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Flight Measurements of the Stability Characteristics of the Bell X-5 Research Airplane in Sideslips at 59 Deg Sweepback

Description: Flight measurements of the stability characteristics of the Bell X-5 research airplane at 59 deg sweepback were made in steady sideslips at Mach numbers from 0.62 to 0.97 at altitudes ranging between 35,000 and 40,000 feet. The results showed that the apparent directional stability was positive and increased at Mach numbers above 0.90. The apparent effective dihedral was positive and high, increasing at Mach numbers above 0.75. The cross-wind force coefficient per degree of sideslip was positive and increased rapidly at Mach numbers above 0.94.
Date: February 11, 1953
Creator: Childs, Joan M
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

NACA Conference on Aircraft Loads, Structures, and Flutter

Description: This document contains reproductions of technical papers on some of the most recent research results on aircraft loads, flutter, and structures from the NACA laboratories. These papers were presented by members of the staff of the NACA laboratories at the Conference held at the Langley Aeronautical Laboratory March 5, 6, and 7, 1957. The primary purpose of this Conference was to convey to contractors of the military services and others concerned with the design of aircraft these recent research results and to provide those attending an opportunity to discuss the results. The papers in this document are in the same form in which they were presented at the Conference in order to facilitate their prompt distribution. The original presentation and this record are considered as complementary to, rather than as substitutes for, the Committee?s more complete and formal reports. Accordingly, if information from this document is utilized it is requested that this document not be listed as a reference. Individual reports dealing with most of the information presented at the Conference will subsequently be published by NACA and will therefore be suitable as reference material.
Date: March 5, 1957
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

An Experimental Investigation of the Effect of Propellers Used as Aerodynamic Brakes on Stability and Control

Description: Tests were made of a model representative of a single-engine tractor-type airplane for the purpose of determining the stability and control effects of a propeller used as an aerodynamic brake. The tests were made with single-and dual-rotation propellers to show the effect of type of propeller rotation, and with positive thrust to provide basic data with which to compare the effects of negative thrust. Four configurations of the model were used to give the effects of tilting the propeller thrust axis down 5 deg., raising the horizontal tail, and combining both tilt and raised tail. Results of the tests are reported herein. The effects of negative thrust were found to be significant. The longitudinal stability was increased because of the loss of wing lift and increase of the angle of attack of the tail. Directional stability and both longitudinal and directional control were decreased because of the reduced velocity at the tail. These effects are moderate for moderate braking but become pronounced with full-power braking, particularly at high values of lift coefficient. The effects of model configuration changes were small when compared with the over-all effects of negative-thrust operation; however, improved stability and control characteristics were exhibited by the model with the tilted thrust axis. Raising the horizontal tail improved the longitudinal characteristics, but was detrimental to directional characteristics. The use of dual-rotation propeller reduced the directional trim charges resulting from the braking operation. A prototype airplane was assumed and handling qualities were computed and analyzed for normal (positive thrust) and braking operation with full and partial power. The results of these analyses are presented for the longitudinal characteristics in steady and accelerated flight, and for the directional characteristics in high- and low-speed flight. It was found that by limiting the power output of the engine (assuming the constant-speed propeller ...
Date: July 1, 1945
Creator: Hanson, Frederick H
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Static-Pressure Error of a Wing Airspeed Installation of the McDonnell XF-88 Airplane in Dives to Transonic Speeds

Description: Measurements were made, in dives to transonic speeds, of the static-pressure position error at a distance of one chord ahead of the McDonnell XF-88 airplane. The airplane incorporates a wing which is swept back 35 deg along the 0.22 chord line and utilizes a 65-series airfoil with a 9-percent-thick section perpendicular to the 0.25-chord line. The section in the stream direction is approximately 8-percent thick. Data up to a Mach number of about 0.97 were obtained within an airplane normal-force-coefficient range from about 0.05 to about 0.68. Data at Mach numbers above about 0.97 were obtained within an airplane normal-force-coefficient range from about 0.05 to about 0.68. Results of the measurements indicate that the static-pressure error, within the accuracy of measurement, is negligible from a Mach number of 0.65 to a Mach number of about 0.97. With a further increase in Mach number, the static-pressure error increases rapidly; at the highest Mach number attained in these tests (about M = 1.038), the error increases to about 8 percent of the impact pressure. Above a Mach number of about 0.975, the recorded Mach number remains substantially constant with increasing true Mach number; the installation is of no value between a Mach number of about 0.975 and at least 1.038, as the true Mach number cannot be obtained from the recorded Mach number in this range. Previously published data have shown that at 0.96 chord ahead of the wing tip of the straight-wing X-l airplanes, a rapid rise of position error started at a Mach number of about 0.8. In the case of the XF-88 airplane, this rise of position error was delayed, presumably by the sweep of the wing, to a Mach number of about 0.97.
Date: September 23, 1949
Creator: Goodman, Harold R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Vertical Descent and Landing Tests of a 0.13-Scale Model of the Convair XFY-1 Vertically Rising Airplane in Still Air, TED No. NACA DE 368

Description: An investigation is being conducted to determine the dynamic stability and control characteristics of a 0.13-scale flying model of Convair XFY-1 vertically rising airplane. This paper presents the results of flight and force tests to determine the stability and control characteristics of the model in vertical descent and landings in still air. The tests indicated that landings, including vertical descent from altitudes representing up to 400 feet for the full-scale airplane and at rates of descent up to 15 or 20 feet per second (full scale), can be performed satisfactorily. Sustained vertical descent in still air probably will be more difficult to perform because of large random trim changes that become greater as the descent velocity is increased. A slight steady head wind or cross wind might be sufficient to eliminate the random trim changes.
Date: March 4, 1954
Creator: Smith, Charlee C., Jr. & Lovell, Powell M., Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Supplementary Investigation in the Langley Free-Spinning Tunnel of a 1/20-Scale Model of the Douglas XF4D-1 Airplane Including Spin-Recovery Parachute Tests of the Model Loaded to Simulate the Douglas F5D-1 Airplane

Description: A supplementary investigation has been conducted in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel of a l/20-scale model of the Douglas XF4D-1 airplane to determine the effect of only neutralizing the rudder for recovery from an inverted spin, and the effect of partial aileron deflection with the spin for recovery from an erect spin. An estimation of the size parachute required for satisfactory recovery from a spin with the model ballasted to represent the Douglas F5D-1 (formerly the Douglas XF4D-2) airplane was also made. Results of the original investigation on the XF4D-1 design are presented in NACA RM SL50K30a. The results indicated that satisfactory recoveries from inverted spins of the airplane should be obtained by rudder neutralization when the longitudinal stick position is neutral or forward. Recoveries from erect spins from the normal-spin control configuration should be satisfactory by full rudder reversal with simultaneous movement of the ailerons to two-thirds with the spin. For the parachute tests with the model loaded to represent the F5D-1 airplane, the tests indicated that a 16.7-foot-diameter hemispherical-tail parachute (drag coefficient of 1.082 based on the projected area) with a towline 20.0 feet long (full- scale values) should be satisfactory for an emergency spin-recovery device during demonstration spins of the airplane.
Date: November 21, 1955
Creator: Klinar, Walter J. & Lee, Henry A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Free-Spinning-Tunnel Tests of a 1/18-Scale Model of the Fairchild XNQ-1 Airplane, TED No. NACA 2398

Description: Spin tests have been performed in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel on a 1/18-scale model of the Fairchild XNQ-1 airplane. The spin and recovery characteristics of the model were determined for the normal gross-weight loading and for two variations from this loading - center of gravity moved rearward and relative mass distribution increased along the fuselage. These tests were performed for two vertical-tail plan forms. The investigation also included simulated pilot-escape tests and rudder-force tests. The recovery characteristics of the model were satisfactory for all conditions tested by full reversal of the rudder and by simultaneous neutralization of the rudder and elevator. It was indicated that if necessary to escape from the spinning airplane, the pilot should jump from the outboard side of the fuselage and as far rearward as possible. Aa determined from spin model tests, the rudder pedal force required to reverse the rudder for recovery from the spin will be light.
Date: September 30, 1946
Creator: Daughtridge, Lee T., Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Supplementary Investigation in the Free-Spinning Tunnel of a 1/24-Scale Model of the Grumman F9F-6 Airplane Incorporating only Flaperons for Lateral Control, TED No. NACA DE 364

Description: A supplementary investigation was conducted in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel on a 1/24-scale model of the Grumman F9F-6 airplane. The primary purpose of the investigation was to reevaluate the spin-recovery characteristics of the airplane in view of the fact that the ailerons had been eliminated from the flaperon-aileron lateral control system of the airplane. A spin-tunnel investigation on a model of the earlier version of the F9F-6 airplane had indicated that use of ailerons with the spin (stick right in a right spin) was essential to insure recovery. The results indicate that with.ailerons eliminated, it may be difficult to obtain an erect developed spin but if a fully developed spin is obtained on the airplane, recovery therefrom may be difficult or impossible. Flaperon deflection should have little effect on spins or recoveries.
Date: November 18, 1954
Creator: Klinar, Walter J. & Lee, Henry A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Wind-Tunnel Investigation of the Static Longitudinal Stability Characteristics of a 0.15-Scale Model of the Hermes A-1E2 Missile at High Subsonic Mach Numbers

Description: The static longitudinal stability characteristics of a 0.15-scale model of the Hermes A-lE2 missile have been determined in the Langley high-speed 7- by 10-foot tunnel over a Mach number range of 0.50 to 0.98, corresponding to Reynolds numbers, based on body length, of 12.3 x 10(exp 6) to 17.1 x 10(exp 6). This paper presents results obtained with body alone and body-fins combinations at 0 degrees (one set of fins vertical and the other set horizontal) and 45 degree angle of roll. The results indicate that the addition of the fins to the body insures static longitudinal stability and provides essentially linear variations of the lift and pitching moment at small angles of attack throughout the Mach number range. The slopes of the lift and pitching-moment curves vary slightly with Mach number and show only small effects due to the angle of roll.
Date: September 11, 1952
Creator: Alford, William J., Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Investigation of Spinning and Tumbling Characteristics of a 1/20-Scale Model of the Consolidated Vultee XFY-1 Airplane in the Free-Spinning Tunnel, TED No. NACA DE 370

Description: An investigation has been conducted in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel on a l/20-scale model of the Consolidated Vultee XFY-1 airplane with a windmilling propeller simulated to determine the effects of control setting and movements upon the erect spin and recovery characteristics for a range of airplane-loading conditions. The effects on the model's spin-recovery characteristics of removing the lower vertical tail, removing the gun pods, and fixing the rudders at neutral were also investigated briefly. The investigation included determination of the size parachute required for emergency recovery from demonstration spins. The tumbling tendencies of the model were also investigated. Brief static force tests were made to determine the aerodynamic characteristics in pitch at high angles of attack. The investigation indicated that the spin and recovery characteristics of the airplane with propeller windmilling will be satisfactory for all loading conditions if recovery is attempted by full rudder reversal accompanied by simultaneous movement of the stick laterally to full with the spin (stick right in a right spin) and longitudinally to neutral. Inverted spins should be satisfactorily terminated by fully reversing the rudder followed immediately by moving the stick laterally towards the forward rudder pedal and longitudinally to neutral. Removal of the gun pods or fixing the rudders at neutral will not adversely affect the airplane's spin-recovery characteristics, but removal of the lower vertical tail will result in unsatisfactory spin-recovery characteristics. The model-test results showed that a 13.3-foot wing-tip conventional parachute (drag coefficient approximately 0.7) should be effective as an emergency spin-recovery device during demonstration spins of the airplane. It was indicated that the airplane should not tumble and that no unusual longitudinal-trim characteristics should be obtained for the center-of-gravity positions investigated.
Date: December 1, 1952
Creator: Lee, Henry A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Determination of the Stresses Produced by the Landing Impact in the Bulkheads of a Seaplane Bottom

Description: The present report deals with the determination of the impact stresses in the bulkhead floors of a seaplane bottom. The dynamic problem is solved on the assumption of a certain elastic system, the floor being assumed as a weightless elastic beam with concentrated masses at the ends (due to the mass of the float) and with a spring which replaces the elastic action of the keel in the center. The distributed load on the floor is that due to the hydrodynamic force acting over a certain portion of the bottom. The pressure distribution over the width of the float is assumed to follow the Wagner law. The formulas given for the maximum bending moment are derived on the assumption that the keel is relatively elastic, in which case it can be shown that at each instant of time the maximum bending moment is at the point of juncture of the floor with the keel. The bending moment at this point is a function of the half width of the wetted surface c and reaches its maximum value when c is approximately equal to b/2 where b is the half width of the float. In general, however, for computing the bending moment the values of the bending moment at the keel for certain values of c are determined and a curve is drawn. The illustrative sample computation gave for the stresses a result approximately equal to that obtained by the conventional factory computation.
Date: January 1, 1944
Creator: Darevsky, V. M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Calibration and Measurement in Turbulence Research by the Hot-Wire Method

Description: The problem of turbulence in aerodynamics is at present being attacked both theoretically and experimentally. In view of the fact however that purely theoretical considerations have not thus far led to satisfactory results the experimental treatment of the problem is of great importance. Among the different measuring procedures the hot wire methods are so far recognized as the most suitable for investigating the turbulence structure. The several disadvantages of these methods however, in particular those arising from the temperature lag of the wire can greatly impair the measurements and may easily render questionable the entire value of the experiment. The name turbulence is applied to that flow condition in which at any point of the stream the magnitude and direction of the velocity fluctuate arbitrarily about a well definable mean value. This fluctuation imparts a certain whirling characteristic to the flow.
Date: June 1, 1947
Creator: Kovasznay, Kaszlo
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Static Longitudinal and Lateral Stability Characteristics of an 0.065-Scale Model of the Chance Vought XRSSM-N-9a (REGULUS II) Missile at Mach Numbers from 1.6 to 2.0 (TED No. NACA AD 3122)

Description: The static longitudinal and lateral stability charaetefistics of an 0.065-scale model of the XRSSM-N-9a (REGULUS II) Missile at Mach number range of 1.6 to 2.0 at a Reynolds number per foot of 2.0(exp 8).
Date: June 6, 1957
Creator: Hofstetter, William R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Free-Spinning-Tunnel Tests of a 1/24-Scale Model of the McDonnell XP-88 Airplane with a VEE Tail

Description: An investigation of the spin and recovery characteristics of a 1/24-scale model of the McDonnell XP-88 airplane has been conducted in the Langley 20-ft free-spinning tunnel. Results of tests with a conventional tail have been previously reported; the results presented herein are for the model with a vee tail installed. The effects of control settings and movements on the erect and inverted spin and recovery characteristics of the model. In the normal loading were determined. Tests of the model in the long-range loading also were made. The investigation included leading-edge-flap, spin-recovery-parachute, and rudder-pedal-force tests. The recovery characteristics of the model were satisfactory for the normal loading. Deflecting the leading-edge flaps improved recoveries. The results indicated that with the external wing tanks installed (long-range loading) recoveries may be poor and, therefore, if a spin is inadvertently entered in this condition the tanks should be jettisoned if recovery does not appear imminent immediately after it is attempted. A 10-foot spin-recovery tail parachute with a towline 40 feet long and a drag coefficient of 0.63 was found to be effective for spin recovery. The rudder pedal force required for spin recovery was indicated to be within the capabilities of the pilot.
Date: November 28, 1947
Creator: Berman, Theodore
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Free-Spinning-Tunnel Tests of a 1/24-Scale Model of the North American XP-86 Airplane

Description: A spin investigation has been conducted in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel on a 1/24-scale model of the North American XP-86 airplane. The effects of control settings and movements upon the erect and inverted spin and recovery characteristics of the model were determined for the design gross weight loading. The long-range loading was also investigated and the effects of extending slats and dive flaps were determined. In addition, the investigation included the determination of the size of spin-recovery parachute required for emergency recovery from demonstration spins, the rudder force required to move the rudder for recovery, and the best method for the pilot to escape if it should become necessary to do so during a spin. The results of the investigation indicated that the XP-86 airplane will probably recover satisfactorily from erect and inverted spins for all possible loadings. It was found that fully extending both slats would be beneficial but that extending the dive brakes would cause unsatisfactory recoveries. It was determined that a 10.0-foot-diameter tail parachute with a drag coefficient of 0.7 and with a towline 30.0 feet long attached below the jet exit or a 6.0-foot-diameter wingtip parachute opened on the outer wing tip with a towline 6.0 feet long would insure recoveries from any spins obtainable. The rudder-pedal force necessary to move the rudder for satisfactory recovery was found to be within the physical capabilities of the pilot.
Date: May 17, 1948
Creator: Berman, Theodore
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Ditching Tests of a 1/24-Scale Model of the Lockheed XR60-1 Airplane, TED No. NACA 235

Description: The ditching characteristics of the Lockheed XR60-1 airplane were determined by tests of a 1/24-scale dynamic model in calm water at the Langley tank no. 2 monorail. Various landing attitudes, flap settings, speeds, and conditions of damager were investigated. The ditching behavior was evaluated from recordings of decelerations, length of runs, and motions of the model. Scale-strength bottoms and simulated crumpled bottoms were used to reproduce probable damage to the fuselage. It was concluded that the airplane should be ditched at a landing attitude of about 5 deg with flaps full down. At this attitude, the maximum longitudinal deceleration should not exceed 2g and the landing run will be bout three fuselage lengths. Damage to the fuselage will not be excessive and will be greatest near the point of initial contact with the water.
Date: January 1, 1948
Creator: Fisher, Lloyd J. & Cederborg, Gibson A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Preliminary Results of an Investigation by the Wing-Flow Method of the Longitudinal Stability Characteristics of a 1/50-Scale Semispan Model of the McDonnell XP-88 Airplane

Description: This paper presents the results of measurements of longitudinal stability of a 1/50-scale model of the XP-88 airplane by the wing-flow method. Lift, rolling-moment, hinge-moment, and pitching-moment characteristics as well as the downwash at the tail were measured over a Mach number range from approximately 0.5 to 1.05 at Reynolds numbers below 1,000,000. No measurements of drag were obtained. No abrupt changes due to Mach number were noted in any of the parameters measured. The data indicated that the wing was subject to early tip stalling; that the tail effectiveness decreased gradually with increasing Mach number up to M = 0.9, but increased again at higher Mach numbers; that the variation of downwash with angle of attack did not change appreciably with Mach number except between 0.95 and 1.0 where d(epsilon)/d(alpha), decreased from 0.46 to 0.32; that at zero lift with a stabilizer setting of -1.5 deg there was a gradually increasing nosing-up tendency with increasing Mach number; and that the control-fixed stability in maneuvers at constant speed gradually increased with increasing Mach number.
Date: June 9, 1948
Creator: Crane, Harold L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Spin Tests of 1/20-Scale Models of the Chance Vought Revised XF6U-1 and F6U-1 Airplanes, TED No. NACA 2390

Description: An investigation has been conducted in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel on the 1/20-scale model of the Chance Vought XF6U-1 airplane altered to represent the XF6U-1 airplane as it will be spin-tested in flight, and also altered to represent the F6U-1 airplane as it will be produced for service use. Spin tests were made to determine the effects of control settings and movements at the normal loading. The results show that the spins obtained on the revised XF6U-1 airplane will be oscillatory in roll and yaw and that recoveries by rudder reversal will be rapid. Model test results indicate that the F6U-1 airplane will probably not spin. Inasmuch as the results of this investigation show that the new designs are as good as or better than the original XF6U-1 design in regard to spin recovery, it is felt that the conclusions and recommendations reached for the original design can be applied to the new designs for all loading conditions.
Date: June 28, 1948
Creator: Klinar, Walter J. & Berman, Theodore
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Ditching Tests of Two Models of the Army B-36 Airplane

Description: The ditching characteristics of the Army B-36 airplane were determined by testing 1/20- and 1/30-scale dynamic models in calm water in Langley tank no. 2 and at the outdoor catapult. The scope of the tests consisted of ditching the models at various conditions of simulated damage, landing attitudes, and speeds, with various flap settings using several degrees of restraint of the flap hinges. The ditching behavior was evaluated from recordings of deceleration, length of run, and motions of the models. The results showed that the airplane should be ditched at an attitude of about 9 deg with flaps full down. The probable ditching behavior will be a smooth run with a maximum longitudinal deceleration of 3g to 4g and a landing run of 4 to 5 fuselage lengths. Structural failure of the underside of the fuselage will not seriously affect the behavior of the airplane.
Date: March 1, 1948
Creator: Fisher, Lloyd J. & Cederborg, Gibson A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Flight Tests of a 0.13-Scale Model of the Convair XFY-1 Vertically Rising Airplane with the Lower Vertical Tail Removed, TED No.DE 368

Description: An experimental investigation has been conducted to determine the dynamic stability and control characteristics in hovering and transition flight of a 0.13-scale flying model of the Convair XFY-1 vertically rising airplane with the lower vertical tail removed. The purpose of the tests was to obtain a general indication of the behavior of a vertically rising airplane of the same general type as the XFY-1 but without a lower vertical tail in order to simplify power-off belly landings in an emergency. The model was flown satisfactorily in hovering flight and in the transition from hovering to normal unstalled forward flight (angle of attack approximately 30deg). From an angle of attack of about 30 down to the lowest angle of attack covered in the flight tests (approximately 15deg) the model became progressively more difficult to control. These control difficulties were attributed partly to a lightly damped Dutch roll oscillation and partly to the fact that the control deflections required for hovering and transition flight were too great for smooth flight at high speeds. In the low-angle-of-attack range not covered in the flight tests, force tests have indicated very low static directional stability which would probably result in poor flight characteristics. It appears, therefore, that the attainment of satisfactory directional stability, at angles of attack less than 10deg, rather than in the hovering and transition ranges of flight is the critical factor in the design of the vertical tail for such a configuration.
Date: May 12, 1954
Creator: Lovell, Powell M., Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Free-Spinning-Tunnel Tests of a 1/24-Scale Model of the Grumman XF9F-2 Airplane, TED No. NACA DE 317

Description: An investigation of the spin and recovery characteristics of a scale model of the Grumman XF9F-2 airplane has been conducted in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel. The effects of control settings and movements on the erect and inverted spin and recovery characteristics of the model in the flight loading were determined. The investigation also included spin-recovery-parachute, pilot-escape, and rudder-pedal- . force tests. The recovery characteristics of the model were satisfactory for all configurations tested. Spins for the normal control configuration were oscillatory in roll and yaw. Deflecting the leading-edge flaps or the dive brakes did not change the spin and recovery characteristics of the model noticeably. A 10.0-foot tail parachute or a 6.0-foot wing-tip parachute (drag coefficient of 0.75) was found to be effective for recoveries from demonstration spins. The rudder forces in the spin appeared to be within the capabilities of the pilot.
Date: February 4, 1948
Creator: Berman, Theodore
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Ditching Tests of a 1/20-Scale Model of the Northrop B-35 Airplane

Description: Tests of a 1/20-scale dynamically similar model of the Northrop B-35 airplane were made to study its ditching characteristics. The model was ditched in calm water at the Langley tank no. 2 monorail. Various landing attitudes, speeds,and conditions of damage were simulated during the investigation. The ditching characteristics were determined by visual observation and from motion-picture records and time-history acceleration records. Both longitudinal and lateral accelerations were measured. Results are given in tabular form and time-history acceleration curves and sequence photographs are presented. Conclusions based on the model investigation are as follows: 1. The best ditching of the B-35 airplane probably can be made by contacting the water in a near normal landing attitude of about 9 deg with the landing flaps full down so as to have a low horizontal speed. 2. The airplane usually will turn or yaw but the motion will not be violent. The maximum lateral acceleration will be about 2g. 3. If the airplane does not turn or yaw immediately after landing, it probably will trim up and then make a smooth run or porpoise slightly. The maximum longitudinal decelerations that will be encountered are about 6g or 7g. 4. Although the decelerations are not indicated to be especially large, the construction of the airplane is such that extensive damage is to be expected, and it probably will be difficult to find ditching stations where crew members can adequately brace themselves and be reasonably sure of avoiding a large inrush of water.
Date: February 22, 1948
Creator: Fisher, Lloyd J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Take-Off and Landing Characteristics of a 0.13-Scale Model of the Convair XFY-1 Vertically Rising Airplane in Steady Winds, TED No. NACA DE 368

Description: An experimental investigation has been conducted to determine the stability and control characteristics of a 0.13-scale free-flight model of the Convair XFY-1 airplane during take-offs and landings in steady winds. The tests indicated that take-offs in headwinds up to at least 20 knots (full scale) will be fairly easy to perform although the airplane may be blown downstream as much as 3 spans before a trim condition can be established. The distance that the airplane will be blown down-stream can be reduced by restraining the upwind landing gear until the instant of take-off. The tests also indicated that spot landings in headwinds up to at least 30 knots (full scale) and in crosswinds up to at least 20 knots (full scale) can be accomplished with reasonable accuracy although, during the landing approach, there will probably be an undesirable nosing-up tendency caused by ground effect and by the change in angle of attack resulting from vertical descent. Some form of arresting gear will probably be required to prevent the airplane from rolling downwind or tipping over after contact. This rolling and tipping can be prevented by a snubbing line attached to the tip of the upwind' wing or tail or by an arresting gear consisting of a wire mesh on the ground and hooks on the landing gear to engage the mesh.
Date: June 22, 1954
Creator: Schade, Robert O.; Smith, Charles C., Jr. & Lovell, P. M., Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department