82 Matching Results

Search Results

Advanced search parameters have been applied.

Acquisition of Crosswell Seismic Monitoring Data

Description: Crosswell seismic acquisition provides an ideal geometry for monitoring travel time changes in the subsurface. Analysis of delay time in terms of a characteristic frequency allows us to estimate optimal acquisition parameters (frequency and distance). We have deployed standard data acquisition equipment for continuous monitoring of crosswell travel time in two separate field experiments, with well spacing of 3 and 30 m. The acquisition hardware used for the field experiments is described, along with environmental effects (such as temperature) that influence the measurements. Two field experiments are described that correlate changes in travel time (and therefore velocity) with changes in barometric pressure. The results from the two field sites show a pressure sensitivity for velocity of 10{sup -6}/Pa to 10{sup -8}/Pa.
Date: February 15, 2008
Creator: Daley, T. M.; Niu, F.; Silver, P.G. & Majer, E.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Application of integrated reservoir management and reservoir characterization to optimize infill drilling, Class II

Description: The major purpose of this project was to demonstrate the use of cost effective reservoir characterization and management tools that will be helpful to both independent and major operators for the optimal development of heterogeneous, low permeability carbonate reservoirs such as the North Robertson (Clearfork) Unit.
Date: March 16, 2000
Creator: Bergeron, Jack; Blasingame, Tom; Doublet, Louis; Kelkar, Mohan; Freeman, George; Callard, Jeff et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Application of Integrated Reservoir Management and Reservoir Characterization to Optimize Infill Drilling

Description: The eighteen 10-acre infill wells which were drilled as part of the field demonstration portion of the project are all currently in service with no operational problems. These wells consist of fourteen producing wells and four injection wells. The producing wells are currently producing a total of approximately 376 bopd, down from a peak rate of 900 bopd. The four injection wells are currently injecting a total of 140 bwipd. Unit production is currently averaging approximately 2,600 bopd, 12,000 bwpd and 18,000 bwipd.
Date: November 3, 1999
Creator: Company, Fina Oil and Chemical
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

INNOVATAIVE METHODOLOGY FOR DETECTION OF FRACTURE-CONTROLLED SWEET SPOTS IN THE NORTHERN APPALACHIAN BASIN

Description: In the structure task, for this reporting period, the authors also edited and revised the map that displays the modified rose diagrams for the data they collected and reduced along the east side of Seneca Lake. They also revised the N-S transect that displays the frequency of ENE-striking fractures, and constructed a new N-S transect that shows the frequency of E-striking fractures. This transect compliments the earlier transect they constructed for fracture frequency of ENE-striking fractures. Significantly, the fracture frequency transect for E-W fractures shows a spike in fracture frequency in the region of the E-striking Firtree anticline that is observed on seismic reflection sections. The ENE fracture set does not exhibit an unusually high fracture frequency in this area. In contrast, the fracture frequency of the ENE-striking set is anomalously high in the region of the Trenton/Black River grabens. They have nearly completed reducing the data they collected from a NNW-SSE transect on the west side of Cayuga Lake and they have constructed modified rose diagrams for most sites. Structure contour maps and isopach maps have been revised based on additional well log analyses. Except for the Glodes Corners Field, the well spacing generally remains insufficient to identify faults or their precise locations. However, relatively sharp elevational changes east of Keuka Lake support the contention that faults occur along the east side of Keuka Lake. Similarly, a single well east of Seneca Lake shows that the Trenton there is low compared to distant wells, based on an assumed regional slope. This same area is where one of the Trenton grabens occurs. They have completed the interpretation of the reprocessed data that Quest licensed and had reprocessed. Several grabens observed in the Trenton and Black River reflectors are consistent with surface structure, soil gas, and aeromagnetic anomalies. In this report ...
Date: June 30, 2002
Creator: Jacobi, Robert & Fountain, John
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

BOAST 98-MC: A Probabilistic Simulation Module for BOAST 98

Description: This work was performed by Advanced Resources International (ARI) on behalf of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) in order to develop a user-friendly, PC-based interface that couples DOE's BOAST 98 software with the Monte Carlo simulation technique. The objectives of the work were to improve reservoir management and maximize oil recoveries by understanding and quantifying reservoir uncertainty as well as improving the capabilities of DOE's BOAST 98 software by incorporating a probabilistic module in the simulator. In this model, probability distributions can be assigned to unknown input parameters such as permeability, porosity, etc. Options have also been added to the input file to be able to vary relative permeability curves as well as well spacing. Hundreds of simulations can then automatically be run to explore the many combinations of uncertain reservoir parameters across their spectrum of uncertainty. Output data such as oil rate and water rate can then be plotted. When historical data are available, they can be uploaded and a least-square error-function run between the simulation data and the history data. The set of input parameters leading to the best match is thus determined. Sensitivity charts (Tornado plots) that rank the uncertain parameters according to the impact they have on the outputs can also be generated.
Date: September 8, 2006
Creator: Sultana, Aiysha; Oudinot, Anne; Gonzalez, Reynaldo & Reeves, Scott
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Petrophysical Analysis and Geographic Information System for San Juan Basin Tight Gas Reservoirs

Description: The primary goal of this project is to increase the availability and ease of access to critical data on the Mesaverde and Dakota tight gas reservoirs of the San Juan Basin. Secondary goals include tuning well log interpretations through integration of core, water chemistry and production analysis data to help identify bypassed pay zones; increased knowledge of permeability ratios and how they affect well drainage and thus infill drilling plans; improved time-depth correlations through regional mapping of sonic logs; and improved understanding of the variability of formation waters within the basin through spatial analysis of water chemistry data. The project will collect, integrate, and analyze a variety of petrophysical and well data concerning the Mesaverde and Dakota reservoirs of the San Juan Basin, with particular emphasis on data available in the areas defined as tight gas areas for purpose of FERC. A relational, geo-referenced database (a geographic information system, or GIS) will be created to archive this data. The information will be analyzed using neural networks, kriging, and other statistical interpolation/extrapolation techniques to fine-tune regional well log interpretations, improve pay zone recognition from old logs or cased-hole logs, determine permeability ratios, and also to analyze water chemistries and compatibilities within the study area. This single-phase project will be accomplished through four major tasks: Data Collection, Data Integration, Data Analysis, and User Interface Design. Data will be extracted from existing databases as well as paper records, then cleaned and integrated into a single GIS database. Once the data warehouse is built, several methods of data analysis will be used both to improve pay zone recognition in single wells, and to extrapolate a variety of petrophysical properties on a regional basis. A user interface will provide tools to make the data and results of the study accessible and useful. The final deliverable ...
Date: October 1, 2008
Creator: Cather, Martha; Lee, Robert; Balch, Robert; Engler, Tom; Ruan, Roger & Ma, Shaojie
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Sensitivity Analysis of Gas Production from Class 2 and Class 3 Hydrate Deposits

Description: Gas hydrates are solid crystalline compounds in which gas molecules are lodged within the lattices of an ice-like crystalline solid. The vast quantities of hydrocarbon gases trapped in hydrate formations in the permafrost and in deep ocean sediments may constitute a new and promising energy source. Class 2 hydrate deposits are characterized by a Hydrate-Bearing Layer (HBL) that is underlain by a saturated zone of mobile water. Class 3 hydrate deposits are characterized by an isolated Hydrate-Bearing Layer (HBL) that is not in contact with any hydrate-free zone of mobile fluids. Both classes of deposits have been shown to be good candidates for exploitation in earlier studies of gas production via vertical well designs - in this study we extend the analysis to include systems with varying porosity, anisotropy, well spacing, and the presence of permeable boundaries. For Class 2 deposits, the results show that production rate and efficiency depend strongly on formation porosity, have a mild dependence on formation anisotropy, and that tighter well spacing produces gas at higher rates over shorter time periods. For Class 3 deposits, production rates and efficiency also depend significantly on formation porosity, are impacted negatively by anisotropy, and production rates may be larger, over longer times, for well configurations that use a greater well spacing. Finally, we performed preliminary calculations to assess a worst-case scenario for permeable system boundaries, and found that the efficiency of depressurization-based production strategies are compromised by migration of fluids from outside the system.
Date: May 1, 2008
Creator: Reagan, Matthew; Moridis, George & Zhang, Keni
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Improved recovery demonstration for Williston Basin carbonates. Final report

Description: The purpose of this project was to demonstrate targeted infill and extension drilling opportunities, better determinations of oil-in-place, and methods for improved completion efficiency. The investigations and demonstrations were focussed on Red River and Ratcliffe reservoirs in the Williston Basin within portions of Montana, North Dakota and South Dakota. Both of these formations have been successfully explored with conventional 2-dimensional (2D) seismic. Improved reservoir characterization utilizing 3-dimensional (3D) seismic was investigated for identification of structural and stratigraphic reservoir compartments. These seismic characterizations were integrated with geological and engineering studies. The project tested lateral completion techniques, including high-pressure jetting lance technology and short-radius lateral drilling to enhance completion efficiency. Lateral completions should improve economics for both primary and secondary oil where low permeability is a problem and higher-density drilling of vertical infill wells is limited by drilling cost. New vertical wells were drilled to test bypassed oil in ares that were identified by 3D seismic. These new wells are expected to recover as much or greater oil than was produced by nearby old wells. The project tested water injection through vertical and horizontal wells in reservoirs where application of waterflooding has been limited. A horizontal well was drilled for testing water injection. Injection rates were tested at three times that of a vertical well. This demonstration well shows that water injection with horizontal completions can improve injection rates for economic waterflooding. This report is divided into two sections, part 1 covers the Red River and part 2 covers the Ratcliffe. Each part summarizes integrated reservoir characterizations and outlines methods for targeting by-passed oil reserves in the respective formation and locality.
Date: July 1, 1998
Creator: Sippel, M.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

An integrated study of the Grayburg/San Andres reservoir, Foster and South Cowden fields, Ector County, Texas. Quarterly report, April 1--June 31, 1996. Revision

Description: The principal objective of this research is to demonstrate in the field that 3D seismic data can be used to aid in identifying porosity zones, permeability barriers and thief zones and thereby improve waterflood design. Geologic and engineering data will be integrated with the geophysical data to result in a detailed reservoir characterization. Reservoir simulation will then be used to determine infill drilling potential and the optimum waterflood design for the project area. This design will be implemented and the success of the waterflood evaluated.
Date: October 17, 1996
Creator: Trentham, R. C.; Weinbrandt, R. & Robertson, W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Application of advanced reservoir characterization, simulation, and production optimization strategies to maximize recovery in slope and basin clastic reservoirs, West Texas (Delaware Basin), Class III

Description: The objective of this Class 3 project was to demonstrate that detailed reservoir characterization of slope and basin clastic reservoirs in sandstones of the Delaware Mountain Group in the Delaware Basin of West Texas and New Mexico is a cost effective way to recover a higher percentage of the original oil in place through strategic placement of infill wells and geologically based field development. Phase 1 of the project, reservoir characterization, was completed this year, and Phase 2 began. The project is focused on East Ford field, a representative Delaware Mountain Group field that produces from the upper Bell Canyon Formation (Ramsey sandstone). The field, discovered in 1960, is operated by Oral Petco, Inc., as the East Ford unit. A CO{sub 2} flood is being conducted in the unit, and this flood is the Phase 2 demonstration for the project.
Date: May 24, 2000
Creator: Dutton, Shirley P.; Flanders, William A. & Zirczy, Helena H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Advanced Reservoir Characterization in the Antelope Shale to Establish the Viability of CO2 Enhanced Oil Recovery in California's Monterey Formation Siliceous Shales, Class III

Description: This report describes the evaluation, design, and implementation of a DOE funded CO2 pilot project in the Lost Hills Field, Kern County, California. The pilot consists of four inverted (injector-centered) 5-spot patterns covering approximately 10 acres, and is located in a portion of the field, which has been under waterflood since early 1992. The target reservoir for the CO2 pilot is the Belridge Diatomite. The pilot location was selected based on geology, reservoir quality and reservoir performance during the waterflood. A CO2 pilot was chosen, rather than full-field implementation, to investigate uncertainties associated with CO2 utilization rate and premature CO2 breakthrough, and overall uncertainty in the unproven CO2 flood process in the San Joaquin Valley.
Date: April 4, 2001
Creator: Perri, Pasquale R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Application of integrated reservoir management and reservoir characterization to optimize infill drilling. Quarterly technical progress report, September 13--December 12, 1997

Description: The eighteen 10-acre infill wells which were drilled as part of the field demonstration portion of the project are all currently in service with no operational problems. These wells consist of fourteen producing wells and four injection wells. The producing wells are currently producing a total of approximately 450 bopd, down from a peak rate of 900 bopd. Unit production is currently averaging approximately 2,700 bopd, 12,000 bwpd and 18,000 bwipd. The paper describes progress on hydraulic fracture design, reservoir surveillance, data analysis procedures, and deterministic modeling and simulation.
Date: July 1, 1998
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Application of advanced reservoir characterization, simulation, and production optimization strategies to maximize recovery in slope and basin clastic reservoirs, West Texas (Delaware Basin), Class III

Description: The objective of this Class 3 project was demonstrate that detailed reservoir characterization of slope and basin clastic reservoirs in sandstone's of the Delaware Mountain Group in the Delaware Basin of West Texas and New Mexico is a cost effective way to recover a higher percentage of the original oil in place through strategic placement of infill wells and geologically based field development. Project objectives are divided into two main phases. The original objectives of the reservoir-characterization phase of the project were (1) to provide a detailed understanding of the architecture and heterogeneity of two representative fields of the Delaware Mountain Group, Geraldine Ford and Ford West, which produce from the Bell Canyon and Cherry Canyon Formations, respectively, (2) to chose a demonstration area in one of the fields, and (3) to simulate a CO{sub 2} flood in the demonstration area.
Date: July 7, 2000
Creator: Dutton, Shirley P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Geological and petrophysical characterization of the Ferron Sandstone for 3-D simulation of a fluvial-deltaic reservoir. Technical progress report, October 1--December 1997

Description: The objective of this project is to develop a comprehensive, interdisciplinary, and quantitative characterization of a fluvial-deltaic reservoir which will allow realistic inter-well and reservoir-scale modeling to be constructed for improved oil-field development in similar reservoirs world-wide. The geological and petrophysical properties of the Cretaceous Ferron Sandstone in east-central Utah will be quantitatively determined. Both new and existing data will be integrated into a three-dimensional representation of spatial variations in porosity, storativity, and tensorial rock permeability at a scale appropriate for inter-well to regional-scale reservoir simulation. Results could improve reservoir management through proper infill and extension drilling strategies, reduction of economic risks, increased recovery from existing oil fields, and more reliable reserve calculations. Transfer of the project results to the petroleum industry is an integral component of the project. Two activities continued this quarter as part of the geological and petrophysical characterization of the fluvial-deltaic Ferron Sandstone and are described within: (1) regional stratigraphic interpretation and (2) technology transfer.
Date: January 1, 1998
Creator: Allison, M.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Application of Advanced Reservoir Characterization, Simulation, and Production Optimization Strategies to Maximize Recovery in Slope and Basin Clastic Reservoirs, West Texas (Delaware Basin)

Description: The objective of this Class 3 project was demonstrate that detailed reservoir characterization of slope and basin clastic reservoirs in sandstones of the Delaware Mountain Group in the Delaware Basin of West Texas and New Mexico is a cost effective way to recover a higher percentage of the original oil in place through strategic placement of infill wells and geologically based field development. Project objectives are divided into two main phases. The original objectives of the reservoir-characterization phase of the project were (1) to provide a detailed understanding of the architecture and heterogeneity of two representative fields of the Delaware Mountain Group, Geraldine Ford and Ford West, which produce from the Bell Canyon and Cherry Canyon Formations, respectively, (2) to chose a demonstration area in one of the fields, and (3) to simulate a CO 2 flood in the demonstration area.
Date: November 9, 1999
Creator: Dutton, Shirley
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Application of Advanced Reservoir Characterization, Simulation, and Production Optimization Strategies to Maximize Recovery in Slope and Basin Clastic Reservoirs, West Texas (Delaware Basin)

Description: The objective of this Class 3 project was demonstrate that detailed reservoir characterization of slope and basin clastic reservoirs in sandstones of the Delaware Mountain Group in the Delaware Basin of West Texas and New Mexico is a cost effective way to recover a higher percentage of the original oil in place through strategic placement of infill wells and geologically based field development. Project objectives are divided into two main phases. The original objectives of the reservoir-characterization phase of the project were (1) to provide a detailed understanding of the architecture and heterogeneity of two representative fields of the Delaware Mountain Group, Geraldine Ford and Ford West, which produce from the Bell Canyon and Cherry Canyon Formations, respectively, (2) to chose a demonstration area in one of the fields, and (3) to simulate a CO 2 flood in the demonstration area.
Date: November 9, 1999
Creator: Dutton, Shirley P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

IMPROVED MISCIBLE NITROGEN FLOOD PERFORMANCE UTILIZING ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND HORIZONTAL LATERALS IN A CLASS I RESERVOIR--EAST BINGER (MARCHAND) UNIT

Description: Implementation of the work program of Budget Period 2 of the East Binger Unit (''EBU'') DOE Project is complete. Two additional vertical infill wells were drilled, completed, and brought on production during the reporting period. These were the last two of five wells to be drilled in the pilot area. Additional drilling is planned for Budget Period 3. Overall response to the various projects continues to be very favorable. Nitrogen injection into the pilot area had doubled prior to unrelated nitrogen supply problems, while gas production and nitrogen content of produced gas have both decreased. Nitrogen recycle within the pilot area has dropped from 60% to 20%. Meanwhile, pilot area oil production has increased from 300 bpd prior to development to an average of 435 bpd for January through March 2004. March production was the highest at 542 bpd due to the addition of the two new vertical wells. Production performances of the new wells continue to support the current opinion that horizontal wells do not provide sufficient additional production over vertical wells to justify their incremental cost.
Date: June 3, 2004
Creator: Sinner, Joe
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Field Demonstration of Horizontal Infill Drilling Using Cost-effective Integrated Reservoir Modeling--Mississippian Carbonates, Central Kansas

Description: Mississippian carbonate reservoirs have produced in excess of 1 billion barrels of oil in Kansas accounting for over 16% of the state's production. With declining production from other age reservoirs, the contribution of Mississippian reservoirs to Kansas's oil production has risen to 43% as of 2004. However, solution-enhanced features such as vertical shale intervals extending from the karst erosional surface at the top introduce complexities/compartmentalizations in Mississippian carbonate reservoirs. Coupled with this, strong water drives charge many of these reservoirs resulting in limited drainage from vertical wells due to high water cuts after an initial period of low water production. Moreover, most of these fields are operated by small independent operators without access to the knowledge bank of modern research in field characterization and exploitation/development practices. Thus, despite increasing importance of Mississippian fields to Kansas production, these fields are beset with low recovery factors and high abandonment rates leaving significant resources in the ground. Worldwide, horizontal infill wells have been successful in draining compartmentalized reservoirs with limited pressure depletion. The intent of this project was to demonstrate the application of horizontal wells to successfully exploit the remaining potential in mature Mississippian fields of the mid-continent. However, it is of critical importance that for horizontal wells to be economically successful, they must be selectively targeted. This project demonstrated the application of initial and secondary screening methods, based on publicly available data, to quickly shortlist fields in a target area for detailed studies to evaluate their potential to infill horizontal well applications. Advanced decline curve analyses were used to estimate missing well-level production data and to verify if the well produced under unchanging bottom-hole conditions--two commonly occurring data constraints afflicting mature Mississippian fields. A publicly accessible databank of representative petrophysical properties and relationships was developed to overcome the paucity of such data ...
Date: August 31, 2005
Creator: Bhattacharya, Saibal
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

INNOVATIVE METHODOLOGY FOR DETECTION OF FRACTURE-CONTROLLED SWEET SPOTS IN THE NORTHERN APPALACHIAN BASIN

Description: In the structure task, the authors completed reducing the data they had collected from a N-S transect on the east side of Seneca Lake. They have calculated the fracture frequency for all the fracture sets at each site, and constructed modified rose diagrams that summarize the fracture attributes at each site. These data indicate a N-striking fault near the southeastern shore of Seneca Lake, and also indicate NE and ENE-trending FIDs and faults north of Valois. The orientation and existence of the ENE-striking FIDs and faults are thought to be guided by faults in the Precambrian basement. These basement faults apparently were sufficiently reactivated to cause faulting in the Paleozoic section. Other faults are thrust ramps above the Silurian salt section that were controlled by a far-field Alleghanian stress field. Structure contour maps and isopach maps have been revised based on additional well log analyses. Except for the Glodes Corners Field, the well spacing generally is insufficient to definitely identify faults. However, relatively sharp elevational changes east of Keuka Lake support the contention that faults occur along the east side of Keuka Lake. Outcrop stratigraphy along the east side of Seneca Lake indicates that faults and gentle folds can be inferred from some exposures along Seneca Lake, but the lensing nature of the individual sandstones can preclude long-distance definite correlations and structure identification. Soil gas data collected during the 2000 field season was reduced and displayed in the previous semiannual report. The seismic data that Quest licensed has been reprocessed. Several grabens observed in the Trenton reflector are consistent with surface structure, soil gas, and aeromagnetic anomalies. In this report they display an interpreted seismic line that crosses the Glodes Corners and Muck Farms fields. The final report from the subcontractor concerning the completed aeromagnetic survey is included. Prominent magnetic ...
Date: June 30, 2001
Creator: Jacobi, Robert & Fountain, John
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

EVALUATION OF THE FLOOD POTENTIAL OF THE SOUTH HOUSE (BLINEBRY) FIELD, LEA COUNTY, NEW MEXICO

Description: The Blinebry (Permian) formation of eastern Lea County, NM has a long history of exploitation for petroleum and continues even today to be a strong target horizon for new drilling in the Permian Basin. Because of this long-standing interest it should be classified of strategic interest to domestic oil production; however, the formation has gained a reputation as a primary production target with limited to no flooding potential. In late May of 1999, a project to examine the feasibility of waterflooding the Blinebry formation was proposed to the U.S. Department of Energy's National Petroleum Technology Office (Tulsa, OK). A new well was proposed in one region (the South House area) to examine the reputation by acquiring core and borehole logging data for the collection of formation property data in order to conduct the waterflood evaluation. Notice of the DOE award was received on August 19, 1999 and the preparations for drilling, coring and logging were immediately made for a drilling start on 9/9/99. The Blinebry formation at 6000 feet, foot depth was reached on 9/16/99 and the coring of two 60 foot intervals of the Blinebry was completed on 9/19/99 with more than 98% core recovery. The well was drilled to a total depth of 7800 feet and the Blinebry interval was logged with spectral gamma ray, photoelectric cross section, porosity, resistivity, and borehole image logs on 8/24/99. The well was determined to be likely productive from the Blinebry interval and five & 1/2 inch casing was cemented in the hole on 9/25/99. Detailed core descriptions including environment of deposition have been accomplished. Whole core (a 4-inch diameter) and plug (1.5 inch diameter) testing for formation properties has been completed and are reported. Acquisition and analysis of the borehole logging results have been completed and are reported. Perforation of the ...
Date: December 1, 2000
Creator: Melzer, L. Stephen
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Application of advanced reservoir characterization, simulation, and production optimization strategies to maximize recovery in slope and basin clastic reservoirs, West Texas. Technical progress report, April 1--June 30, 1995

Description: The objective of this project is to demonstrate that detailed reservoir characterization of slope and basin clastic reservoirs in sandstones of the Delaware Mountain Group in the Delaware Basin of West Texas and New mexico is a cost-effective way to recover a higher percentage of the original oil in place through strategic placement of infill wells and geologically based field development. Project objectives are divided into two major phases. The objectives of the reservoir characterization phase of the project are to provide a detailed understanding of the architecture and heterogeneity of two fields, the Ford Geraldine Unit and Ford West field, which produce from the Bell Canyon and Cherry Canyon Formations, respectively, of the Delaware Mountain Group and to compare Bell Canyon and Cherry Canyon reservoirs. Reservoir characterization will utilize 3-D seismic data, high-resolution sequence stratigraphy, subsurface field studies, outcrop characterization, and other techniques. Once the reservoir characterization study of both fields is completed, a pilot area of approximately 1 mi{sup 2} in one of the fields will be chosen for reservoir simulation. The objectives of the implementation phase of the project are to (1) apply the knowledge gained from reservoir characterization and simulation studies to increase recovery from the pilot area, (2) demonstrate that economically significant unrecovered oil remains in geologically resolvable untapped compartments, and (3) test the accuracy of reservoir characterization and flow simulation as predictive tools in resource preservation of mature fields. A geologically designed, enhanced recovery program (CO{sub 2} flood, waterflood, or polymer flood) and well-completion program will be developed, and one to three infill wells will be drilled and cored.
Date: June 30, 1995
Creator: Dutton, S.P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Geopressured Energy Resource Evaluation

Description: The geopressured aquifers that extend along the northern Gulf of Mexico are a large, perhaps the largest, potential source of geothermal energy and natural gas in the US. Because of the high cost of completing wells into these formations and their relatively low temperatures (200 to 400 F), the utilization of the geothermal energy will be highly depend on, and of secondary importance to, the value of the methane. The economics of extracting either the geothermal energy or natural gas from these aquifers does not look promising. The combined requirements of high well flow rates (40,000 bbl/day), long life (20 years), and the necessity for close well spacing to minimize the cost of the collection system may be incompatible with the actual characteristics of the reservoirs. These factors place such stringent requirements on the reservoir size, permeability, and compressibility, or specific storage coefficient, that the number of promising production areas may be severely limited.
Date: May 1, 1979
Creator: Samuels, Garland
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Wettability and Oil Recovery by Imbibition and Viscous Displacement from Fractured and Heterogeneous Carbonates

Description: About one-half of U.S. oil reserves are held in carbonate formations. The remaining oil in carbonate reservoirs is regarded as the major domestic target for improved oil recovery. Carbonate reservoirs are often fractured and have great complexity even at the core scale. Formation evaluation and prediction is often subject to great uncertainty. This study addresses quantification of crude oil/brine/rock interactions and the impact of reservoir heterogeneity on oil recovery by spontaneous imbibition and viscous displacement from pore to field scale. Wettability-alteration characteristics of crude oils were measured at calcite and dolomite surfaces and related to the properties of the crude oils through asphaltene content, acid and base numbers, and refractive index. Oil recovery was investigated for a selection of limestones and dolomites that cover over three orders of magnitude in permeability and a factor of four variation in porosity. Wettability control was achieved by adsorption from crude oils obtained from producing carbonate reservoirs. The induced wettability states were compared with those measured for reservoir cores. The prepared cores were used to investigate oil recovery by spontaneous imbibition and viscous displacement. The results of imbibition tests were used in wettability characterization and to develop mass transfer functions for application in reservoir simulation of fractured carbonates. Studies of viscous displacement in carbonates focused on the unexpected but repeatedly observed sensitivity of oil recovery to injection rate. The main variables were pore structure, mobility ratio, and wettability. The potential for improved oil recovery from rate-sensitive carbonate reservoirs by increased injection pressure, increased injectivity, decreased well spacing or reduction of interfacial tension was evaluated.
Date: April 1, 2006
Creator: Morrow, Norman R. & Buckley, Jill
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Intrinsic and Extrinsic Chemical and Isotopic Tracers for Characterization Of Groundwater Systems

Description: In many regions, three dimensional characterization of the groundwater regime is limited by coarse well spacing or borehole lithologic logs of low quality. However, regulatory requirements for drinking water or site remediation may require collection of extensive chemical and water quality data from existing wells. Similarly, for wells installed in the distant past, lithologic logs may not be available, but the wells can be sampled for chemical and isotopic constituents. In these situations, a thorough analysis of trends in chemical and isotopic constituents can be a key component in characterizing the regional groundwater system. On a basin or subbasin scale, especially in areas of intensive groundwater management where artificial recharge is important, introduction of an extrinsic tracer can provide a robust picture of groundwater flow. Dissolved gases are particularly good tracers since a large volume of water can be tagged, there are no real or perceived health risks associated with the tracer, and a very large dynamic range allows detection of a small amount of tagged water in well discharge. Recent applications of the application of extrinsic tracers, used in concert with intrinsic chemical and isotopic tracers, demonstrate the power of chemical analyses in interpreting regional subsurface flow regimes.
Date: September 13, 2007
Creator: Moran, J E; Singleton, M J; Carle, S F & Esser, B K
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department