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The Hybrid Hero in Early Modern English Literature: A Synthesis of Classical and Contemplative Heroism

Description: In his Book of the Courtier, Castiglione appeals to the Renaissance notion of self-fashioning, the idea that individuals could shape their identity rather than relying solely on the influence of external factors such as birth, social class, or fate. While other early modern authors explore the practice of self-fashioning—Niccolò Machiavelli, for example, surveys numerous princes identifying ways they have molded themselves—Castiglione emphasizes the necessity of modeling one's-self after a variety of sources, "[taking] various qualities now from one man and now from another." In this way, Castiglione advocates for a self-fashioning grounded in a discriminating kind of synthesis, the generation of a new ideal form through the selective combination of various source materials. While Castiglione focuses on the moves necessary for an individual to fashion himself through this act of discriminatory mimesis, his views can explain the ways authors of the period use source material in the process of textual production. As poets and playwrights fashioned their texts, they did so by consciously combining various source materials in order to create not individuals, as Castiglione suggests, but characters to represent new cultural ideals and values. Early moderns viewed the process of textual, as well as cultural production, as a kind of synthesis. Creation through textual fusion is particularly common in early modern accounts of the heroic, in which authors synthesize classical conceptions of the hero, which privilege the completion of martial feats, and Christian notions of the heroic, based on the contemplative nature of Christ. In this dissertation, I demonstrate how Thomas Kyd in The Spanish Tragedy (1585), Edmund Spenser in The Faerie Queene (1590), William Shakespeare in Titus Andronicus (1594), and John Milton in A Mask Presented at Ludlow Castle (1632) syncretized classical and Christian notions of the heroic ideal in order to comment upon and shape political, social, ...
Date: December 2017
Creator: Ponce, Timothy Matthew
Partner: UNT Libraries

The relationship between training in learning style adaptation and successful completion of entry-level community college classes.

Description: The purpose of this study was to determine if there was a relationship between training in learning style adaptation and successful completion of community college courses. The rationale for conducting this study was based on the need for students to learn how to adapt their learning style in order to more effectively learn in any situation. It is also important that community colleges implement strategies that assist in student retention. The learning styles of entry-level community college students were measured using Kolb's Learning Style Inventory Version 3. Students enrolled in entry-level college courses at a small North Texas community college were studied. The Chi-square Test of Independence with a 2 x 2 design was employed. Findings indicated that there was no statistically significant difference in the relationship between students receiving training in learning styles adaptation and successful completion of entry-level college courses, and that students who attended a learning styles training session and those who did not attend a learning styles training session had an equal chance of succeeding in entry-level community college courses. Findings also indicated that students with Accommodating and Assimilating learning styles are less likely to successfully complete an entry-level college course than are students with Diverging or Converging learning styles, yet students with Diverging and Converging learning styles might withdraw from a course rather than risk being unsuccessful. Finally, findings indicated that students who are dissatisfied with the college course and with the instructor of the college course withdraw from college courses.
Date: December 2002
Creator: Ferrell, Dawn M.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Journal of Applied Rehabilitation Counseling, Volume 47, Number 3, Fall 2016

Description: Journal of Applied Rehabilitation Counseling is the official publication of the National Rehabilitation Counseling Association (NRCA). The JARC is published quarterly, Spring, Summer, Fall and Winter. JARC is a journal of opinion and research in professional rehabilitation counseling and addresses the needs of individuals employed in a wide variety of work settings and with wide-ranging professional interests. This edition of JARC sought to high light international trends and in the current issue (Vol. 47, No.3), the following articles were included: - Assessing Community Functioning and Independent Living Skills of Individuals with Severe Mental Illness (Jennifer Sanchez, Fong Chan, Rana Yaghmaian, Ebonee T. Johnson, Joseph S. Pfaller, and Emre Umucu), - Physical and Mental Health Behaviors among Individuals with Severe Mental Illness: A Comprehensive Needs Assessment (Jill L. Bezyak, Alena Clark, Chung-Yi Chiu, Fong Chan, and Nora Testerman) - Assessing Vocational Competency of People with Serious Mental Illness through Self-Report: A Brief Clinical Measure (Emre Umucu, Kanako Iwanaga, Sandra Fitzgerald, Kerry Thompson, Erin Moser, Jennifer Sanchez, Fong Chan, and Jessica Brooks), - Social Support and Persons with Psychiatric Disabilities: A Cluster Analysis (Julie Chronister, Chih-Chin Chou, Sandra Fitzgerald, and Hsin-Ya Liao), - Measurement Structure of an Abbreviated and Modified Version of the Adaptation to Disability Scale-Revised for Individuals with Severe Mental Illness (Jennifer Sanchez, Emre Umucu, Barbara Schoen, Erin F. Barnes, Fong Chan, and Jill L. Bezyak). .
Date: Autumn 2016
Creator: National Rehabilitation Counseling Association (U.S.)
Partner: UNT Libraries