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Americans who did not wait: the American Legion of the Canadian Expeditionary Force, 1915-1917

Description: This study examines the five American Legion battalions of the Canadian Expeditionary Force formed in 1915 specifically to recruit American volunteers for the Canadian overseas contingent of the First World War. This study reviews the organization of Canada's militia and Anglo-American relations before examining the formation of the American Legion, the background of its men, and the diplomatic repercussions it sparked. This study is based largely on material in the Public Archives of Canada including war records and the personal papers of several participants. During its brief existence, the American Legion precipitated constitutional, diplomatic, and political problems. The issues the American Legion raised were mostly solved by America's entry in the war. The episode hastened the maturity of Canada as a nation.
Date: May 1996
Creator: Smylie, Eric
Partner: UNT Libraries

Yesterday There Was Glory: With the 4th Division, A.E.F., in World War I

Description: Memoir describing historical events and personal accounts of Gerald Andrew Howell based on his experiences during World War I, originally completed in 1946 : "His narrative was a study of a small group of American soldiers attempting to survive some of the most ferocious combat of the 'Great War.' He included information on the movements and activities of his 39th Infatry Regiment and the 4th Division, but Howell kept the focus of the story on his squad, a typical cross section of the A.E.F. {American Expeditionary Forces]" (p. 2) This edited version has some introductory and supplementary information and has made minor corrections to the original text. Index starts on page 338.
Access: Restricted to UNT Community Members. Login required if off-campus.
Date: September 2017
Creator: Howell, Gerald Andrew & Patrick, Jeffrey L.
Partner: UNT Press

A Machine-Gunner in France: The Memoirs of Ward Schrantz, 35th Division, 1917-1919

Description: This is the WWI memoir of Ward Schrantz, a National Guard officer and machine gun company commander in the Kansas-Missouri 35th Division. He extensively documents his experiences and those of his men, from training at Camp Doniphan to their voyage across the Atlantic, and to their time in the trenches in France’s Vosges Mountains and ultimately to their return home. He devotes much of his memoir to the Meuse-Argonne Offensive, in which the 35th Division suffered heavy casualties and made only moderate gains before being replaced by fresh troops. Schrantz also describes the daily life of a soldier, including living conditions, relations between officers and enlisted men, and the horrific experience of combat. Editor Jeffrey Patrick combines his narrative with excerpts from a detailed history of the unit that Schrantz wrote for his local newspaper, and also provides an editor’s introduction and annotations.
Access: Restricted to UNT Community Members. Login required if off-campus.
Date: April 2019
Creator: Schrantz, Ward L. & Patrick, Jeffrey L.
Partner: UNT Press

Opportunity's one knock.

Description: A woman (Opportunity) knocks on a door labeled W.S.S. with a knocker that has "THRIFT" on it. She holds a basket of money. Extended text in red and black fills most of the page; it is a quote by James J. Hill.
Date: unknown
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

What Libraries Learned from the War.

Description: Pamphlet containing lessons learned by librarians during their service in World War I. Topics covered include how men were not influenced by books or libraries, that libraries must be organized, and that libraries could be used to foster the understanding of world problems.
Date: January 1922
Creator: Milam, Carl Hastings, 1884-1963
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Women, War, and Work: British Women in Industry 1914 to 1919

Description: This thesis examines the entry of women, during World War I, into industrial employment that men had previously dominated. It attempts to determine if women's wartime activities significantly changed the roles women played in industry and society. Major sources consulted include microfilm of the British Cabinet Minutes and British Cabinet Papers; Parliamentary Debates; memoirs of contemporaries like David Lloyd George, Beatrice Webb, Sylvia Pankhurst, and Monica Cosens; and contemporary newspapers. The examination begins with the early debates concerning the pressing need for labor in war industries, women's recruitment into industry, women's work and plans, the government's arrangements for demobilization, and women's roles in postwar industry. The thesis concludes that women were treated as a transient commodity by the government and the trade unions.
Date: August 1993
Creator: Kimball, Toshla (Toshla Rene)
Partner: UNT Libraries

Food will win the war : you came here seeking freedom, you must now help to preserve it : wheat is needed for the Allies, waste nothing.

Description: Color poster of people standing on a boat or shoreline near the sea. They appear to be European immigrants. In the foreground, a man appears to be pleading with a woman holding a basket of food. In the background can be seen part of a large ship, the Statue of Liberty, and a rainbow stretching across the New York skyline. A man waves his cap in that direction.
Date: 1918
Creator: Chambers, Charles Edward, ca. 1883-1941.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

For home and country : Victory Liberty Loan.

Description: Color image of a happy military family. A soldier holds his young son in one arm while embracing his wife with the other. A helmet hangs on a long cord around the soldier's neck. The child smiles and embraces the soldier while the wife admires a medal attached to the soldier's uniform.
Date: 1918
Creator: Orr, Alfred Everitt, 1886-
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

U.S. World War I (1917-1918) Centennial

Description: This report outlines background information and congressional actions regarding the 100th anniversary of the U.S. Declaration of War resolution against Germany and subsequent entry in "The Great War" (World War I).
Date: March 13, 2017
Creator: Salazar Torreon, Barbara
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

They Called Them Soldier Boys: a Texas Infantry Regiment in World War I

Description: They Called Them Soldier Boys offers an in-depth study of soldiers of the Texas National Guard’s Seventh Texas Infantry Regiment in World War I, through their recruitment, training, journey to France, combat, and their return home. Gregory W. Ball focuses on the fourteen counties in North, Northwest, and West Texas where officers recruited the regiment’s soldiers in the summer of 1917, and how those counties compared with the rest of the state in terms of political, social, and economic attitudes. In September 1917 the “Soldier Boys” trained at Camp Bowie, near Fort Worth, Texas, until the War Department combined the Seventh Texas with the First Oklahoma Infantry to form the 142d Infantry Regiment of the 36th Division. In early October 1918, the 142d Infantry, including more than 600 original members of the Seventh Texas, was assigned to the French Fourth Army in the Champagne region and went into combat for the first time on October 6. Ball explores the combat experiences of those Texas soldiers in detail up through the armistice of November 11, 1918. “Ball has done a fine job to describe and analyze the types of men who served—regarding their backgrounds and economic and social status—which fits well with the important trend relating military history to social history.”—Joseph G. Dawson, editor of The Texas Military Experience
Access: Restricted to UNT Community Members. Login required if off-campus.
Date: March 15, 2013
Creator: Ball, Gregory W.
Partner: UNT Press
open access

Asleep in the Arms of God

Description: A work of creative fiction in the form of a short novel, Asleep in the Arms of God is a limited-omniscient and omniscient narrative describing the experiences of a man named Wafer Roberts, born in Jack County, Texas, in 1900. The novel spans the years from 1900 to 1925, and moves from the Keechi Valley of North Texas, to Fort Worth and then France during World War One, and back again to the Keechi Valley. The dissertation opens with a preface, which examines the form of the novel, and regional and other aspects of this particular work, especially as they relate to the postmodern concern with fragmentation and conditional identity. Wafer confronts in the novel aspects of his own questionable history, which echo the larger concern with exploitative practices including racism, patriarchy, overplanting and overgrazing, and pollution, which contribute to and climax in the postmodern fragmentation. The novel attempts to make a critique of the exploitative rage of Western civilization.
Date: December 1999
Creator: Clay, Kevin M.
Partner: UNT Libraries
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