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Use of CHELEX-100{reg_sign} for radionuclide purification

Description: A method for selectively removing yttrium-90 from its parent strontium-90 contained in an environmental sample includes loading the sample onto a column containing a chelating ion-exchange resin capable of retaining yttrium-90; washing the column with a solution capable of removing strontium, calcium and other contaminants from the yttrium-90 fraction retained on the column; removing excess acetate salts from the column; eluting yttrium-90 solution from the column and adjusting the pH of this solution to about 2.7; filtering the yttrium-90 solution and weighting this solution for gravimetric yield; and, counting the yttrium-90 containing solution with a radiological counter for a time sufficient to achieve the statistical accuracy desired. It is preferred that the chelating ion-exchange resin is a bidente ligand having the chemical name iminodiacetic acid mounted on a divinyl benzene substrate, converted from sodium form to ammonia form. Its name is Chelex-100{reg_sign}.
Date: December 1993
Creator: Huntley, M. W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

On-site laboratory support of Oak Ridge National Laboratory environmental restoration field activities

Description: A remedial investigation/feasibility study has been undertaken at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Bechtel National, Inc. and partners CH2M Hill, Ogden Environmental and Energy Services, and PEER Consultants are contracted to Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, performing this work for ORNL`s Environmental Restoration (ER) Program. An on-site Close Support Laboratory (CSL) established at the ER Field Operations Facility has evolved into a laboratory where quality analytical screening results can be provided rapidly (e.g., within 24 hours of sampling). CSL capabilities include three basic areas: radiochemistry, chromatography, and wet chemistry. Radiochemical analyses include gamma spectroscopy, tritium and carbon-14 screens using liquid scintillation analysis, and gross alpha and beta counting. Cerenkov counting and crown-ether-based separation are the two rapid methods used for radiostrontium determination in water samples. By extending count times where appropriate, method detection limits can match those achieved by off-site contract laboratories. Volatile organic compounds are detected by means of gas chromatography using either headspace or purge and trap sample introduction (based on EPA 601/602). Ionic content of water samples is determined using ion chromatography and alkalinity measurement. Ion chromatography is used to quantify both anions (based on EPA 300) and cations. Wet chemistry procedures performed at the CSL include alkalinity, pH (water and soil), soil resistivity, and dissolved/suspended solids. Besides environmental samples, the CSL routinely screens health and safety and waste management samples. The cost savings of the CSL are both direct and indirect.
Date: July 1, 1995
Creator: Burn, J.L.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A process for the separation and purification of yttrium-90 for medical applications

Description: An extraction chromatographic method for the preparation of {sup 90}Y of high chemical and radiochemical purity is disclosed. After an initial purification of a {sup 90}Sr stock solution and a suitable period of {sup 90}Y ingrowth, the solution is passed through a series of strontium-selective chromatographic columns, each of which lowers the {sup 90}Sr content of the mixture by a factor of about 10{sup 3}. The {sup 90}Y remaining is freed from any residual {sup 90}Sr, from its {sup 90}Zr daughter, and from any remaining impurities by passing the sample through a final column designed to selectively retain yttrium.
Date: January 1, 1993
Creator: Horwitz, P.E. & Dietz, M.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

SMALL-ORDER SHAPE FACTORS IN In$sup 114$, P$sup 32$, AND Y$sup 9$$sup 0$

Description: The beta spectra of In/sup 114/, P/sup 32/, and Y/sup 90/ were stud ied closely in an intermediate-image beta-ray spectrometer and compared to theoretical predictions in terms of a linear shape factor of the form (1 + aW). The values obtained for a were s for P/sup 32/, and (-0.0047 plus or minus 0.0008)/mc/sup 2/ for Y/sup 90/, all for electron kinetic energies from about 200 kev up to near the maximum beta energies. Tests were made to give indications for spectrometer fidelity. Because of the linearity of the shape-factor plots and the similarity in energy range, the comparative results from In/sup 114/, P/ sup 32/, and Y/sup 90/ are tak en as a definite indication that for at least two of these activities the shape factors have nonzero slopes, irrespective of questions of instrumental fidelity. (auth)
Date: April 1, 1961
Creator: Nichols, R.T.; McAdams, R.E. & Jensen, E.N.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

In-Situ, Long-Term Monitoring System for Radioactive Contaminants

Description: This report presents the results of the first phase of the project entitled ''In-situ, Long-term Monitoring System for Radioactive Contaminants.'' Phase one of this effort included four objectives, each with specific success criteria. The first objective was to produce dosimetry grade fibers and rods of aluminum oxide. The success criterion for this milestone was the production of aluminum oxide rods and fibers that have a minimum measurable dose (MMD) of 100 mrem or less. This milestone was completed and the MMD for the rods was measured to be 1.53 mrem. Based on the MMD, the ability of the sensor to measure {sup 137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y, and {sup 99}Tc was evaluated. It was determined that the sensor can measure the release limit of these radionuclides (50 pCi/cm{sup 3}) in 150 h, 200 h, and 54,000 h, respectively. The monitor is adequate for measuring {sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y but is unsuitable for measuring {sup 99}Tc in soil. The second objective was to construct a prototype sensor (dosimeter and fiber optic channel). There were three success criteria for this milestone: (1) Perform measurements with the sensor for both gamma and beta radiation with a standard deviation of 10% or less; (2) Demonstrate the ability of the sensor to discriminate between gamma and beta radiation; and (3) Obtain similar or relatable results for differing lengths of fiber optic cable. These milestones were met. The sensor was able to measure gamma radiation repeatedly with a standard deviation of 3.15% and beta radiation with a standard deviation of 2.85%. Data is presented that demonstrates that an end cap can be used to discriminate between beta plus gamma radiation using beta radiation from a {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y source, and gamma radiation alone. It is shown that some amount of attenuation occurs in longer fiber ...
Date: October 1, 2002
Creator: Durham, James S.; McKeever, Stephen W. S. & Akselrod, Mark S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

In-Situ, Long-Term Monitoring System for Radioactive Contaminants

Description: This report presents the results of the first phase of the project entitled ''In-situ, Long-term Monitoring System for Radioactive Contaminants.'' Phase one of this effort included four objectives, each with specific success criteria. The first objective was to produce dosimetry grade fibers and rods of aluminum oxide. The success criterion for this milestone was the production of aluminum oxide rods and fibers that have a minimum measureable dose (MMD) of 100 mrem or less. This milestone was completed and the MMD for the rods was measured to be 1.53 mrem. Based on the MMD, the ability of the sensor to measure {sup 137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y, and {sup 99}Tc was evaluated. It was determined that the sensor can measure the release limit of these radionuclides (50 pCi/cm{sup 3}) in 150 h, 200 h, and 54,000 h, respectively. The monitor is adequate for measuring {sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y but is unsuitable for measuring {sup 99}Tc in soil. The second objective was to construct a prototype sensor (dosimeter and fiber optic channel). There were three success criteria for this milestone: (1) Perform measurements with the sensor for both gamma and beta radiation with a standard deviation of 10% or less; (2) Demonstrate the ability of the sensor to discriminate between gamma and beta radiation; and (3) Obtain similar or relatable results for differing lengths of fiber optic cable. These milestones were met. The sensor was able to measure gamma radiation repeatedly with a standard deviation of 3.15% and beta radiation with a standard deviation of 2.85%. Data is presented that demonstrates that an end cap can be used to discriminate between beta plus gamma and gamma radiation. It is shown that some amount of attenuation occurs in longer fiber optic cables, but it is unclear if the attenuation is due ...
Date: October 1, 2002
Creator: Durham, James S.; McKeever, Stephen W. S. & Akselrod, Mark S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Dosimetry and quantitative radionuclide imaging in radioimmunotherapy: Final report, July 15, 1992-July 14, 1996

Description: Brief summaries of the principal accomplishments of this project on the development of quantitative SPECT for high energy photons (87Y, 19F) and stability testing of 87Y-labeled antibodies in the nude mouse model, development of an unified approach to photon and beta particle dosimetry, quantitative SPECT for nonuniform attenuation, and development of patient-specific dosimetry in radioimmunotherapy.
Date: September 1, 1996
Creator: Leichner, P.K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Doses to the hand during the administration of radiolabeled antibodies containing Y-90, Tc-99m, I-131, and Lu-177

Description: Exposure of the hands of medical personnel administering radiolabeled antibodies (RABs) was evaluated on the basis of (a) observing and photo-documenting administration techniques, and (b) experimental data on doses to thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) on fingers of phantom hands holding syringes, and on syringes, with radionuclides in the syringes in each case. Actual exposure data for I-131 and Lu-177 were obtained in field studies. Variations in handling and administration techniques were identified. Dose rates measured using TLDs on the surface of loaded syringes were adjusted for differences in electronic stopping power, absorption coefficients, and attenuation between dosimeters and tissue to estimate dose-to-skin averaged over 1 cm{sup 2} at 7 mg cm{sup {minus}2} depth for Y-90, Tc-99m, I-131, and Lu-177. Dose rate coefficients to the skin, if in contact with the syringe wall, were 89, 1.9, 3.8, and 0.41 {micro}Sv s{sup {minus}1} per 37 MBq (1 mCi) for Y-90, Tc-99m, I-131, and Lu-177, respectively. For dose reduction, when using Y-90 the importance was clearly indicated of (a) avoiding direct contact with syringes containing RABs, if practical, and (b) using a beta-particle shield on the syringe. In using a syringe for injection, doses can best be approximated for the geometry studied by (a) wearing a finger dosimeter on the middle finger, toward the outside of the hand, on the hand operating the plunger, and (b) wearing finger dosimeters on the inner (palm) side of the finger on the hand that supports the syringe for energetic beta-particle emitters, such as Y-90 and Re-188.
Date: February 1997
Creator: Barber, D. E.; Carsten, A. L.; Kaurin, D. G. L. & Baum, J. W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Improved radioimmunotherapy of hematologic malignancies. Final technical report

Description: Experiments were performed to study the rates of endocytosis, intracellular routing, and metabolic degradation of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies targeting tumor-associated antigens on human leukemia and lymphoma cells. An attempt was made to examine in vivo the effects of lysosomotropic amines and thioamides on the retention of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies by tumor cells. Experiments also examined the impact of newer radioiodination techniques on the metabolic degradation of radioiodinated antibodies, and on the radioimmunoscintigraphy and radioimmunotherapy of neoplasms. The endocytosis, intracellular routing, and degradation of radioimmunoconjugates prepared with I-131, In-111, and Y-90 were compared. The utility of radioimmunoconjugates targeting oncogene products for the radioimmunotherapy and radioimmunoscintigraphy of cancer was investigated.
Date: August 15, 1996
Creator: Press, O.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Human dose assessment for the radionuclides {sup 90}Sr and {sup 90}Y at TA-35 SWMU 35-003 (r) and Ten Site Canyon

Description: This report gives an estimate of the radiological dose to an individual living on or working at a site contaminated with strontium-90 ({sup 90}Sr) and yttrium-90 ({sup 90}Y). The site consists of a small receiving canyon that drains into Ten-Site Canyon at the eastern end of Los Alamos National Laboratory`s technical area 35 (TA-35). Between 1951 and 1963 a wastewater treatment facility located at TA-35 discharged water containing {sup 90}Sr and {sup 90}Y to this receiving canyon. The authors used the RESRAD computer code to calculate the dose to an on-site individual, based on two exposure scenarios: (1) a person working at the site for eight hours a day, five days a week, for twenty-five years and (2) a farmer living at the site twenty four hours a day, seven days a week, for thirty years. The exposure pathways considered were direct exposure to external radiation; inhalation of contaminated dusts; and ingestion of plants, water, and soil. The authors found that the maximum estimated dose rates were 1 and 21 mrem y{sup {minus}1} for the worker and farmer scenarios respectively. The authors have concluded that the value for the worker scenario is well below the DOE dose limit of 100 mrem y{sup {minus}1} but the farmer is overexposed.
Date: July 1, 1997
Creator: Jarmer, D. & Lyman, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Operational strategy for soil concentration predictions of strontium/yttrium-90 and cesium-137 in surface soil at the West Valley Demonstration Project site

Description: There are difficulties associated with the assessment of the interpretation of field measurements, determination of guideline protocols and control and disposal of low level radioactive contaminated soil in the environmental health physics field. Questions are raised among scientists and in public forums concerning the necessity and high costs of large area soil remediation versus the risks of low-dose radiation health effects. As a result, accurate soil activity assessments become imperative in decontamination situations. The West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP), a US Department of Energy facility located in West Valley, New York is managed and operated by West Valley Nuclear Services Co., Inc. (WVNS). WVNS has identified contaminated on-site soil areas with a mixed variety of radionuclides (primarily fission product). Through the use of data obtained from a previous project performed during the summer of 1994 entitled ``Field Survey Correlation and Instrumentation Response for an In Situ Soil Measurement Program`` (Myers), the WVDP offers a unique research opportunity to investigate the possibility of soil concentration predictions based on exposure or count rate responses returned from a survey detector probe. In this study, correlations are developed between laboratory measured soil beta activity and survey probe response for the purposes of determining the optimal detector for field use and using these correlations to establish predictability of soil activity levels.
Date: June 5, 1995
Creator: Myers, J.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Time-specific measurements of energy deposition from radiation fields in simulated sub-micron tissue volumes

Description: A tissue-equivalent spherical proportional counter is used with a modified amplifier system to measure specific energy deposited from a uniform radiation field for short periods of time ({approximately}1 {micro}s to seconds) in order to extrapolate to dose in sub-micron tissue volumes. The energy deposited during these time intervals is compared to biological repair processes occurring within the same intervals after the initial energy deposition. The signal is integrated over a variable collection time which is adjusted with a square-wave pulse. Charge from particle passages is collected on the anode during the period in which the integrator is triggered, and the signal decays quickly to zero after the integrator feedback switch resets; the process repeats for every triggering pulse. Measurements of energy deposited from x rays, {sup 137}Cs gamma rays, and electrons from a {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y source for various time intervals are taken. Spectral characteristics as a function of charge collection time are observed and frequency plots of specific energy and collection time-interval are presented. In addition, a threshold energy flux is selected for each radiation type at which the formation of radicals (based on current measurements) in mammalian cells equals the rate at which radicals are repaired.
Date: July 7, 1997
Creator: Famiano, M.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

[Studies of biologic activation associated with molecular receptor increase and tumor response in ChL6/L6 protocol patients; Studies in phantoms; Quantitative SPECT; Preclinical studies; and Clinical studies]. DOE annual report, 1994--95

Description: The authors describe results which have not yet been published from their associated studies listed in the title. For the first, they discuss Lym-1 single chain genetically engineered molecules, analysis of molecular genetic coded messages to enhance tumor response, and human dosimetry and therapeutic human use radiopharmaceuticals. Studies in phantoms includes a discussion of planar image quantitation, counts coincidence correction, organ studies, tumor studies, and {sup 90}Y quantitation with Bremsstrahlung imaging. The study on SPECT discusses attenuation correction and scatter correction. Preclinical studies investigated uptake of {sup 90}Y-BrE-3 in mice using autoradiography. Clinical studies discuss image quantitation verses counts from biopsy samples, S factors for radiation dose calculation, {sup 67}Cu imaging studies for lymphoma cancer, and {sup 111}In MoAb imaging studies for breast cancer to predict {sup 90}Y MoAb therapy.
Date: December 31, 1995
Creator: DeNardo, S.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Preparation and validation of gross alpha/beta samples used in EML`s quality assessment program

Description: A set of water and filter samples have been incorporated into the existing Environmental Measurements Laboratory`s (EML) Quality Assessment Program (QAP) for gross alpha/beta determinations by participating DOE laboratories. The participating laboratories are evaluated by comparing their results with the EML value. The preferred EML method for measuring water and filter samples, described in this report, uses gas flow proportional counters with 2 in. detectors. Procedures for sample preparation, quality control and instrument calibration are presented. Liquid scintillation (LS) counting is an alternative technique that is suitable for quantifying both the alpha ({sup 241}Am, {sup 230}Th and {sup 238}Pu) and beta ({sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y) activity concentrations in the solutions used to prepare the QAP water and air filter samples. Three LS counting techniques (Cerenkov, dual dpm and full spectrum analysis) are compared. These techniques may be used to validate the activity concentrations of each component in the alpha/beta solution before the QAP samples are actually prepared.
Date: October 1, 1997
Creator: Scarpitta, S.C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Radioimmunotherapy: Development of an effective approach. Annual report, 1991

Description: We plan to extend our success in treating B cell malignancies with {sup 131}I labeled Lym-1 by a major effort in therapy with {sup 67}Cu Lym-1. Yttrium-90 labeled by a macrocycle, DOTA will be studied in patients as a continuation of the {sup 111}In-BAD (DOTA) Lym-1 studies. Excellent images and pharmacokinetics of the {sup 111}In-BAD(DOTA)-Lym-1 studies. Lymphomas and related diseases represent a special case for radioimmunotherapy because of their documented radiosensitivity and immunodeficiency, and thus offer a unique opportunity to conduct therapeutic feasibility studies in a responsive human model. Using marine and chimeric L6 and other MoAb to breast cancer, we have applied the strategies that were developed in taking Lym-1 antibody from the bench to the patient. We have examined a number of monoclonal antibodies for treatment of breast cancer and chose chimeric L6 for prototype studies because of certain characteristics. The chemistry of attachment of conjugates to antibodies and their impact on immunological targeting biological activities (cytotoxicity), metabolic fate, and therapeutic index will continue to be a major strength and function of this program. This grant has supported the conception, synthesis, and development of the first macrocylic, bifunctional chelating agent TETA (6-p-nitrobenzyl-1,4,8,11-tetraazatetradecane-N,N{prime},N{double_prime}, N{prime}{double_prime}-tetraacetic acid and its derivatives, including Lym-1-2IT-BAT), for use in Cu-67-based radioimmunodiagnosis and therapy. This work has led to the further development of several new macrocylic bifunctional chelating agents for copper, indium, yttrium and other metals. In addition, successful Cu-67 labelings of Lym-1-2IT-BAT for human radiopharmaceutical have shown patient pharmacokinetics of {sup 67}Cu-BAT(TETA)-Lym-1 with promising therapeutic dosimetry.
Date: December 31, 1991
Creator: DeNardo, S. J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

FISSION YIELDS OF Sr$sup 9$$sup 0$

Description: Fission yields were determined from 14-Mev neutrons on U/sup 235/ and U/ sup 238/, thermal neutrons on U/sup 235/, and fission spectrum neutrons on U/sup 235/, U/sup 238/, and Pu/sup 239/. The number of fissions was determined for the Mo/sup 99/ activity. The Sr/sup 90/ was chemically separated and Y/sup 90/ allowed to reach equilibrium. The Y/sup 90/ was separated and counted. (W.D.M.)
Date: October 28, 1957
Creator: Bayhurst, B.P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

MILKING SYSTEMS--STATUS OF THE ART

Description: A review is preserted of milking systems for separating a desired radioisotope from its parent and other contaminants. Milking systems are considered for the separation of the following radioisotopes: Zr/sup 95/ from Nb/ sup 95/, I/sup 132/ from Te/sup 132/, La/sup 140/, from Ba/sup 140/ Ba/sup 137/ from Cs/sup 137/ Y/sup 90 / from Sr/sup 90/ Tc/sup 99m/ from Mo/sup 99/, Ga/sup 68/, from Ge/sup 68/, Al/sup 28/ from Mg/sup 28/, etc. (D.L.C.)
Date: January 1, 1962
Creator: Greene, M.W.; Doering, R.F. & Hillman, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Improvements in design of a $sup 90$Sr--$sup 90$Y portable blood irradiator

Description: From 26th conference on engineering in medicine and biology; Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA (30 Sep 1973). Irradiation of blood in an exteriorized loop (extracorporeal irradiation of blood, ECIB) suppresses lymphocyte levels without damage to other body tissues. This is an effective adjunct or alternative to drug therapy for treating some forms of leukemia. Acceptance times of skin allografts have been extended by EClB and the technique has been evaluated for its applicability for immunosuppression relative to renal allografts. Most treatments of both experimental animals and humans have been accomplished by shunting blood through large fixed equipment such as /sup 60/Co, / sup 137/Cs, or X-ray sources, thereby necessitating specialized facilities. With the relatively long treatment regimes required, this severely limits the numbers of patients who can receive treatment and requires the inconvenience and expense of hospitalization. A small inexpensive portable /sup 90/Sr-/sup 90/Y gamma blood irradiator is describe d that will permit chronic exposures of patients prior to and subsequent to kidney transplant. (CH)
Date: April 30, 1974
Creator: Hungate, F P; Griffin, B I; Cross, F T & Riemath, W F
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department