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Wetting of a Chemically Heterogeneous Surface

Description: Theories for inhomogeneous fluids have focused in recent years on wetting, capillary conden- sation, and solvation forces for model systems where the surface(s) is(are) smooth homogeneous parallel plates, cylinders, or spherical drops. Unfortunately natural systems are more likely to be hetaogeneous both in surt%ce shape and surface chemistry. In this paper we discuss the conse- quences of chemical heterogeneity on wetting. Specifically, a 2-dimensional implementation of a nonlocal density functional theory is solved for a striped surface model. Both the strength and range of the heterogeneity are varied. Contact angles are calculated, and phase transitions (both the wetting transition and a local layering transition) are located. The wetting properties of the surface ase shown to be strongly dependent on the nature of the surface heterogeneity. In addition highly ordered nanoscopic phases are found, and the operational limits for formation of ordered or crystalline phases of nanoscopic extent are discussed.
Date: November 20, 1998
Creator: Frink, L.J.D. & Salinger, A.G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Task 6.7.3 - Interfacial Mass Transport Effects in Composite Materials

Description: A series of TiNX and Ti(N,O)X films formed from a TiC, N2, H2, and (N2 + 02 ) gas mixture was deposited on aluminum ceramics at 1073 K for 5 hr at atmospheric pressure, according to the procedure described in Dekker et al. These conditions were selected because they offer a reasonable deposition rate and low chlorine content in films. The TiNX films, with two different nonstoichiometries controlled by the ratio of to H2 and two Ti(N,O)X films with different nitrogen and oxygen content were prepared. The N2 and H2 gases were first purified in alkaline pyrogallol and dried over silica gel and further over a copper and palladium catalyst. TiCld concentration in flowing N2 and H2 (70/30) corresponded to its vapor pressure over liquid at 300 K. Film thickness was determined using a multiple interferometer. All of the films obtained were thicker than 1000 nm. Phase analysis and interatomic distances were determined by x-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) at room temperature.
Date: August 1, 1997
Creator: Nowok, Jan W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Detachment of Liquid-Water Droplets from Gas-Diffusion Layers

Description: A critical issue for optimal water management in proton-exchange-membrane fuel cells at lower temperatures is the removal of liquid water from the cell. This pathway is intimately linked with the phenomena of liquid-water droplet removal from surface of the gas-diffusion layer and into the flow channel. Thus, a good understanding of liquid-water transport and droplet growth and detachment from the gas-diffusion layer is critical. In this study, liquid-water droplet growth and detachment on the gas-diffusion layer surfaces are investigated experimentally to improve the understating of water transport through and removal from gas-diffusion layers. An experiment using a sliding-angle measurement is designed and used to quantify and directly measure the adhesion force for liquid-water droplets, and to understand the droplets? growth and detachment from the gas-diffusion layers.
Date: July 1, 2011
Creator: Das, Prodip K.; Grippin, Adam & Weber, Adam Z.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The wetting behavior of NiAl and NiPtAl on polycrystalline alumina

Description: In order to understand the beneficial effect of Pt on the adherence of thermally grown alumina scales, sessile drop experiments were performed to study the wetting of poly-crystalline alumina by nickel-aluminum alloys with or without platinum addition where the amount of Pt ranged from 2.4 to 10 at.%. Subsequent interfacial structure was evaluated using atomic force microscopy. Platinum addition enhances the wettability of NiAl alloys on alumina, reduces the oxide/alloy interface energy and increases the interfacial mass transport rates.
Date: July 1, 2007
Creator: Saiz, Eduardo; Gauffier, Antoine; Saiz, Eduardo; Tomsia, Antoni P. & Hou, Peggy Y.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Exploitation and Optimization of Reservoir Performance in Hunton Formation, Oklahoma

Description: West Carney field--one of the newest fields discovered in Oklahoma--exhibits many unique production characteristics. These characteristics include: (1) decreasing water-oil ratio; (2) decreasing gas-oil ratio followed by an increase; (3) poor prediction capability of the reserves based on the log data; and (4) low geological connectivity but high hydrodynamic connectivity. The purpose of this investigation is to understand the principal mechanisms affecting the production, and propose methods by which we can extend the phenomenon to other fields with similar characteristics. In our experimental investigation section, we continue to describe the use of surfactant to alter the wettability of the rock. By altering the wettability, we may be able to recover additional oil through imbibition and gravity drainage process.
Date: June 30, 2006
Creator: Kelkar, Mohan
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Use of organic solderability preservatives on solderability retention of copper after accelerated aging

Description: Organic solderability preservatives (OSP`s) have been used by the electronics industry for some time to maintain the solderability of circuit boards and components. Since solderability affects both manufacturing efficiency and product reliability, there is significant interest in maintaining good solder wettability. There is often a considerable time interval between the initial fabrication of a circuit board or component and its use at the assembly level. Parts are often stored under a variety of conditions, in many cases not well controlled. Solder wettability can deteriorate during storage, especially in harsh environments. This paper describes the ongoing efforts at Sandia National Laboratories to quantify solder watability on bare and aged copper surfaces. Benzotriazole and imidazole were applied to electronic grade copper to retard aging effects on solderability. The coupons were introduced into Sandia`s Facility for Atmospheric Corrosion Testing (FACT) to simulate aging in a typical indoor industrial environment. H{sub 2}S, NO{sub 2} and Cl{sub 2} mixed gas was introduced into the test cell and maintained at 35{degrees}C and 70% relative humidity for test periods of one day to two weeks. The OSP`s generally performed better than bare Cu, although solderability diminished with increasing exposure times.
Date: February 1, 1997
Creator: Hernandez, C.L.; Sorensen, N.R. & Lucero, S.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Evaluation of Reservoir Wettability and its Effect on Oil Recovery.

Description: We report on the first year of the project, `Evaluation of Reservoir Wettability and its Effect on Oil Recovery.` The objectives of this five-year project are (1) to achieve improved understanding of the surface and interfacial properties of crude oils and their interactions with mineral surfaces, (2) to apply the results of surface studies to improve predictions of oil production from laboratory measurements, and (3) to use the results of this research to recommend ways to improve oil recovery by waterflooding. During the first year of this project we have focused on understanding the interactions between crude oils and mineral surfaces that establish wetting in porous media. As background, mixed-wetting and our current understanding of the influence of stable and unstable brine films are reviewed. The components that are likely to adsorb and alter wetting are divided into two groups: those containing polar heteroatoms, especially organic acids and bases; and the asphaltenes, large molecules that aggregate in solution and precipitate upon addition of n-pentane and similar agents. Finally, the test procedures used to assess the extent of wetting alteration-tests of adhesion and adsorption on smooth surfaces and spontaneous imbibition into porous media are introduced. In Part 1, we report on studies aimed at characterizing both the acid/base and asphaltene components. Standard acid and base number procedures were modified and 22 crude oil samples were tested. Our approach to characterizing the asphaltenes is to focus on their solvent environment. We quantify solvent properties by refractive index measurements and report the onset of asphaltene precipitation at ambient conditions for nine oil samples. Four distinct categories of interaction mechanisms have been identified that can be demonstrated to occur when crude oils contact solid surfaces: polar interactions can occur on dry surfaces, surface precipitation is important if the oil is a poor solvent for ...
Date: January 15, 1998
Creator: Buckley, J.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Evaluation of Reservoir Wettability and its Effect on Oil Recovery

Description: This project has three main goals. The first is to achieve improved understanding of the surface and interfacial properties of crude oils and their interactions with mineral surfaces. The second goal is to apply the results of surface studies to improved predictions of oil production in laboratory experiments. Finally, we aim to use the results of this research to recommend ways to improve oil recovery by waterflooding. In order to achieve these goals, the mechanisms of wetting alteration must be explained. We propose a methodology for studying those mechanisms on mineral surfaces, then applying the results to prediction and observation of wetting alteration in porous media. Improved understanding of the underlying mechanisms will show when and how wettability in the reservoir can be altered and under what circumstances that alteration would be beneficial in terms of increased production of oil.
Date: November 9, 1999
Creator: Buckley, Jill S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Laser Surface Modification on Az31b Mg Alloy for Bio-wettability

Description: Laser surface modification of AZ31B Magnesium alloy changes surface composition and roughness to provide improved surface bio-wettability. Laser processing resulted in phase transformation and grain refinement due to rapid quenching effect. Furthermore, instantaneous heating and vaporization resulted in removal of material, leading the textured surface generation. A study was conducted on a continuum-wave diode-pumped ytterbium laser to create multiple tracks for determining the resulting bio-wettability. Five different laser input powers were processed on Mg alloy, and then examined by XRD, SEM, optical profilometer, and contact angle measurement. A finite element based heat transfer model was developed using COMSOL multi-physics package to predict the temperature evolution during laser processing. The thermal histories predicted by the model are used to evaluate the cooling rates and solidification rate and the associated changes in the microstructure. The surface energy of laser surface modification samples can be calculated by measuring the contact angle with 3 different standard liquid (D.I water, Formamide, and 1-Bromonaphthalen). The bio-wettability of the laser surface modification samples can be conducted by simulated body fluid contact angle measurement. The results of SEM, 3D morphology, XRD, and contact angle measurement show that the grain size and roughness play role for wetting behavior of laser processing Mg samples. Surface with low roughness and large grain size performs as hydrophilicity. On the contrast, surface with high roughness and small grain size performs as hydrophobicity.
Date: December 2013
Creator: Ho, YeeHsien
Partner: UNT Libraries

Evaluation of Reservoir Wettability and its Effect on Oil Recovery

Description: The objective of this five-year project are: (1) to achieve improved understanding of the surface and interfacial properties of crude oils and their interactions with mineral surfaces, (2) to apply the results of surface studies to improve predictions of oil production from laboratory measurements, and (3) to use the results of this research to recommend ways to improve oil recovery by waterflooding. During the second year of this project we have tested the generality of the proposed mechanisms by which crude oil components can alter wetting. Using these mechanisms, we have begun a program of characterizing crude oils with respect to their wettability altering potential. Wettability assessment has been improved by replacing glass with mica as a standard surface material and crude oils have been used to alter wetting in simple square glass capillary tubes in which the subsequent imbibition of water can be followed visually.
Date: July 1, 1999
Creator: Buckley, Jill S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Characterization of Mixed Wettability at Different Scales and Its Impact on Oil Recovery Efficiency

Description: The objectives of the this research project were to: (1) Quantify the pore scale mechanisms that determine the wettability state of a reservoir; (2) Study the effect of crude oil, brine and mineral compositions in the establishment of mixed wet states; (3) Clarify the effect of mixed-wettability on oil displacement efficiency in waterfloods; and (4) Develop a new tracer technique to measure wettability, fluid distributions, residual saturations and relative permeabilities.
Date: September 1, 2003
Creator: Sharma, Mukul M. & Hirasaki, George J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

WETTABILITY AND PREDICTION OF OIL RECOVERY FROM RESERVOIRS DEVELOPED WITH MODERN DRILLING AND COMPLETION FLUIDS

Description: This first semiannual report covers efforts to select the materials that will be used in this project. Discussions of crude oils, rocks, smooth mineral surfaces, and drilling mud additives are included in this report.
Date: June 1, 2002
Creator: Buckley, Jill S. & Morrow, Norman r.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Characterization of Mixed Wettablility at Different Scales and Its Impact on Oil Recovery Efficiency

Description: The objectives of the this research project were to: (1) Quantify the pore scale mechanisms that determine the wettability state of a reservoir; (2) Study the effect of crude oil, brine and mineral compositions in the establishment of mixed wet states; (3) Clarify the effect of mixed-wettability on oil displacement efficiency in waterfloods; and (4) Develop a new tracer technique to measure wettability, fluid distributions, residual saturations and relative permeabilities.
Date: August 31, 2003
Creator: Sharma, Mukul M. & Hirasaki, George J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Multiphase Flow in Complex Fracture Apertures under a Wide Range of Flow Conditions

Description: A better understanding of multiphase flow through fractures requires knowledge of the detailed physics of interfacial flows at the microscopic pore scale. The objective of our project was to develop tools for the simulation of such phenomena. Complementary work was performed by a group led by Dr.~Paul Meakin of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. Our focus was on the lattice-Boltzmann (LB) method. In particular, we studied both the statics and dynamics of contact lines where two fluids (wetting and non-wetting) meet solid boundaries. Previous work had noted deficiencies in the way LB methods simulate such interfaces. Our work resulted in significant algorithmic improvements that alleviated these deficiencies. As a result, we were able to study in detail the behavior of the dynamic contact angle in flow through capillary tubes. Our simulations revealed that our LB method reproduces the correct scaling of the dynamic contact angle with respect to velocity, viscosity, and surface tension, without specification of an artificial slip length. Further study allowed us to identify the microscopic origin of the dynamic contact angle in LB methods. These results serve to delineate the range of applicability of multiphase LB methods to flows through complex geometries.
Date: December 12, 2006
Creator: Rothman, Daniel H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

WETTABILITY AND PREDICTION OF OIL RECOVERY FROM RESERVOIRS DEVELOPED WITH MODERN DRILLING AND COMPLETION FLUIDS

Description: The objectives of this project are: (1) to improve understanding of the wettability alteration of mixed-wet rocks that results from contact with the components of synthetic oil-based drilling and completion fluids formulated to meet the needs of arctic drilling; (2) to investigate cleaning methods to reverse the wettability alteration of mixed-wet cores caused by contact with these SBM components; and (3) to develop new approaches to restoration of wetting that will permit the use of cores drilled with SBM formulations for valid studies of reservoir properties.
Date: January 1, 2006
Creator: Buckley, Jill S. & Morrow, Norman R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Letter Report for Characterization of Biochar

Description: On 27 November 2012, a bulk biochar sample was received for characterization of selected physical and chemical properties. The main purpose of the characterization was to help determine the degree to which biochar would be suitable as a soil amendment to aid in growth of plants. Towards this end, analyses to determine specific surface, pH, cation-exchange capacity, water retention, and wettability (i.e. surface tension) were conducted. A second objective was to determine how uniform these properties were in the sample. Towards this end, the sample was separated into fractions based on initial particle size and on whether the material was from the external surface or the internal portion of the particle. Based on the results, the biochar has significant liming potentials, significant cation-retention capacities, and highly variable plant-available moisture retention properties that, under the most favorable circumstances, could be helpful to plants. As a consequence, it would be quite suitable for addition to acidic soils and should enhance the fertility of those soils.
Date: April 9, 2013
Creator: Amonette, James E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Modeling Wettability Alteration using Chemical EOR Processes in Naturally Fractured Reservoirs

Description: The objective of our search is to develop a mechanistic simulation tool by adapting UTCHEM to model the wettability alteration in both conventional and naturally fractured reservoirs. This will be a unique simulator that can model surfactant floods in naturally fractured reservoir with coupling of wettability effects on relative permeabilities, capillary pressure, and capillary desaturation curves. The capability of wettability alteration will help us and others to better understand and predict the oil recovery mechanisms as a function of wettability in naturally fractured reservoirs. The lack of a reliable simulator for wettability alteration means that either the concept that has already been proven to be effective in the laboratory scale may never be applied commercially to increase oil production or the process must be tested in the field by trial and error and at large expense in time and money. The objective of Task 1 is to perform a literature survey to compile published data on relative permeability, capillary pressure, dispersion, interfacial tension, and capillary desaturation curve as a function of wettability to aid in the development of petrophysical property models as a function of wettability. The new models and correlations will be tested against published data. The models will then be implemented in the compositional chemical flooding reservoir simulator, UTCHEM. The objective of Task 2 is to understand the mechanisms and develop a correlation for the degree of wettability alteration based on published data. The objective of Task 3 is to validate the models and implementation against published data and to perform 3-D field-scale simulations to evaluate the impact of uncertainties in the fracture and matrix properties on surfactant alkaline and hot water floods.
Date: September 30, 2007
Creator: Delshad, Mojdeh; Pope, Gary A. & Sepehrnoori, Kamy
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Integrated, Multi-Scale Characterization of Imbibition and Wettability Phenomena Using Magnetic Resonance and Wide-Band Dielectric Measurements

Description: The petrophysical properties of rocks, particularly their relative permeability and wettability, strongly influence the efficiency and the time-scale of all hydrocarbon recovery processes. However, the quantitative relationships needed to account for the influence of wettability and pore structure on multi-phase flow are not yet available, largely due to the complexity of the phenomena controlling wettability and the difficulty of characterizing rock properties at the relevant length scales. This project brings together several advanced technologies to characterize pore structure and wettability. Grain-scale models are developed that help to better interpret the electric and dielectric response of rocks. These studies allow the computation of realistic configurations of two immiscible fluids as a function of wettability and geologic characteristics. These fluid configurations form a basis for predicting and explaining macroscopic behavior, including the relationship between relative permeability, wettability and laboratory and wireline log measurements of NMR and dielectric response. Dielectric and NMR measurements have been made show that the response of the rocks depends on the wetting and flow properties of the rock. The theoretical models can be used for a better interpretation and inversion of standard well logs to obtain accurate and reliable estimates of fluid saturation and of their producibility. The ultimate benefit of this combined theoretical/empirical approach for reservoir characterization is that rather than reproducing the behavior of any particular sample or set of samples, it can explain and predict trends in behavior that can be applied at a range of length scales, including correlation with wireline logs, seismic, and geologic units and strata. This approach can substantially enhance wireline log interpretation for reservoir characterization and provide better descriptions, at several scales, of crucial reservoir flow properties that govern oil recovery.
Date: September 30, 2007
Creator: Sharma, Mukul M.; Bryant, Steven L.; Torres-Verdin, Carlos & Hirasaki, George
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Water growth on metals and oxides: binding, dissociation and role of hydroxyl groups

Description: The authors discuss the role of the presence of dangling H bonds from water or from surface hydroxyl species on the wetting behavior of surfaces. Using Scanning Tunneling and Atomic Force Microscopies, and Photoelectron Spectroscopy, they have examined a variety of surfaces, including mica, oxides, and pure metals. They find that in all cases, the availability of free, dangling H-bonds at the surface is crucial for the subsequent growth of wetting water films. In the case of mica electrostatic forces and H-bonding to surface O atoms determine the water orientation in the first layer and also in subsequent layers with a strong influence in its wetting characteristics. In the case of oxides like TiO{sub 2}, Cu{sub 2}O, SiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, surface hydroxyls form readily on defects upon exposure to water vapor and help nucleate the subsequent growth of molecular water films. On pure metals, such as Pt, Pd, and Ru, the structure of the first water layer and whether or not it exhibits dangling H bonds is again crucial. Dangling H-bonds are provided by molecules with their plane oriented vertically, or by OH groups formed by the partial dissociation of water. By tying the two II atoms of the water molecules into strong H-bonds with pre-adsorbed O on Ru can also quench the wettability of the surface.
Date: September 1, 2008
Creator: Salmeron, M.; Bluhm, H.; Tatarkhanov, M.; Ketteler, G.; Shimizu, T.K.; Mugarza, A. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

DILUTE SURFACTANT METHODS FOR CARBONATE FORMATIONS

Description: There are many carbonate reservoirs in US (and the world) with light oil and fracture pressure below its minimum miscibility pressure (or reservoir may be naturally fractured). Many carbonate reservoirs are naturally fractured. Waterflooding is effective in fractured reservoirs, if the formation is water-wet. Many fractured carbonate reservoirs, however, are mixed-wet and recoveries with conventional methods are low (less than 10%). Thermal and miscible tertiary recovery techniques are not effective in these reservoirs. Surfactant flooding (or huff-n-puff) is the only hope, yet it was developed for sandstone reservoirs in the past. The goal of this research is to evaluate dilute (hence relatively inexpensive) surfactant methods for carbonate formations and identify conditions under which they can be effective. We have acquired field oil and core samples and field brine compositions from Marathon. We have conducted preliminary adsorption and wettability studies. Addition of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} decreases anionic surfactant adsorption on calcite surface. Receding contact angles increase with surfactant adsorption. Plans for the next quarter include conducting adsorption, phase behavior and wettability studies.
Date: January 1, 2003
Creator: Mohanty, Kishore K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Theories of hydrophobic effects and the description of free volume in complex liquids

Description: Recent progress on molecular theories of hydration of nonpolar solutes in liquid aqueous solution has lead to new ways to thinking about the old issue of free volume in liquids. This article surveys the principal new results with particular attention to the context of general issues of packing in liquids.
Date: December 1998
Creator: Pratt, L. R.; Garde, S. & Hummer, G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Advanced reservoir characterization and evaluation of CO{sub 2} gravity drainage in the naturally fractured Spraberry reservoir. Quarterly technical report, April 1, 1996--June 30, 1996

Description: Progress has been made in the area of laboratory analysis of Spraberry oil/brine/rock interactions during this quarter. Water imbibition experiments were conducted under ambient conditions, using cleaned Spraberry cores, synthetic Spraberry reservoir brine, and Spraberry oil. It has been concluded that the Spraberry reservoir cores are weakly water-wet. The average Amott wettability index to water is about 0.55. The average oil recovery due to spontaneous water imbibition is about 50% of original oil in place.
Date: November 1, 1996
Creator: Schechter, D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Wetting behavior of selected crude oil/brine/rock systems

Description: Of the many methods of characterizing wettability of a porous medium, the most commonly used are the Amott test and the USBM test. The Amott test does not discriminate adequately between systems that give high values of wettability index to water and are collectively described as very strongly water-wet. The USBM test does not recognize systems that achieve residual oil saturation by spontaneous imbibition. For such systems, and for any systems that exhibit significant spontaneous imbibition, measurements of imbibition rate provide a useful characterization of wettability. Methods of interpreting spontaneous imbibition data are reviewed and a new method of quantifying wettability from rate of imbibition is proposed. Capillary pressure is the driving force in spontaneous imbibition. The area under an imbibition curve is closely related to the work of displacement that results from decrease in surface free energy. Imbibition rate data can be correlated to allow for differences in interracial tension, viscosities, pore structure, and sample size. Wettability, the remaining key factor in determining the capillary driving force and the related imbibition rate, then largely determines the differences in saturation vs. scaled time curves. These curves are used to obtain pseudo imbibition capillary pressure curves; a wettability index based on relative areas under these curves is defined as the relative pseudo work of imbibition. The method is applied for two crude oil/brine/rock systems. Comparison of the method with the Amott wettability index is made for different wettability states given by differences in aging of cores with crude oil. Correlations of wettability indices with waterflood recoveries are presented.
Date: April 1, 1997
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Moisture and aging effects of solder wettability of copper surfaces

Description: Solderability is a critical property of electronic assembly that affects both manufacturing efficiency and product reliability. There is often a considerable time interval between initial fabrication of a circuit board or component and its use at the assembly level. Parts are often stored under a variety of conditions, usually not controlled. Solder wettability can soon deteriorate during storage, especially in extreme environments. This paper describes ongoing efforts at Sandia to quantify solder wettability on bare and aged Cu surfaces. In addition, organic solderability preservatives (OSPs) were applied to the bare Cu to retard solderability loss due to aging. The OSPs generally performed well, although wetting did decrease with exposure time.
Date: December 1, 1996
Creator: Hernandez, C.L.; Sorensen, N.R. & Lucero, S.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department