to bring their system into compliance. This document provides detail on the options available to the water systems and the steps they need to take to achieve compliance with this regulation. Additionally, this document provides extensive resources and reference information for additional outreach support, financing options, vendors for treatment systems, and media pilot project results.
Date: January 1, 2007
Creator: Krumhansl, James Lee; Thomson, Bruce M. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Ziegler, Matt (New Mexico Tech, Albuquerque, NM); Butler, Susan (New Mexico Tech, Albuquerque, NM); Himmelberger, Heather (New Mexico Tech, Albuquerque, NM) & Holt, Kathleen Caroline
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Genetic and Molecular Dissection of Arsenic Hyperaccumulation in the fern Pteris vittata.

Description: Pteris vittata is a fern that is extraordinary in its ability to tolerate hyperaccumulate high levels of arsenic (As). The goals of the proposed research, to identify the genes that are necessary for As hyperaccumulation in P. vittata using molecular and genetic approaches and to understand the physiology of arsenic uptake and distribution in the living plant, were accomplished during the funding period. The genes that have been identified may ultimately enable the engineering or selection of other plants capable of As hyperaccumulation. This is important for the phytoremediation of arsenic-contaminated soils in areas where P. vittata cannot grow.
Date: April 4, 2008
Creator: Banks, Jo Ann & Salt, David
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

[Marysvale Region Study], Annual Report: June 30, 1953-April 1, 1954, Part 1

Description: First part of an annual report describing studies conducted by researchers at Columbia University to surveyuranium mineralization in the Marysvale, Utah region: "Part I deals with field studies and mineralogical data derived from the laboratory examination of suites collected during the previous summer" (p. 5).
Date: April 1954
Creator: Kerr, Paul F.; Lapham, Davis M.; Bodine, Marc W., Jr.; Hamilton, P. K. & Bethke, Philip Martin
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Performance evaluation of ALCAN-AASF50-ferric coated activated alumina and granular ferric hydroxide (GFH) for arsenic removal in the presence of competitive ions in an active well :Kirtland field trial - initial studies.

Description: This report documents a field trial program carried out at Well No.15 located at Kirtland Air Force Base, Albuquerque, New Mexico, to evaluate the performance of two relatively new arsenic removal media, ALCAN-AASF50 (ferric coated activated alumina) and granular ferric hydroxide (US Filter-GFH). The field trial program showed that both media were able to remove arsenate and meet the new total arsenic maximum contaminant level (MCL) in drinking water of 10 {micro}g/L. The arsenate removal capacity was defined at a breakthrough effluent concentration of 5 {micro}g/L arsenic (50% of the arsenic MCL of 10 {micro}g/L). At an influent pH of 8.1 {+-} 0.4, the arsenate removal capacity of AASF50 was 33.5 mg As(V)/L of dry media (29.9 {micro}g As(V)/g of media on a dry basis). At an influent pH of 7.2 {+-} 0.3, the arsenate removal capacity of GFH was 155 mg As(V)/L of wet media (286 {micro}g As(V)/g of media on a dry basis). Silicate, fluoride, and bicarbonate ions are removed by ALCAN AASF50. Chloride, nitrate, and sulfate ions were not removed by AASF50. The GFH media also removed silicate and bicarbonate ions; however, it did not remove fluoride, chloride, nitrate, and sulfate ions. Differences in the media performance partly reflect the variations in the feed-water pH between the 2 tests. Both the exhausted AASF50 and GFH media passed the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) test with respect to arsenic and therefore could be disposed as nonhazardous waste.
Date: January 1, 2006
Creator: Neidel, Linnah L.; Krumhansl, James Lee; Siegel, Malcolm Dean & Khandaker, Nadim Reza
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Vapor Pressure of Arsenic Trioxide

Description: Technical paper issued by the Bureau of Mines over investigations of vapor pressure. The methods and equipment used for the investigations are presented. The results are discussed. This paper includes tables, illustrations, and photographs.
Date: March 1915
Creator: Welch, H. V. & Duschak, L. H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Some Compounds of Plutonium With Metalloid Elements

Description: From abstract: "Experimental methods of the type employed for alloy preparation in metallurgical research have been used in attempts to prepare compounds of plutonium with four different metalloid elements: phosphorous, arsenic, selenium, and tellurium. By means of their X-ray diffraction patterns the existences of six previously unknown compounds have been established, but the composition and crystal structures of only three of the compounds have been determined."
Date: 1955
Creator: Gorum, Alvin Eugene
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Arsenic Water Technology Partnership Final Technical Report

Description: Congress created the Arsenic Water Technology Partnership (AWTP) in 2002 to develop and provide solutions for the cost-effective removal of arsenic from drinking water. The AWTP was funded by four congressional appropriations (FY03-FY06) to evaluate and develop new technologies that could significantly reduce compliance costs associated with the new 0.010 mg/L maximum contaminant level (MCL) for arsenic in drinking water. Initially focused on arsenic research, in FY06 the AWTP was expanded to include desalination research upon recognition that the research challenges were similar. The funding for the research and subsequent transfer of technology was made available by Congress through the Department of Energy (DOE). The AWTP was a collaborative effort between DOE’s Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia), Water Research Foundation (WaterRF, formerly Awwa Research Foundation) and WERC: A Consortium for Environmental Education and Technology Development based at New Mexico State University (WERC). Key features of the AWTP included technology development, technology implementation/testing and technology transfer. Each of the partners evaluated and oversaw development of new arsenic and desalination treatment technologies, and the technology transfer program ensured that successful technologies were transferred to the water supply community. Through the use of an arsenic treatment cost model, training sessions and a web site, information on arsenic removal and desalination technologies was transferred to stakeholders. KEY ACCOMPLISHMENTS The AWTP partnership funded research on, and deployment and testing of, innovative arsenic and desalination removal technologies; education for small and large water system operators; and development of a comprehensive web-based tool for arsenic treatment technology selection using site-specific data. As water becomes scarcer, and potable water supplies become increasingly vulnerable to contamination, the development of affordable water treatment systems is critical. Choosing the best available treatment system can be difficult. The AWTP has developed and evaluated improved arsenic and desalination treatment systems and provided that information ...
Date: December 31, 2010
Creator: Ilges, A., Thompson, R., Campbell, C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Arsenic pilot plant operation and results : Anthony, New Mexico.

Description: Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is conducting pilot scale evaluations of the performance and cost of innovative water treatment technologies aimed at meeting the recently revised arsenic maximum contaminant level (MCL) for drinking water. The standard of 10 {micro}g/L (10 ppb) is effective as of January 2006. The pilot tests have been conducted in New Mexico where over 90 sites that exceed the new MCL have been identified by the New Mexico Environment Department. The pilot test described in this report was conducted in Anthony, New Mexico between August 2005 and December 2006 at Desert Sands Mutual Domestic Water Consumers Association (MDWCA) (Desert Sands) Well No.3. The pilot demonstrations are a part of the Arsenic Water Technology Partnership program, a partnership between the American Water Works Association Research Foundation (AwwaRF), SNL and WERC (A Consortium for Environmental Education and Technology Development). The Sandia National Laboratories pilot demonstration at the Desert Sands site obtained arsenic removal performance data for fourteen different adsorptive media under intermittent flow conditions. Well water at Desert Sands has approximately 20 ppb arsenic in the unoxidized (arsenite-As(III)) redox state with moderately high total dissolved solids (TDS), mainly due to high sulfate, chloride, and varying concentrations of iron. The water is slightly alkaline with a pH near 8. The study provides estimates of the capacity (bed volumes until breakthrough at 10 ppb arsenic) of adsorptive media in the same chlorinated water. Adsorptive media were compared side-by-side in ambient pH water with intermittent flow operation. This pilot is broken down into four phases, which occurred sequentially, however the phases overlapped in most cases.
Date: September 1, 2007
Creator: Aragon, Malynda Jo; Everett, Randy L.; Siegel, Malcolm Dean; Aragon, Alicia R.; Kottenstette, Richard Joseph; Holub, William E., Jr. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Arsenic speciation using high performance liquid chromatography-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry

Description: A method has been developed by Argonne National Laboratory to identify and quantify As(III), As(V), and organoarsenic compounds in environmental samples. A arsenic species were separated by reversed-phase, ion-pairing, HPLC using a microbore Inertsil-ODS{trademark} column. Only 1 {micro}L of sample was injected on the column, and the mobile phase flow rates were typically on the order of 40 {micro}L/min. The HPLC mobile phase was a mixture of methanol and tetrabutylammonium hydroxide (TBAH), and the column effluent was introduced into an ICP-mass spectrometer using direct injection nebulization. Detection limits of less than 1 pg As (as injected on the column) were easily obtained for each arsenic species. The effect of changes in mobile phase composition and ICP-MS conditions will be described, as well as quality control measures, e.g., the use of surrogates, internal standards, and matrix spikes. Precision and accuracy information will be presented from the analysis of aqueous standards and soil extracts that were spiked with arsenic oxide [As(III)], sodium arsenate [As(V)], dimethylarsinic acid (DMAA), or chlorovinyl arsenious acid (CVAA). The authors believe that these data demonstrate the utility of this technique for the sensitive determination of arsenic species present in water or soil.
Date: August 1995
Creator: Bass, D. A.; Yaeger, J. S.; Crain, J. S.; Kiely, J. T.; Parish, K. J.; Gowdy, M. J. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Pilot test specific test plan for the removal of arsenic Socorro, New Mexico.

Description: Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is conducting pilot scale evaluations of the performance and cost of innovative drinking water treatment technologies designed to meet the new arsenic maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 10 {micro}g/L (effective January 2006). As currently envisioned, pilots tests may include multiple phases. Phase I tests will involve side-by-side comparisons of several commercial technologies primarily using design parameters suggested by the Vendors. Subsequent tests (Phase II) may involve repeating some of the original tests, testing the same commercial technologies under different conditions and testing experimental technologies or additional commercial technologies. This Pilot Test Specific Test Plan (PTSTP) was written for Phase I of the Socorro Springs Pilot. The objectives of Phase I include evaluation of the treatment performance of five adsorptive media under ambient pH conditions (approximately 8.0) and assessment of the effect of contact time on the performance of one of the media. Addenda to the PTSTP may be written to cover Phase II studies and supporting laboratory studies. The Phase I demonstration began in the winter of 2004 and will last approximately 9 months. The information from the test will help the City of Socorro choose the best arsenic treatment technology for the Socorro Springs well. The pilot demonstration is a project of the Arsenic Water Technology Partnership program, a partnership between the American Water Works Association (AWWA) Research Foundation, SNL, and WERC (A Consortium for Environmental Education and Technology Development).
Date: March 1, 2006
Creator: Collins, Sue S.; Aragon, Malynda Jo; Everett, Randy L.; Siegel, Malcolm Dean; Aragon, Alicia R.; Dwyer, Brian P. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Nuclear Reactions of Arsenic with 190 Mev Deuterons

Description: Isotopes formed in the bombardment of {sub 33}As{sup 75} with 190 Mev deuterons range in atomic number up to 24 (or more) mass units lighter than As{sup 75}. Identification of these isotopes was based on chemical behavior and half-life determination. Relative yields have been calculated and show that 80% of the observed reactions produce isotopes within 8 mass units of As{sup 75}. Three new isotopes have been observed: 9.5 d. Se{sup 72} (K), 44 m, Se{sup 71} ({beta}{sup +}), and 52 m, As{sup 71} ({beta}{sup +}).
Date: January 21, 1948
Creator: Hopkins Jr, H.H. & Cunningham, B.B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Arsenic in Drinking Water: Recent Regulatory Developments and Issues

Description: This report discusses issues regarding the arsenic’s health effects and how to reduce the uncertainty in assessing health risks associated with exposure to low levels of arsenic. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued the current standard of 50 parts per billion (ppb) in 1975. . This report reviews EPA efforts to develop a new arsenic rule and summarizes key provisions and subsequent events.
Date: November 16, 2001
Creator: Tiemann, Mary
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Arsenic in Drinking Water: Recent Regulatory Developments and Issues

Description: This report discusses issues regarding the arsenic’s health effects and how to reduce the uncertainty in assessing health risks associated with exposure to low levels of arsenic. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued the current standard of 50 parts per billion (ppb) in 1975. . This report reviews EPA efforts to develop a new arsenic rule and summarizes key provisions and subsequent events.
Date: April 29, 2002
Creator: Tiemann, Mary
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Arsenic in Drinking Water: Regulatory Develpoments and Issues

Description: This report discusses issues regarding the arsenic’s health effects and how to reduce the uncertainty in assessing health risks associated with exposure to low levels of arsenic. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued the current standard of 50 parts per billion (ppb) in 1975. . This report reviews EPA efforts to develop a new arsenic rule and summarizes key provisions and subsequent events.
Date: February 7, 2005
Creator: Tiemann, Mary
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Arsenic in Drinking Water: Regulatory Develpoments and Issues

Description: This report discusses issues regarding the arsenic’s health effects and how to reduce the uncertainty in assessing health risks associated with exposure to low levels of arsenic. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued the current standard of 50 parts per billion (ppb) in 1975. . This report reviews EPA efforts to develop a new arsenic rule and summarizes key provisions and subsequent events.
Date: October 20, 2005
Creator: Tiemann, Mary
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department