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Determination of the potential market size and opportunities for biomass to electricity projects in China

Description: Efforts are currently underway to assess the market potential and prospects for the US private sector in biomass energy development in Yunnan Province. Among the specific objectives of the study are to: estimate the likely market size and competitiveness of biomass energy, assess the viability of US private sector ventures; assess non-economic factors (e.g., resource, environmental, social, political, institutional) that could affect the viability of biomass energy; and recommend appropriate actions to help stimulate biomass initiatives. Feasibility studies show that biomass projects in Yunnan Province are financially and technically viable. Biomass can be grown and converted to electricity at costs lower than other alternatives. These projects if implemented can ease power shortages and help to sustain the region`s economic growth. The external environmental benefits of integrated biomass projects are also potentially significant. This paper summarizes a two-step screening and rank-ordering process that is being used to identify the best candidate projects for possible US private sector investment. The process uses a set of initial screens to eliminate projects that are not technically feasible to develop. The remaining projects are then rank-ordered using a multicriteria technique.
Date: August 1, 1995
Creator: Perlack, R.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Lessons learned from existing biomass power plants

Description: This report includes summary information on 20 biomass power plants, which represent some of the leaders in the industry. In each category an effort is made to identify plants that illustrate particular points. The project experiences described capture some important lessons learned that lead in the direction of an improved biomass power industry.
Date: February 24, 2000
Creator: Wiltsee, G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Biomass power for rural development: Phase 2. Technical progress report, April 1--June 30, 1998

Description: The project undertaken by the Salix Consortium is a multi-phased, multi-partner endeavor. Phase-1 focused on initial development and testing of the technology and agreements necessary to demonstrate commercial willow production in Phase-2. The Phase-1 objectives have been successfully completed: preparing final design plans for two utility pulverized coal boilers, developing fuel supply plans for the project, obtaining power production commitments from the power companies for Phase-2, obtaining construction and environmental permits, and developing an experimental strategy for crop production and power generation improvements needed to assure commercial success. The R and D effort also addresses environmental issues pertaining to introduction of the willow energy system. Beyond those Phase-1 requirements the Consortium has already successfully demonstrated cofiring at Greenidge Station and developed the required nursery capacity for acreage scale-up. This past summer 105 acres were prepared in advance for the spring planting in 1998. Having completed the above tasks, the Consortium is well positioned to begin Phase-2. In phase-2 every aspect of willow production and power generation from willow will be demonstrated. The ultimate objective of Phase-2 is to transition the work performed under the Rural Energy for the Future project into a thriving, self-supported energy crop enterprise.
Date: November 1, 1998
Creator: Neuhauser, E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Biomass power for rural development. Technical progress report, Phase 2, July 1--September 30, 1998

Description: The project undertaken by the Salix Consortium is a multi-phased, multi-partner endeavor. Phase 1 focused on initial development and testing of the technology and forging the necessary agreements to demonstrate commercial willow production. The Phase 1 objectives have been successfully completed: preparing final design plans for two utility pulverized coal boiler for 20 MW of biopower capacity; developing fuel supply plans for the project with a goal of establishing 365 ha (900 ac) of willow; obtaining power production commitments from the power companies for Phase 2; obtaining construction and environmental permits; and developing an experimental strategy for crop production and power generation improvements needed to assure commercial success. The R and D effort also addresses environmental issues pertaining to introduction of the willow energy system. Beyond those Phase 1 requirements, the Consortium has already successfully demonstrated cofiring at Greenidge Station and has initiated development of the required nursery capacity for acreage scale-up. In Phase 2 every aspect of willow production and power generation from willow biomass will be demonstrated. The ultimate objective of Phase 2 is to transition the work performed under the Biomass Power for Rural Development project into a thriving, self-supported energy crop enterprise.
Date: January 1, 1999
Creator: Neuhauser, E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Estimating externalities of biomass fuel cycles, Report 7

Description: This report documents the analysis of the biomass fuel cycle, in which biomass is combusted to produce electricity. The major objectives of this study were: (1) to implement the methodological concepts which were developed in the Background Document (ORNL/RFF 1992) as a means of estimating the external costs and benefits of fuel cycles, and by so doing, to demonstrate their application to the biomass fuel cycle; (2) to develop, given the time and resources, a range of estimates of marginal (i.e., the additional or incremental) damages and benefits associated with selected impact-pathways from a new wood-fired power plant, using a representative benchmark technology, at two reference sites in the US; and (3) to assess the state of the information available to support energy decision making and the estimation of externalities, and by so doing, to assist in identifying gaps in knowledge and in setting future research agendas. The demonstration of methods, modeling procedures, and use of scientific information was the most important objective of this study. It provides an illustrative example for those who will, in the future, undertake studies of actual energy options and sites. As in most studies, a more comprehensive analysis could have been completed had budget constraints not been as severe. Particularly affected were the air and water transport modeling, estimation of ecological impacts, and economic valuation. However, the most important objective of the study was to demonstrate methods, as a detailed example for future studies. Thus, having severe budget constraints was appropriate from the standpoint that these studies could also face similar constraints. Consequently, an important result of this study is an indication of what can be done in such studies, rather than the specific numerical estimates themselves.
Date: January 1, 1998
Creator: Barnthouse, L.W.; Cada, G.F.; Cheng, M.-D.; Easterly, C.E.; Kroodsma, R.L.; Lee, R. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Alkali deposits found in biomass boilers: The behavior of inorganic material in biomass-fired power boilers -- Field and laboratory experiences. Volume 2

Description: This report documents the major findings of the Alkali Deposits Investigation, a collaborative effort to understand the causes of unmanageable ash deposits in biomass-fired electric power boilers. Volume 1 of this report provide an overview of the project, with selected highlights. This volume provides more detail and discussion of the data and implications. This document includes six sections. The first, the introduction, provides the motivation, context, and focus for the investigation. The remaining sections discuss fuel properties, bench-scale combustion tests, a framework for considering ash deposition processes, pilot-scale tests of biomass fuels, and field tests in commercially operating biomass power generation stations. Detailed chemical analyses of eleven biomass fuels representing a broad cross-section of commercially available fuels reveal their properties that relate to ash deposition tendencies. The fuels fall into three broad categories: (1) straws and grasses (herbaceous materials); (2) pits, shells, hulls and other agricultural byproducts of a generally ligneous nature; and (3) woods and waste fuels of commercial interest. This report presents a systematic and reasonably detailed analysis of fuel property, operating condition, and boiler design issues that dictate ash deposit formation and property development. The span of investigations from bench-top experiments to commercial operation and observations including both practical illustrations and theoretical background provide a self-consistent and reasonably robust basis to understand the qualitative nature of ash deposit formation in biomass boilers. While there remain many quantitative details to be pursued, this project encapsulates essentially all of the conceptual aspects of the issue. It provides a basis for understanding and potentially resolving the technical and environmental issues associated with ash deposition during biomass combustion. 81 refs., 124 figs., 76 tabs.
Date: March 1, 1996
Creator: Baxter, L.L.; Miles, T.R.; Miles, T.R. Jr.; Jenkins, B.M.; Dayton, D.C.; Milne, T.A. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Assessing the potential of bioenergy. Final report, October 1, 1997--September 30, 1998

Description: As electricity restructuring proceeds, traditional concepts of how energy is produced, transported, and utilized are likely to change dramatically. Marketplace, policy, and regulatory changes will shape both the domestic and global energy industry, improving opportunities for clean, low-cost energy, competitively priced fuels, and environmentally responsible power systems. Many of these benefits may be obtained by commercial deployment of advanced biomass power conversion technologies. The United BioEnergy Commercialization Association represents the US biomass power industry. Its membership includes investor-owned and public utilities, independent power producers, state and regional bioenergy, equipment manufacturers, and biomass energy developers. To carry out its mission, UBECA has been carrying out the following activities: production of informational and educational materials on biomass energy and distribution of such materials at public forums; technical and market analyses of biomass energy fuels, conversion technologies, and market issues; monitoring of issues affecting the biomass energy community; and facilitating cooperation among members to leverage the funds available for biomass commercialization activities.
Date: December 31, 1998
Creator: Kirschner, J. & Badin, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Proceedings of the Chornobyl phytoremediation and biomass energy conversion workshop

Description: Many concepts, systems, technical approaches, technologies, ideas, agreements, and disagreements were vigorously discussed during the course of the 2-day workshop. The workshop was successful in generating intensive discussions on the merits of the proposed concept that includes removal of radionuclides by plants and trees (phytoremediation) to clean up soil in the Chornobyl Exclusion Zone (CEZ), use of the resultant biomass (plants and trees) to generate electrical power, and incorporation of ash in concrete casks to be used as storage containers in a licensed repository for low-level waste. Twelve years after the Chornobyl Nuclear Power Plant (ChNPP) Unit 4 accident, which occurred on April 26, 1986, the primary 4radioactive contamination of concern is from radioactive cesium ({sup 137}Cs) and strontium ({sup 90}Sr). The {sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr were widely distributed throughout the CEZ. The attendees from Ukraine, Russia, Belarus, Denmark and the US provided information, discussed and debated the following issues considerably: distribution and characteristics of radionuclides in CEZ; efficacy of using trees and plants to extract radioactive cesium (Cs) and strontium (Sr) from contaminated soil; selection of energy conversion systems and technologies; necessary infrastructure for biomass harvesting, handling, transportation, and energy conversion; radioactive ash and emission management; occupational health and safety concerns for the personnel involved in this work; and economics. The attendees concluded that the overall concept has technical and possibly economic merits. However, many issues (technical, economic, risk) remain to be resolved before a viable commercial-scale implementation could take place.
Date: June 1, 1998
Creator: Hartley, J. & Tokarevsky, V.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The value of the benefits of U.S. biomass power

Description: Biomass power has always been used to generate power in the forest products industry, but its widespread use for supplying power to the US grid is a relatively recent phenomenon. Today independent biomass power generators supply 11 billion kWh/yr to the national electricity grid and, in the process, provide an environmentally superior disposal service for 22 million tons/yr of solid waste
Date: April 3, 2000
Creator: Morris, G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Feasibility study of wood-fired cogeneration at a Wood Products Industrial Park, Belington, WV. Phase II

Description: Customarily, electricity is generated in a utility power plant while thermal energy is generated in a heating/cooling plant; the electricity produced at the power plant is transmitted to the heating/cooling plant to power equipments. These two separate systems waste vast amounts of heat and result in individual efficiencies of about 35%. Cogeneration is the sequential production of power (electrical or mechanical) and thermal energy (process steam, hot/chilled water) from a single power source; the reject heat of one process issued as input into the subsequent process. Cogeneration increases the efficiency of these stand-alone systems by producing these two products sequentially at one location using a small additional amount of fuel, rendering the system efficiency greater than 70%. This report discusses cogeneration technologies as applied to wood fuel fired system.
Date: June 1, 1992
Creator: Vasenda, S.K. & Hassler, C.C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The economics of biomass production in the United States

Description: Biomass crops (e.g. poplar, willow, switchgrass) could become important feedstocks for power, liquid fuel, and chemical production. This paper presents estimates of the potential production of biomass in the US under a range of assumptions. Estimates of potential biomass crop yields and production costs from the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratories (ORNL) are combined with measures of land rents from USDA`s Conservation Reserve Program (CRP), to estimate a competitive supply of biomass wood and grass crops. Estimates are made for one potential biomass use--electric power production--where future costs of electricity production from competing fossil fuels set the demand price. The paper outlines the methodology used and limitations of the analysis.
Date: December 1995
Creator: Graham, R. L.; Walsh, M. E.; Lichtenberg, E.; Roningen, V. O. & Shapouri, H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The effect of location and facility demand on the marginal cost of delivered wood chips from energy crops: A case study of the state of Tennessee

Description: Cost-supply curves for delivered wood chips from short rotation woody crops were calculated for 21 regularly-spaced locations spanning the state of Tennessee. These curves were used to systematically evaluate the combined effects of location and facility demand on wood chip feedstock costs in Tennessee. The cost-supply curves were developed using BRAVO, a GIS-based decision support system which calculates marginal cost of delivering wood chips to a specific location given road network maps and maps of farmgate prices and supplies of woody chips from short rotation energy crops. Marginal costs of delivered chips varied by both facility location in the state and facility demand. Marginal costs were lowest in central Tennessee unless the facility demand was greater than 2.7 million dry Mg per year (3 million dry tons per year) in which case west Tennessee was the lowest cost region. Marginal costs rose rapidly with increasing facility demand in the mountainous eastern portion of the state. Transportation costs accounted for 18 to 29% of the delivered cost and ranged between $8 and $18/dry Mg ($7 and $16/dry ton). Reducing the expected farmer participation rate from 100% to 50% or 25% dramatically raised the marginal costs of feedstock supply in the east and central regions of the state. The analysis demonstrates the need to use geographically-specific information when projecting the potential costs and supplies of biomass feedstock.
Date: December 31, 1995
Creator: Graham, R.L.; Liu, W.; Downing, M.; Noon, C.; Daly, M. & Moore, A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

PURPA (Public Utility Regulatory Practices Act) implementation: Policy issues and choices: The Northeast Regional Biomass Program

Description: The purpose of this report is to provide some guidance in the structuring of state rules for the implementation of Public Utility Regulatory Practices Act (PURPA) of 1978. The problem posed here is how might rules be structured to allow for the development of biomass facilities which qualify, but which are not biased in favor of non-renewable resources. Such protects are likely to have different requirements necessary for their development than, for example, hydroelectric facilities. In a general comparison of the two, biomass projects will be fuel and fuel contract dependent, less capital intensive, and more likely to be dispatchable on an annual basis. In addition, biomass facilities may be cogenerators and have available to them more than one revenue stream. Biomass facilities may also be more likely than the hydros to go out of business during the term of the contract.
Date: April 9, 1986
Creator: Salgo, H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Alkali deposits found in biomass power plants: A preliminary investigation of their extent and nature. Volume 1

Description: Alkali in the ash of annual crop biomass fuels creates serious fouling and slagging in conventional boilers. Even with the use of sorbents and other additives, power plants can only fire limited amounts of these fuels in combination with wood. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), US Department of Energy, and the biomass power industry carried out eight full-scale firing tests and several laboratory experiments to study the nature and occurrence of deposits with the goal of increasing the quantities of these biofuels that can be used. This report describes the results of the laboratory and power plant tests that included: tracking and analyzing fuels and deposits by various methods; recording operating conditions; and extensive laboratory testing. The paper describes the occurrence of deposits, fuel and deposit analyses, boiler design and operation, fouling and slagging indicators, and recommendations. 37 refs., 41 figs., 17 tabs.
Date: April 15, 1995
Creator: Miles, T.R.; Miles, T.R. Jr.; Baxter, L.L.; Bryers, R.W.; Jenkins, B.M. & Oden, L.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Second biomass conference of the Americas: Energy, environment, agriculture, and industry. Proceedings

Description: This volume provides the proceedings for the Second Biomass Conference of the Americas: Energy, Environment, Agriculture, and Industry which was held August 21-24, 1995. The volume contains copies of full papers as provided by the researchers. Individual papers were separately indexed and abstracted for the database.
Date: January 1, 1995
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Advanced system demonstration for utilization of biomass as an energy source

Description: The results of the study investigations confirm the feasibility of collecting 1000 oven dry tons of biomass per day to fuel a 510,000 lb/hr boiler operating in a congeneration mode and producing steam and electricity. This study was based on the supply of a significant portion of the facility's biomass fuel by tree harvesting and collection operations within a 50 mile radius of the plant site. These operations, including transporting biomass to the conversion plant, would pose no threat to the environment if good forestry practice is carefully maintained. Other environmental factors relating to air and water discharges from the conversion plant pose no significant technological problems in complying with federal, state, and local regulations at a cost that is competitive with similar costs associated with fossil fueled facilities.
Date: October 1, 1980
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Identification of environmental issues: Hybrid wood-geothermal power plant, Wendel-Amedee KGRA, Lassen County, California: First phase report

Description: The development of a 55 MWe power plant in Lassen County, California, has been proposed. The proposed power plant is unique in that it will utilize goethermal heat and wood fuel to generate electrical power. This report identifies environmental issues and constraints which may impact the proposed hybrid wood-geothermal power plant. (ACR)
Date: August 14, 1981
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Honey Lake Hybrid Power Plant Project. Volume 1. Executive summary

Description: A technical and economic feasibility study of the engineering aspects of a hybrid wood-fired geothermal electrical generating plant is presented. The proposed plant location is in Lassen County, California, near the Wendel Amedee Known Geothermal Resource Area. This power plant uses moderate temperature geothermal fluid to augment the heat supplied from a wood waste fired boiler. This report defines major plant systems for implementation into the plant conceptual design and provides sufficient design information for development of budgetary cost estimates. Emphasis is placed on incorporation of geothermal heat into the power generation process. Plant systems are designed and selected based on economic justification and on proven performance. The culminating economic analysis provides the financial information to establish the incentives for construction of the plant. The study concludes that geothermal energy and energy from wood can be combined in a power generating plant to yield attractive project economics.
Date: March 1, 1982
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Assessment of potential wood supply for intermediate scale thermoconversion facilities, Tasks I, II, III

Description: The Department of Energy's Biomass Thermochemical Conversion Program has been concerned with the potential of wood biomass to contribute to the Nation's energy supply. One of the factors inhibiting the selection of wood biomass for energy by non-forest industries, especially by those requiring large quantities (500 to 2000 green tons per day), is concern with adequate fuel supply in terms of both a supply system and an adequate resource base. With respect to the latter, this report looks at the gross resource base as has been historically reported and also examines factors other than traditional product removals that could reduce to some degree the amount of resource that is available. The study also examined the conversion of a New England utility from coal to wood chips.
Date: November 1, 1985
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Biomass power industry: Assessment of key players and approaches for DOE and industry interaction

Description: A review team established by the Department of Energy conducted an assessment of the US biomass power industry. The review team visited with more than 50 organizations representing all sectors of the biomass power industry including utilities, independent power producers, component manufacturers, engineering and construction contractors, agricultural organizations, industrial users, and regulatory organizations. DOE solicited industry input for the development of the Biomass Power Division`s Five Year Plan. DOE believed there was a critical need to obtain industry`s insight and working knowledge to develop the near- and long-term plans of the program. At the heart of this objective was the desire to identify near-term initiatives that the program could pursue to help accelerate the further development of biomass power projects.
Date: January 1, 1994
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Biomass power industry: Assessment of key players and approaches for DOE and industry interaction. Final report

Description: This report reviews the status of the US biomass power industry. The topics of the report include current fuels and the problems associated with procuring, transporting, preparing and burning them, competition from natural gas projects because of the current depressed natural gas prices, need for incentives for biomass fueled projects, economics, market potential and expansion of US firms overseas.
Date: July 1, 1993
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

First phase report on identification of environmental issues hybrid wood-geothermal power plant. Wendel-Amedee KGRA, Lassen County, California

Description: The following disciplines are covered: air resources; land use, vegetation, and wildlife, geotechnical environment; surface water, ground water, and waste disposal; cultural resources; health, industrial hygiene and noise; and socio-economics. The following are presented for each discipline: general comments; regulations, ordinances, statutes, and guidelines; bibliography with abstracts; and sensitive environmental issues. (MHR)
Date: August 14, 1981
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Second phase report on identification of environmental issues hybrid wood-geothermal power plant. Wendel-Amedee KGRA, Lassen County, California

Description: The permitting process is reviewed. The environmental data requirements are presented for: air resources; vegetation and wildlife; geotechnical environment; surface waters; cultural resources; public health, industrial hygiene, and noise; land use and socio-economic factors; and scheduling and budgets. (MHR)
Date: August 14, 1981
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department