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Undulators on a 6-GeV ring general considerations

Description: In, designing undulators on a 6-GeV storage ring the primary consideration will be the power that such devices will deliver. The beam line design should be capable of handling large powers that such undulators will deliver. Specifically, in a beam line in the front end we have masks (fixed and movable) followed by various optical components. Many thermal designs are now being developed to improve on the capability of various components to handle a greater beat load than ever been possible before. For example, designs for rotating optics and liquid metal cooled optics are actively pursued in the MST division.
Date: April 16, 1985
Creator: Shenoy, G.K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Cornell undulator/summary of discussions

Description: Based on an earlier statement made by CESR (during the meeting in March 1986 at Cornell) that the ring energy can be 6-GeV and the minimum gap can be 0.9 cm, we performed design calculations for the Cornell undulator. These are presented and briefly summaried in this report.
Date: August 5, 1986
Creator: Shenoy, G. & Viccaro, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A constant gradient planar accelerating structure for linac use

Description: Planar accelerating millimeter-wave structures have been studied during the last few years at Argonne National Laboratory in collaboration with Technical University of Berlin. The cavity structures are intended to be manufactured by using x-ray lithography microfabrication technology. A complete structure consists of two identical planar half structures put together face-to-face. Since microfabrication technology can make a since-depth indentation on a planar substrate, realizing the constant impedance structure was possible but a constant gradient structure was difficult; changing the group velocity along the structure while maintaining the gap and the depth of the indentation constant was difficult. A constant gradient structure has been devised by introducing a cut between the adjacent cavity cells along the beam axis of each half structure. The width of the cut is varied along the longitudinal axis of the structure to have proper coupling between the cells. The result of the computer simulation on such structures is shown.
Date: July 1, 1995
Creator: Kang, Y.W.; Matthews, P.J. & Kustom, R.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Alignment of the VISA Undulator

Description: The Visible-Infrared SASE Amplifier (VISA) undulator consists of four 99cm long segments. Each undulator segment is set up on a pulsed-wire bench, to characterize the magnetic properties and to locate the magnetic axis of the FODO array. Subsequently, the location of the magnetic axis, as defined by the wire, is referenced to tooling balls on each magnet segment by means of a straightness interferometer. After installation in the vacuum chamber, the four magnet segments are aligned with respect to themselves and globally to the beam line reference laser. A specially designed alignment fixture is used to mount one straightness interferometer each in the horizontal and vertical plane of the beam. The goal of these procedures is to keep the combined rms trajectory error, due to magnetic and alignment errors, to 50{micro}m.
Date: April 15, 1999
Creator: Ruland, Robert
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Long wavelength end-effect undulator radiation (Transition Undulator Radiation)

Description: As first pointed out by K.-J. Kim, undulator radiation contains a broad-band component in the long wavelength region. This radiation is due to the change in longitudinal velocity of an electron upon entering and leaving an undulator. The radiation pattern is a hollow cone, peaked in the forward direction, with an opening angle of approximately 1/{gamma}, with a spectrum covering a wide range, including the infra-red and the visible. The radiation is radially polarized, analogous to transition radiation, and exhibits interference effects between the entrance and exit ends of the undulator, similar to the interference effects observed for transition radiation from a thin slab of material. A straightforward application of formulas from Jackson ({ital Classical Electrodynamics}) results in a closed form exact expression for the low frequency limit of this novel radiation effect, Transition Undulator Radiation or TUR. 3 refs., 3 figs.
Date: January 29, 1996
Creator: Kincaid, B.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Global beta-beating compensation of the ALS W16 wiggler

Description: The W16 wiggler is the first wiggler and highest field insertion device to be installed in the ALS storage ring. When the gaps of the W16 wiggler are closed, the vertical tune increases by 0.065 and the vertical beta function is distorted by up to {+-}37%. There are 48 quadrupoles in the ring whose fields can be adjusted individually to restore the tunes and partially compensate the beta-beating. In order to adjust the quadrupole field strengths to accurately compensate the focusing, it is necessary to have a method to precisely determine the beta-beating. In this paper we compare measurements of the induced beta-beating using two methods: measuring the tune dependence on quadrupole field strength and fitting a lattice model with measured response matrices. The fitted model also allows us to predict quadrupole field strengths that will best compensate the beta beating. These quadrupole field strengths are then applied and the resultant beta-beating is measured.
Date: May 1, 1997
Creator: Robin, D.; Decking, W. & Nishimura, H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Reference Undulator Measurement Results

Description: The LCLS reference undulator has been measured 22 times during the course of undulator tuning. These measurements provide estimates of various statistical errors. This note gives a summary of the reference undulator measurements and it provides estimates of the undulator tuning errors. We measured the reference undulator many times during the tuning of the LCLS undulators. These data sets give estimates of the random errors in the tuned undulators. The measured trajectories in the reference undulator are stable and straight to within {+-}2 {micro}m. Changes in the phase errors are less than {+-}2 deg between data sets. The phase advance in the cell varies by less than {+-}2 deg between data sets. The rms variation between data sets of the first integral of B{sub x} is 9.98 {micro}Tm, and the rms variation of the second integral of B{sub x} is 17.4 {micro}Tm{sup 2}. The rms variation of the first integral of B{sub y} is 6.65 {micro}Tm, and the rms variation of the second integral of B{sub y} is 12.3 {micro}Tm{sup 2}. The rms variation of the x-position of the fiducialized beam axis is 35 {micro}m in the final production run This corresponds to an rms uncertainty in the K value of {Delta}K/K = 2.7 x 10{sup -5}. The rms variation of the y-position of the fiducialized beam axis is 4 {micro}m in the final production run.
Date: August 18, 2011
Creator: Wolf, Zachary; Levashov, Yurii; /SLAC & ,
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

INTRA-UNDULATOR MEASUREMENTS AT VISA FEL.

Description: We describe a diagnostics system developed, to measure exponential gain properties and the electron beam dynamics inside the strong focusing 4-m long undulator for the VISA (Visible to Infrared SASE Amplifier) FEL. The technical challenges included working inside the small undulator gap, optimizing the electron beam diagnostics in the high background environment of the spontaneous undulator radiation, multiplexing and transporting the photon beam. Initial results are discussed.
Date: August 13, 2000
Creator: MUROKH,A.; FRIGOLA,P.; AL, ET; JOHNSON,E.; WANG,X.J. & YAKIMENKO,V.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

INTRA-UNDULATOR MEASUREMENTS AT VISA FEL.

Description: We describe a diagnostics system developed, to measure exponential gain properties and the electron beam dynamics inside the strong focusing 4-m long undulator for the VISA (Visible to Infrared SASE Amplifier) FEL. The technical challenges included working inside the small undulator gap, optimizing the electron beam diagnostics in the high background environment of the spontaneous undulator radiation, multiplexing and transporting the photon beam. Initial results are discussed.
Date: August 13, 2000
Creator: MUROKH,A.; FRIGOLA,P.; AL, ET; JOHNSON,E.; WANG,X.J. & YAKIMENKO,V.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

MECHANICAL DESIGN OF NSLS MINI - GAP UNDULATOR (MGU)

Description: The mechanical design considerations are discussed with respect to the currently installed X-13 and future X-29 MGU. Comparisons to the previous 2 generations of variable small-gap undulator evolution in the NSLS X-ray ring are made and design improvements noted. The design requirements and mechanical difficulties for holding, positioning and driving the magnetic arrays are explored. Structural, thermal and electrical considerations which influenced the design are then analyzed. The mechanical performance of the MGU currently installed at X-13 is examined and future installations and enhancements are presented.
Date: September 5, 2002
Creator: LYNCH,D. & RAKOWSKY,G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Scientific potential and design considerations for an undulator beam line on Aladdin storage ring

Description: The unique features of undulator radiation, i.e., high photon flux and brightness, partial coherence, small beam divergence, spectral tunability, etc., mandate that undulators be included in the future plans for Aladdin. This will make it possible to perform the next generation of experiments in photon-stimulated spectroscopies. A team of scientists (see Appendix) has now been assembled to build an insertion device (ID) and the associated beam line at Aladdin. In considering the specifications for the ID, it was assumed that the ID beamline will be an SRC user facility. Consequently, design parameters were chosen with the intent of maximizing experimental flexibility consistent with a conservative design approach. A tunable {open_quotes}clamshell{close_quotes} undulator device was Chosen with a first harmonic tunable from 35 to 110 eV to operate on a 1 GeV storage ring. Higher harmonics will be utilized for experiments needing higher photon energies.
Date: April 8, 1985
Creator: Arko, A.J.; Bader, S.D.; Dehmer, J.L. & Kim, S.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

LCLS Undulator Quadrupole Fiducialization Plan

Description: This note presents the fiducialization plan for the LCLS undulator quadrupoles. The note begins by summarizing the requirements for the fiducialization. A discussion of the measurement equipment is presented, followed by the methods used to perform the fiducialization and check the results. This is followed by the detailed fiducialization plan in which each step is enumerated. Finally, the measurement results and data storage formats are presented. The LCLS is made up of 33 assemblies consisting of an undulator, quadrupole, beam finder wire, and other components mounted on a girder. The components must be mounted in such a way that the beam passes down the axis of each component. In this note, we describe how the ideal beam axis is related to tooling balls on the quadrupole. This step, called fiducialization, is necessary because the ideal beam axis is determined magnetically, whereas tangible objects must be used to locate the quadrupole. The note begins with the list of fiducialization requirements. The laboratory in which the work will be performed and the relevant equipment is then briefly described. This is followed by a discussion of the methods used to perform the fiducialization and the methods used to check the results. A detailed fiducialization plan is presented in which all the steps of fiducialization are enumerated. A discussion of the resulting data files and directory structure concludes the note.
Date: November 24, 2010
Creator: Wolf, Zachary; Levashov, Michael; Lundahl, Eric; Reese, Ed; LeCocq, Catherine; Ruland, Robert et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Undulator Changes Due to Temperature Excursions

Description: The temperature of the LCLS undulators has not been controlled during storage. The effects of the temperature excursions are documented in this note. After a number of LCLS undulators were tuned, fiducialized, and placed in storage anticipating their use, a test was made to ensure that their properties had not changed. The test revealed, however, that indeed the undulators had changed. Detailed study of this problem followed. We now believe that the gap of the undulators changes permanently when the undulators go through temperature excursions. We have tested the other possible cause, transportation, and do not see gap changes. In this note, we document how the undulators have changed since they were originally tuned. The undulators were tuned and fiducialized in the Magnetic Measurement Facility (MMF). Afterward, many of them (approximately 18) were taken to building 750 for storage during summer and fall 2007. Building 750 had no temperature control. The undulator temperatures went from 20 C, used for tuning, down to approximately 11 C during the winter. In January 2008, three of the undulators were brought back to the MMF for a check. All three undulators showed similar changes. Trajectories, phases, and most undulator properties stayed the same, but the fiducialization (beam axis position relative to tooling balls on the undulator) had changed. Further investigation showed that the undulator gap was altered in a periodic way along the magnetic axis with a net average gap change causing the fiducialization change. A new storage location in building 33 was found and future undulators were placed there. A failure in the temperature control, however, caused the undulators to get too hot. Again the gap changed, but with a different periodic pattern. This note documents the measured changes in the undulators. In particular, it shows the detailed history of undulator 39 which ...
Date: November 17, 2010
Creator: Wolf, Zachary; Levashov, Yurii & Reese, Ed
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Results of design calculations for the modulator of the crossed field undulator device

Description: The modulator is a five pole wiggler with a fixed 5 cm gap. In the current design, the modulator is oriented so that the magnetic field in the device is parallel to the field in one of the undulators. The two end poles have no coil and are only half as thick as the inner poles. The end poles serve as field clamps that reduce the stray field of the modulator and the sextupole coefficient of the field integral. The center pole and the two side poles can be energized with coils. As long as the permeability is large enough within the steel the current in the center coil should be twice the current in a side coil to avoid steering the electron beam. Therefore, if the center coil has twice as many turns as the side coil, the magnet can be driven by one power supply.
Date: August 1, 1990
Creator: Sovay, R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Recent advances in insertion devices

Description: Demand for more and better insertion devices (IDs) at new third-generation synchrotron radiation facilities has led to significant advances in ID technology at different laboratories around the world. In this overview of this progress, focus is on those results that apply to IDs in general rather than one specific ID or laboratory. The advances fall into two general categories: those that reduce the net effect that the ID has on the particle beam, and those that enhance the quality of the emitted light spectrum. The need for these advances, factors that are most important inaachieving them, and the current state of the art are discussed.
Date: December 31, 1995
Creator: Gluskin, E. & Moog, E.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Procurement history of the hybrid undulator for the U-5 Beam Line at the National Synchrotron Light Source

Description: As part of a national multi-institutional Materials Research Group (MRG), Argonne National Laboratory had the responsibility, under a prime contract with the U.S. Department of Energy, of obtaining a Permanent Magnet Hybrid undulator to be used on the U5 Beam Line on the VUV Ring at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). The procurement involved determining the technical specifications of the device as well as developing an effective procedure for evaluation of the proposals. The conceptual design of the magnetic structure including all pertinent magnetic field properties was developed before the actual procurement process was initiated. In addition, complete calculations of the expected spectral properties of the undulator were performed which included the emittance properties of the VUV ring. The results from both analysis were essential in determining the expected performance of the device and the final choice of operating parameters.
Date: May 1, 1989
Creator: James, D.C.; Bader, S.D. & Viccaro, P.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Undulator tunability and ring-energy

Description: An Undulator has two properties which make it an extremely attractive source of electromagnetic radiation. The first is that the radiation is concentrated in a number of narrow energy bands known as harmonics of the device. The second characteristic is that under favorable operating conditions, the energy of these harmonics can be shifted or {open_quotes}tuned{close_quotes} over an energy interval which can be as large as two or three times the value of the lowest energy harmonic. Both the photon energy of an undulator as well as its tunability are determined by the period, {lambda}, of the device, the magnetic gap, G (which is larger than the minimum aperture required for injection and operation of the storage ring), and the storage ring energy, E{sub R}. Given the photon energy, E{sub p}, the above parameters ultimately define the limits of operation or tunability of the undulator.
Date: September 1, 1996
Creator: Viccaro, P.J. & Shenoy, G.K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department