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The Effect of Faculty Development on Active Learning in the College Classroom

Description: This study examined the effect of active learning seminars and a mentoring program on the use of active learning teaching techniques by college faculty. A quasi-experimental study was conducted using convenience samples of faculty from two private Christian supported institutions. Data for the study were collected from surveys and faculty course evaluations. The study lasted one semester. Faculty volunteers from one institution served as the experimental group and faculty volunteers from the second institution were the comparison group. The experimental group attended approximately eight hours of active learning seminars and also participated in a one-semester mentoring program designed to assist faculty in application of active learning techniques. Several individuals conducted the active learning seminars. Dr. Charles Bonwell, a noted authority on active learning, conducted the first three-hour seminar. Seven faculty who had successfully used active learning in their classrooms were selected to conduct the remaining seminars. The faculty-mentoring program was supervised by the researcher and conducted by department chairs. Data were collected from three surveys and faculty course evaluations. The three surveys were the Faculty Active Learning Survey created by the researcher, the Teaching Goals Inventory created by Angelo and Cross, and the college edition of Learner-Centered Practices by Barbara McCombs. The use of active learning techniques by the experimental group increased significantly more than the use by those in the convenience sample. No statistical difference was found in the change of professors' teaching beliefs or the course evaluation results.
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Date: May 2001
Creator: Evans, Cindy
Partner: UNT Libraries

Workshop: Digital Literacy in the College

Description: Video recording of a workshop presentation at the 2016 Digital Frontiers Annual Conference. In this workshop, Ron Thomas demonstrates an active-learning exercise wherein students create a presentation using an allusion-plus-image format in order to gloss allusions form the writer's text with images from the web.
Date: September 22, 2016
Creator: Thomas, Ron
Partner: UNT Libraries

Teaching Information Literacy: A Performance Based Cycle

Description: This presentation discusses teaching information literacy and a project to assess student searching skills. It includes background information on the project, discusses the performance cycle of information literacy, active teaching, learning, and assessing, student navigation skills, and software and strategies.
Date: December 2007
Creator: Downey, Annie & Byerly, Gayla
Partner: UNT Libraries

Simple Ways to Add Active Learning to Your Library Instruction

Description: This paper discusses library instruction. Assessments are recommended to determine the effectiveness of student learning. This paper also discusses a project by the UNT Libraries' in which they developed software to assess library instruction, called Library Instruction Software for Assessment (LISA) and the outcome of that study.
Date: 2008
Creator: Downey, Annie; Ramin, Lilly & Byerly, Gayla
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Effects of Interactive Reviews and Learning Style on Student Learning Outcomes at a Texas State University

Description: This study investigated the effects of interactive lessons and learning style on student learning outcomes in self-defense education classes. The study utilized an experimental design that incorporated four self-defense education classes at the University of North Texas (UNT) during the fall semester 2007 (N = 87). A pre-test was administered during the first week of class to determine prior knowledge of the participants. The Visual Auditory Reading/Kinesthetic Inventory (VARK) was used to assess the learning styles of the students and was completed after the pre-test of knowledge was administered. The treatment group received the interactive lesson and the control received a paper review. The difference between the pre and posttest was used as a measure of improvement of the student's learning outcomes. A 2 (treatment/control) by 2 (pretest/posttest) ANOVA with repeated measures was conducted to examine the differential improvement in knowledge across the intervention. Based on the 2-way ANOVA there was a significant difference between the treatment group and the control group based on their learning outcomes. A repeated measures ANOVA was conducted to determine if there was a significant difference between the groups based on the pre and post test scores. Based on the results of a one week study it was determined that interactive lessons do make a significant impact on learning outcomes compared to traditional reviews.
Date: May 2008
Creator: Adams, Wesley
Partner: UNT Libraries