69 Matching Results

Search Results

Advanced search parameters have been applied.

Flight Determination of the Static Longitudinal Stability Boundaries of the Bell X-5 Research Airplane with 59 Deg Sweepback

Description: During the flight program on the Bell X-5 airplane with 59 deg sweepback to determine the practical Mach number and normal-force coefficient limits of this configuration, a reduction in static longitudinal stability was encountered in maneuvering flight. A determination of the boundary for reduction of longitudinal stability extending to a Mach number of 0.98 is presented in this paper. A reduction of static longitudinal stability existed for all elevator and all stabilizer-executed maneuvers. The reduction of stability existed for maneuvers executed with elevator near a normal-force coefficient of 0.6 for a Mach number range of about 0.31 to 0.76. Above a Mach number of 0.76 the normal-force coefficient for reduction of stability gradually decreased to a value of 0.2 at a Mach number of 0.98. For stabilizer-executed maneuvers the stability boundary was the same as for elevator maneuvers up to a Mach number of 0.88. Above this Mach number the reduction of stability occurred at slightly higher normal-force coefficients decreasing from about 0.51 at a Mach number of 0.92 to a value of 0.311 at a Mach number of 0.97. The airplane has been flown to a Mach number of 1.04 at a normal-force coefficient of about 0.15 without encountering any reduction of stability. The pilot did not consider the reduction of stability to be dangerous at altitudes above 30,000 feet; however, precise flight was impossible. At angles of attack above that at which the reduction of longitudinal stability occurred, directional instability and aileron control overbalance were encountered.
Date: February 20, 1953
Creator: Finch, Thomas W & Walker, Joseph A
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Flight Measurements of the Stability Characteristics of the Bell X-5 Research Airplane in Sideslips at 59 Deg Sweepback

Description: Flight measurements of the stability characteristics of the Bell X-5 research airplane at 59 deg sweepback were made in steady sideslips at Mach numbers from 0.62 to 0.97 at altitudes ranging between 35,000 and 40,000 feet. The results showed that the apparent directional stability was positive and increased at Mach numbers above 0.90. The apparent effective dihedral was positive and high, increasing at Mach numbers above 0.75. The cross-wind force coefficient per degree of sideslip was positive and increased rapidly at Mach numbers above 0.94.
Date: February 11, 1953
Creator: Childs, Joan M
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

NACA Conference on Aircraft Loads, Structures, and Flutter

Description: This document contains reproductions of technical papers on some of the most recent research results on aircraft loads, flutter, and structures from the NACA laboratories. These papers were presented by members of the staff of the NACA laboratories at the Conference held at the Langley Aeronautical Laboratory March 5, 6, and 7, 1957. The primary purpose of this Conference was to convey to contractors of the military services and others concerned with the design of aircraft these recent research results and to provide those attending an opportunity to discuss the results. The papers in this document are in the same form in which they were presented at the Conference in order to facilitate their prompt distribution. The original presentation and this record are considered as complementary to, rather than as substitutes for, the Committee?s more complete and formal reports. Accordingly, if information from this document is utilized it is requested that this document not be listed as a reference. Individual reports dealing with most of the information presented at the Conference will subsequently be published by NACA and will therefore be suitable as reference material.
Date: March 5, 1957
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

An Experimental Investigation of the Effect of Propellers Used as Aerodynamic Brakes on Stability and Control

Description: Tests were made of a model representative of a single-engine tractor-type airplane for the purpose of determining the stability and control effects of a propeller used as an aerodynamic brake. The tests were made with single-and dual-rotation propellers to show the effect of type of propeller rotation, and with positive thrust to provide basic data with which to compare the effects of negative thrust. Four configurations of the model were used to give the effects of tilting the propeller thrust axis down 5 deg., raising the horizontal tail, and combining both tilt and raised tail. Results of the tests are reported herein. The effects of negative thrust were found to be significant. The longitudinal stability was increased because of the loss of wing lift and increase of the angle of attack of the tail. Directional stability and both longitudinal and directional control were decreased because of the reduced velocity at the tail. These effects are moderate for moderate braking but become pronounced with full-power braking, particularly at high values of lift coefficient. The effects of model configuration changes were small when compared with the over-all effects of negative-thrust operation; however, improved stability and control characteristics were exhibited by the model with the tilted thrust axis. Raising the horizontal tail improved the longitudinal characteristics, but was detrimental to directional characteristics. The use of dual-rotation propeller reduced the directional trim charges resulting from the braking operation. A prototype airplane was assumed and handling qualities were computed and analyzed for normal (positive thrust) and braking operation with full and partial power. The results of these analyses are presented for the longitudinal characteristics in steady and accelerated flight, and for the directional characteristics in high- and low-speed flight. It was found that by limiting the power output of the engine (assuming the constant-speed propeller ...
Date: July 1, 1945
Creator: Hanson, Frederick H
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Static-Pressure Error of a Wing Airspeed Installation of the McDonnell XF-88 Airplane in Dives to Transonic Speeds

Description: Measurements were made, in dives to transonic speeds, of the static-pressure position error at a distance of one chord ahead of the McDonnell XF-88 airplane. The airplane incorporates a wing which is swept back 35 deg along the 0.22 chord line and utilizes a 65-series airfoil with a 9-percent-thick section perpendicular to the 0.25-chord line. The section in the stream direction is approximately 8-percent thick. Data up to a Mach number of about 0.97 were obtained within an airplane normal-force-coefficient range from about 0.05 to about 0.68. Data at Mach numbers above about 0.97 were obtained within an airplane normal-force-coefficient range from about 0.05 to about 0.68. Results of the measurements indicate that the static-pressure error, within the accuracy of measurement, is negligible from a Mach number of 0.65 to a Mach number of about 0.97. With a further increase in Mach number, the static-pressure error increases rapidly; at the highest Mach number attained in these tests (about M = 1.038), the error increases to about 8 percent of the impact pressure. Above a Mach number of about 0.975, the recorded Mach number remains substantially constant with increasing true Mach number; the installation is of no value between a Mach number of about 0.975 and at least 1.038, as the true Mach number cannot be obtained from the recorded Mach number in this range. Previously published data have shown that at 0.96 chord ahead of the wing tip of the straight-wing X-l airplanes, a rapid rise of position error started at a Mach number of about 0.8. In the case of the XF-88 airplane, this rise of position error was delayed, presumably by the sweep of the wing, to a Mach number of about 0.97.
Date: September 23, 1949
Creator: Goodman, Harold R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Vertical Descent and Landing Tests of a 0.13-Scale Model of the Convair XFY-1 Vertically Rising Airplane in Still Air, TED No. NACA DE 368

Description: An investigation is being conducted to determine the dynamic stability and control characteristics of a 0.13-scale flying model of Convair XFY-1 vertically rising airplane. This paper presents the results of flight and force tests to determine the stability and control characteristics of the model in vertical descent and landings in still air. The tests indicated that landings, including vertical descent from altitudes representing up to 400 feet for the full-scale airplane and at rates of descent up to 15 or 20 feet per second (full scale), can be performed satisfactorily. Sustained vertical descent in still air probably will be more difficult to perform because of large random trim changes that become greater as the descent velocity is increased. A slight steady head wind or cross wind might be sufficient to eliminate the random trim changes.
Date: March 4, 1954
Creator: Smith, Charlee C., Jr. & Lovell, Powell M., Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Supplementary Investigation in the Langley Free-Spinning Tunnel of a 1/20-Scale Model of the Douglas XF4D-1 Airplane Including Spin-Recovery Parachute Tests of the Model Loaded to Simulate the Douglas F5D-1 Airplane

Description: A supplementary investigation has been conducted in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel of a l/20-scale model of the Douglas XF4D-1 airplane to determine the effect of only neutralizing the rudder for recovery from an inverted spin, and the effect of partial aileron deflection with the spin for recovery from an erect spin. An estimation of the size parachute required for satisfactory recovery from a spin with the model ballasted to represent the Douglas F5D-1 (formerly the Douglas XF4D-2) airplane was also made. Results of the original investigation on the XF4D-1 design are presented in NACA RM SL50K30a. The results indicated that satisfactory recoveries from inverted spins of the airplane should be obtained by rudder neutralization when the longitudinal stick position is neutral or forward. Recoveries from erect spins from the normal-spin control configuration should be satisfactory by full rudder reversal with simultaneous movement of the ailerons to two-thirds with the spin. For the parachute tests with the model loaded to represent the F5D-1 airplane, the tests indicated that a 16.7-foot-diameter hemispherical-tail parachute (drag coefficient of 1.082 based on the projected area) with a towline 20.0 feet long (full- scale values) should be satisfactory for an emergency spin-recovery device during demonstration spins of the airplane.
Date: November 21, 1955
Creator: Klinar, Walter J. & Lee, Henry A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Transonic Stability and Control Investigation of a 1/80-Scale Model of the Consolidated Vultee Skate 9 Seaplane, TED No. NACA DE 345: Transonic-Bump Method

Description: An investigation of the longitudinal stability and of the all-movable horizontal tail and aileron control of a 1/80-scale reflection-plane model of the Consolidated Vultee Skate 9 seaplane has been made through a Mach number range of 0.6 to 1.16 on the transonic bump of the Langley high-speed 7- by 10-foot tunnel. At moderate lift coefficients (0.4 to 0.8) and below a Mach number of 1.0 the model was statically unstable longitudinally. The static longitudinal stability of the model at low lift coefficients increased with Mach number corresponding to a shift in aerodynamic center from 37 percent mean aerodynamic chord at a Mach number of 0.60 to 64 percent at a Mach number of 1.10. Estimates indicate that the tail deflection angle required for steady flight and for accelerated maneuvers of the Skate 9 airplane would probably not vary greatly with Mach number at sea level, but for accelerated maneuvers at altitude the tail deflection angle would probably vary erratically with Mach number. The variation of rolling-moment coefficient with aileron deflection angle was approximately linear, agreed well with theory, and held for the range of aileron deflections tested (-17.1 deg to 16.6 deg). At low lift coefficients the drag rise occurred at Mach numbers of 0.95 and 0.90 for the wing alone and the complete model, respectively. The effects of the canopy on the model were small. For the ranges investigated, angle-of-attack and Mach number changes caused no large pressure drops in the jet-engine duct.
Date: January 1, 1950
Creator: Riebe, John M. & MacLeod, Richard G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Strain-Gage Measurements of Buffeting Loads on a Jet-Powered Bomber Airplane

Description: Buffet boundaries, buffeting-load increments for the stabilizers and elevators, and buffeting bending-moment increments for the stabilizers and wings as measured in gradual maneuvers for a jet-powered bomber airplane are presented. The buffeting-load increments were determined from strain-gage measurements at the roots or hinge supports of the various surfaces considered. The Mach numbers of the tests ranged from 0.19 to 0.78 at altitudes close to 30,000 feet. The predominant buffet frequencies were close to the natural frequencies of the structural components. The buffeting-load data, when extrapolated to low-altitude conditions, indicated loads on the elevators and stabilizers near the design limit loads. When the airplane was held in buffeting, the load increments were larger than when recovery was made immediately.
Date: March 19, 1951
Creator: Aiken, William S., Jr. & See, John A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Free-Spinning-Tunnel Tests of a 1/18-Scale Model of the Fairchild XNQ-1 Airplane, TED No. NACA 2398

Description: Spin tests have been performed in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel on a 1/18-scale model of the Fairchild XNQ-1 airplane. The spin and recovery characteristics of the model were determined for the normal gross-weight loading and for two variations from this loading - center of gravity moved rearward and relative mass distribution increased along the fuselage. These tests were performed for two vertical-tail plan forms. The investigation also included simulated pilot-escape tests and rudder-force tests. The recovery characteristics of the model were satisfactory for all conditions tested by full reversal of the rudder and by simultaneous neutralization of the rudder and elevator. It was indicated that if necessary to escape from the spinning airplane, the pilot should jump from the outboard side of the fuselage and as far rearward as possible. Aa determined from spin model tests, the rudder pedal force required to reverse the rudder for recovery from the spin will be light.
Date: September 30, 1946
Creator: Daughtridge, Lee T., Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Supplementary Investigation in the Free-Spinning Tunnel of a 1/24-Scale Model of the Grumman F9F-6 Airplane Incorporating only Flaperons for Lateral Control, TED No. NACA DE 364

Description: A supplementary investigation was conducted in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel on a 1/24-scale model of the Grumman F9F-6 airplane. The primary purpose of the investigation was to reevaluate the spin-recovery characteristics of the airplane in view of the fact that the ailerons had been eliminated from the flaperon-aileron lateral control system of the airplane. A spin-tunnel investigation on a model of the earlier version of the F9F-6 airplane had indicated that use of ailerons with the spin (stick right in a right spin) was essential to insure recovery. The results indicate that with.ailerons eliminated, it may be difficult to obtain an erect developed spin but if a fully developed spin is obtained on the airplane, recovery therefrom may be difficult or impossible. Flaperon deflection should have little effect on spins or recoveries.
Date: November 18, 1954
Creator: Klinar, Walter J. & Lee, Henry A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Wind-Tunnel Investigation of the Static Longitudinal Stability Characteristics of a 0.15-Scale Model of the Hermes A-1E2 Missile at High Subsonic Mach Numbers

Description: The static longitudinal stability characteristics of a 0.15-scale model of the Hermes A-lE2 missile have been determined in the Langley high-speed 7- by 10-foot tunnel over a Mach number range of 0.50 to 0.98, corresponding to Reynolds numbers, based on body length, of 12.3 x 10(exp 6) to 17.1 x 10(exp 6). This paper presents results obtained with body alone and body-fins combinations at 0 degrees (one set of fins vertical and the other set horizontal) and 45 degree angle of roll. The results indicate that the addition of the fins to the body insures static longitudinal stability and provides essentially linear variations of the lift and pitching moment at small angles of attack throughout the Mach number range. The slopes of the lift and pitching-moment curves vary slightly with Mach number and show only small effects due to the angle of roll.
Date: September 11, 1952
Creator: Alford, William J., Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Investigation of Spinning and Tumbling Characteristics of a 1/20-Scale Model of the Consolidated Vultee XFY-1 Airplane in the Free-Spinning Tunnel, TED No. NACA DE 370

Description: An investigation has been conducted in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel on a l/20-scale model of the Consolidated Vultee XFY-1 airplane with a windmilling propeller simulated to determine the effects of control setting and movements upon the erect spin and recovery characteristics for a range of airplane-loading conditions. The effects on the model's spin-recovery characteristics of removing the lower vertical tail, removing the gun pods, and fixing the rudders at neutral were also investigated briefly. The investigation included determination of the size parachute required for emergency recovery from demonstration spins. The tumbling tendencies of the model were also investigated. Brief static force tests were made to determine the aerodynamic characteristics in pitch at high angles of attack. The investigation indicated that the spin and recovery characteristics of the airplane with propeller windmilling will be satisfactory for all loading conditions if recovery is attempted by full rudder reversal accompanied by simultaneous movement of the stick laterally to full with the spin (stick right in a right spin) and longitudinally to neutral. Inverted spins should be satisfactorily terminated by fully reversing the rudder followed immediately by moving the stick laterally towards the forward rudder pedal and longitudinally to neutral. Removal of the gun pods or fixing the rudders at neutral will not adversely affect the airplane's spin-recovery characteristics, but removal of the lower vertical tail will result in unsatisfactory spin-recovery characteristics. The model-test results showed that a 13.3-foot wing-tip conventional parachute (drag coefficient approximately 0.7) should be effective as an emergency spin-recovery device during demonstration spins of the airplane. It was indicated that the airplane should not tumble and that no unusual longitudinal-trim characteristics should be obtained for the center-of-gravity positions investigated.
Date: December 1, 1952
Creator: Lee, Henry A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Effects of Wing Leading-Edge Camber and Tip Modifications on the Aerodynamic Characteristics of a 1/20-Scale Model of the Convair F-102 Airplane at Transonic Speeds

Description: The effects of several wing leading-edge camber and deflected-tip modifications on the force and moment characteristics of a 1/20-scale model of the Convair F-102 airplane have been determined at Mach numbers from 0.60 t o 1.14 for angles of attack up to 14 deg. in the Langley 8-foot transonic tunnel. The effects of elevator deflections from 0 deg. to -10 deg. were also obtained for a configuration incorporating favorable leading- edge and tip modifications. Leading-edge modifications which had a small amount of constant-chord camber obtained by vertically adjusting the thickness distribution over the forward (3.9 percent of the mean aerodynamic chord) portion of the wing were ineffective in reducing the drag at lifting conditions at transonic speeds. Leading edges with relatively large cambers designed to support nearly elliptical span load distributions at lift coefficients of 0.15 and 0.22 near a Mach number of 1.0 produced substantial reductions in drag at most lift coefficients.
Date: November 10, 1954
Creator: Tempelmeyer, Kenneth E. & Osborne, Robert S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

An Estimation of the Flying Qualities of the Kaiser Fleetwing All-Wing Airplane from Tests of a 1/7-Scale Model, TED No. NACA 2340

Description: An investigation of a 1/7-scale powered model of the Kaiser Fleetwing all-wing airplane was made in the Langley full-scale tunnel to provide data for an estimation of the flying qualities of the airplane. The analysis of the stability and control characteristics of the airplane has been made as closely as possible in accordance with the requirements of the Bureau of Aeronautics, Navy Department's specifications, and a summary of the more significant conclusions is presented as follows. With the normal center of gravity located at 20 percent of the mean aerodynamic chord, the airplane will have adequate static longitudinal stability, elevator fixed, for all flight conditions except for low-power operation at low speeds where the stability will be about neutral. There will not be sufficient down-elevator deflection available for trim above speeds of about 130 miles per hour. It is probable that the reduction in the up-elevator deflections required for trim will be accompanied by reduced elevator hinge moments for low-power operation at low flight speeds. The static directional stability for this airplane will be low for all rudder-fixed or rudder-free flight conditions. The maximum rudder deflection of 30 deg will trim only about 15 deg yaw for most flight conditions and only 10 deg yaw for the condition with low power at low speeds. Also, at low powers and low speeds, it is estimated that the rudders will not trim the total adverse yaw resulting from an abrupt aileron roll using maximum aileron deflection. The airplane will meet the requirements for stability and control for asymmetric power operation with one outboard engine inoperative. The airplane would have no tendency for directional divergence but would probably be spirally unstable, with rudders fixed. The static lateral stability of the airplane will probably be about neutral for the high-speed flight conditions and will ...
Date: November 1946
Creator: Brewer, Gerald W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Determination of the Stresses Produced by the Landing Impact in the Bulkheads of a Seaplane Bottom

Description: The present report deals with the determination of the impact stresses in the bulkhead floors of a seaplane bottom. The dynamic problem is solved on the assumption of a certain elastic system, the floor being assumed as a weightless elastic beam with concentrated masses at the ends (due to the mass of the float) and with a spring which replaces the elastic action of the keel in the center. The distributed load on the floor is that due to the hydrodynamic force acting over a certain portion of the bottom. The pressure distribution over the width of the float is assumed to follow the Wagner law. The formulas given for the maximum bending moment are derived on the assumption that the keel is relatively elastic, in which case it can be shown that at each instant of time the maximum bending moment is at the point of juncture of the floor with the keel. The bending moment at this point is a function of the half width of the wetted surface c and reaches its maximum value when c is approximately equal to b/2 where b is the half width of the float. In general, however, for computing the bending moment the values of the bending moment at the keel for certain values of c are determined and a curve is drawn. The illustrative sample computation gave for the stresses a result approximately equal to that obtained by the conventional factory computation.
Date: January 1, 1944
Creator: Darevsky, V. M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Calibration and Measurement in Turbulence Research by the Hot-Wire Method

Description: The problem of turbulence in aerodynamics is at present being attacked both theoretically and experimentally. In view of the fact however that purely theoretical considerations have not thus far led to satisfactory results the experimental treatment of the problem is of great importance. Among the different measuring procedures the hot wire methods are so far recognized as the most suitable for investigating the turbulence structure. The several disadvantages of these methods however, in particular those arising from the temperature lag of the wire can greatly impair the measurements and may easily render questionable the entire value of the experiment. The name turbulence is applied to that flow condition in which at any point of the stream the magnitude and direction of the velocity fluctuate arbitrarily about a well definable mean value. This fluctuation imparts a certain whirling characteristic to the flow.
Date: June 1, 1947
Creator: Kovasznay, Kaszlo
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Static Longitudinal and Lateral Stability Characteristics of an 0.065-Scale Model of the Chance Vought XRSSM-N-9a (REGULUS II) Missile at Mach Numbers from 1.6 to 2.0 (TED No. NACA AD 3122)

Description: The static longitudinal and lateral stability charaetefistics of an 0.065-scale model of the XRSSM-N-9a (REGULUS II) Missile at Mach number range of 1.6 to 2.0 at a Reynolds number per foot of 2.0(exp 8).
Date: June 6, 1957
Creator: Hofstetter, William R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Stability and Control Characteristics of a 1/10-Scale Model of the McDonnell XP-85 Airplane While Attached to the Trapeze

Description: At the request of the Air Materiel Command, Army Air Forces, an investigation of the low-speed, power-off, stability and control characteristics of the McDonnell XP-85 airplane has been conducted in the Langley free-flight tunnel. The results of the portion of the investigation consisting of tests of a 1/10-scale model to study the stability of the XP-85 when attached to the trapeze and during retraction into the B-36 bomb bay are presented herein. In the power-off condition the stability was satisfactory with all oscillations well damped and the nose-restraining collar could be placed in position without difficulty. In a simulated power-on condition the model had a constant-amplitude rolling and sidewise motion and when the collar was layered, a violent motion resulted if the collar struck the model but failed to hold it in the proper manner. Folding of the wings and retraction into the bomb bay offered no problem once the airplane was properly held by the collar. It is recommended that the power be cut immediately after hooking on and that a restricting mechanism be incorporated in the center of the trapeze to eliminate the sidewise motion. It also appears desirable to have the retracting procedure controlled by the XP-85 pilot or an observer in the mother ship to insure that the parasite is in proper position after hooking up before bringing the collar down.
Date: November 17, 1947
Creator: Johnson, Joseph L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A Time History of Control Operation of a C-54 Airplane in Blind Landing Approaches

Description: Tests were made with a C-54 airplane in which airline pilots made several blind approaches to determine whether any special flying techniques were used in blind landings and whether any special handling-qualities requirements would have to be formulated because of such special techniques. It was found that the airplane was flown at all times in the normal manner; that is, all turns were banked turns that were nearly coordinated by use of the rudder so that the sideslip was held close to zero. The pilot expended considerable physical work in continually moving the controls but this wake was due in part to the large friction in the three control systems. The actual control deflections used were small compared to the maximum deflections available.
Date: July 18, 1947
Creator: Talmage, Donald B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Free-Spinning-Tunnel Tests of a 1/24-Scale Model of the McDonnell XP-88 Airplane with a VEE Tail

Description: An investigation of the spin and recovery characteristics of a 1/24-scale model of the McDonnell XP-88 airplane has been conducted in the Langley 20-ft free-spinning tunnel. Results of tests with a conventional tail have been previously reported; the results presented herein are for the model with a vee tail installed. The effects of control settings and movements on the erect and inverted spin and recovery characteristics of the model. In the normal loading were determined. Tests of the model in the long-range loading also were made. The investigation included leading-edge-flap, spin-recovery-parachute, and rudder-pedal-force tests. The recovery characteristics of the model were satisfactory for the normal loading. Deflecting the leading-edge flaps improved recoveries. The results indicated that with the external wing tanks installed (long-range loading) recoveries may be poor and, therefore, if a spin is inadvertently entered in this condition the tanks should be jettisoned if recovery does not appear imminent immediately after it is attempted. A 10-foot spin-recovery tail parachute with a towline 40 feet long and a drag coefficient of 0.63 was found to be effective for spin recovery. The rudder pedal force required for spin recovery was indicated to be within the capabilities of the pilot.
Date: November 28, 1947
Creator: Berman, Theodore
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Investigation of the Stability and Control Characteristics of a 1/20-Scale Model of the Consolidated Vultee XB-53 Airplane in the Langley Free-Flight Tunnel

Description: An investigation of the low-speed, power-off stability and control characteristics of a 1/20-scale model of the Consolidated Vultee XB-53 airplane has been conducted in the Langley free-flight tunnel. In the investigation it was found that with flaps neutral satisfactory flight behavior at low speeds was obtainable with an increase in height of the vertical tail and with the inboard slats opened. In the flap-down slat-open condition the longitudinal stability was satisfactory, but it was impossible to obtain satisfactory lateral-flight characteristics even with the increase in height of the vertical tail because of the negative effective dihedral, low directional stability, and large-adverse yawing moments of the ailerons.
Date: November 17, 1947
Creator: Bennett, Charles V.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Free-Spinning-Tunnel Tests of a 1/24-Scale Model of the North American XP-86 Airplane

Description: A spin investigation has been conducted in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel on a 1/24-scale model of the North American XP-86 airplane. The effects of control settings and movements upon the erect and inverted spin and recovery characteristics of the model were determined for the design gross weight loading. The long-range loading was also investigated and the effects of extending slats and dive flaps were determined. In addition, the investigation included the determination of the size of spin-recovery parachute required for emergency recovery from demonstration spins, the rudder force required to move the rudder for recovery, and the best method for the pilot to escape if it should become necessary to do so during a spin. The results of the investigation indicated that the XP-86 airplane will probably recover satisfactorily from erect and inverted spins for all possible loadings. It was found that fully extending both slats would be beneficial but that extending the dive brakes would cause unsatisfactory recoveries. It was determined that a 10.0-foot-diameter tail parachute with a drag coefficient of 0.7 and with a towline 30.0 feet long attached below the jet exit or a 6.0-foot-diameter wingtip parachute opened on the outer wing tip with a towline 6.0 feet long would insure recoveries from any spins obtainable. The rudder-pedal force necessary to move the rudder for satisfactory recovery was found to be within the physical capabilities of the pilot.
Date: May 17, 1948
Creator: Berman, Theodore
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department