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A Study of a Solvent Analytical Separation of Waxes from Petroleum and its Lubricating Fractions

Description: Report issued by the Bureau of Mines discussing studies conducted on the wax byproducts of crude petroleum. As stated in the scope of report, "this report discusses the principal methods given in the literature for the quantitative determination of wax in petroleum and its fractions by the use of selective solvents" (p. 3). This report includes tables, and illustrations.
Date: 1938
Creator: Horne, Joseph W. & Holliman, W. C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Separation of Fischer-Tropsch Wax from Catalyst by Supercritical Extraction

Description: Further progress in achieving the objectives of the project was made in the period of January I to March 31, 1998. The direct numerical simulation of particle removal process in turbulent gas flows was completed. Variations of particle trajectories are studied. It is shown that the near wall vortices profoundly affect the particle removal process in turbulent boundary layer flows. Experimental data for transport and deposition of fibrous particles in the aerosol wind tunnel was obtained. The measured deposition velocity for irregular fibrous particles is compared with the empirical correlation and the available data for glass fibers and discussed. Additional progress on the sublayer model for evaluating the particle deposition and resuspension in turbulent flows was made.
Date: April 30, 1998
Creator: Thies, Mark C. & Joyce, Patrick C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Separation of Fischer-Tropsch Wax from Catalyst by Supercritical Extraction

Description: Further progress in achieving the objectives of the project was made in the period of January I to March 31, 1998. The direct numerical simulation of particle removal process in turbulent gas flows was completed. Variations of particle trajectories are studied. It is shown that the near wall vortices profoundly affect the particle removal process in turbulent boundary layer flows. Experimental data for transport and deposition of fibrous particles in the aerosol wind tunnel was obtained. The measured deposition velocity for irregular fibrous particles is compared with the empirical correlation and the available data for glass fibers and discussed. Additional progress on the sublayer model for evaluating the particle deposition and resuspension in turbulent flows was made.
Date: January 31, 1998
Creator: Thies, Mark C. & Joyce, Patrick C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

South Asian Summer Monsoon and Its Relationship with ENSO in the IPCC AR4 Simulations

Description: In this paper we use the extensive integrations produced for the IPCC Fourth Assessment Report (AR4) to examine the relationship between ENSO and the monsoon at interannual and decadal timescales. We begin with an analysis of the monsoon simulation in the 20th century integrations. Six of the 18 models were found to have a reasonably realistic representation of monsoon precipitation climatology. For each of these six models SST and anomalous precipitation evolution along the equatorial Pacific during El Nino events display considerable differences when compared to observations. Out of these six models only four (GFDL{_}CM{_}2.0, GFDL{_}CM{_}2.1, MRI, and MPI{_}ECHAM5) exhibit a robust ENSO-monsoon contemporaneous teleconnection, including the known inverse relationship between ENSO and rainfall variations over India. Lagged correlations between the all-India rainfall (AIR) index and Nino3.4 SST reveal that three models represent the timing of the teleconnection, including the spring predictability barrier which is manifested as the transition from positive to negative correlations prior to the monsoon onset. Furthermore, only one of these three models (GFDL{_}CM{_}2.1) captures the observed phase lag with the strongest anticorrelation of SST peaking 2-3 months after the summer monsoon, which is partially attributable to the intensity of simulated El Nino itself. We find that the models that best capture the ENSO-monsoon teleconnection are those that correctly simulate the timing and location of SST and diabatic heating anomalies in the equatorial Pacific, and the associated changes to the equatorial Walker Circulation during El Nino events. The strength of the AIR-Nino3.4 SST correlation in the model runs waxes and wanes to some degree on decadal timescales. The overall magnitude and timescale for this decadal modulation in most of the models is similar to that seen in observations. However, there is little consistency in the phase among the realizations, suggesting a lack of predictability of the decadal ...
Date: September 7, 2005
Creator: Annamalai, H.; Hamilton, K. & Sperber, K. R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Removal of asphaltene and paraffin deposits using micellar solutions and fused reactions. Final report, 1995--1997

Description: Chemical treatments of paraffin and asphaltene deposition by means of cleaning fluids were carried out in this research project. Research focused on the characterization of asphaltene and paraffin materials and dissolution of asphaltene and paraffin deposits using surfactant/micellar fluids developed early in the project. The key parameters controlling the dissolution rate were identified and the process of asphaltene/paraffin dissolution were examined using microscopic apparatus. Numerical modeling was also carried out to understand the dissolution of paraffin deposits. The results show that fused chemical reaction systems are a promising way of removing paraffin deposits in subsea pipelines. The fused system may be in the form of alternate pulses, emulsions systems or encapsulated catalyst systems. Fused reaction systems, in fact, are extremely cost-effective--less than 10% of the cost of replacing entire sections of the blocked pipeline. The results presented in this report can have a real impact on the petroleum industry and the National Oil Program, if it is realized that the remediation technologies developed here can substantially delay abandonment (due to asphaltene/paraffin plugging) of domestic petroleum resources. The report also sheds new light on the nature and properties of asphaltenes and paraffin deposits which will ultimately help the scientific and research community to develop effective methods in eliminating asphaltene/paraffin deposition problems. It must also be realized that asphaltene remediation technologies developed and presented in this report are a real alternative to aromatic cleaning fluids currently used by the petroleum industry.
Date: May 1, 1998
Creator: Chang, C.L.; Nalwaya, V.; Singh, P. & Fogler, H.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Separation of Fischer-Tropsch Wax from Catalyst by Supercritical Extraction

Description: The proposed process of using supercritical fluid extraction in conjunction with the Fischer-Tropsch slurry bubble column reactor has been examined using the ASPEN Plus simulator by the research group at North Carolina State University. Qualitative results have been obtained for varying the following process parameters: solvent-to-wax ratio, solvent type (pentane or hexane), extraction temperature and pressure, and recovery unit temperature and pressure. The region of retrograde behavior was determined for pentane and hexane. Initial results show hexane to be the superior solvent; compared to pentane, hexane requires lower quantities of solvent makeup (the amount of solvent which needs to be added to account for solvent that cannot be recycled), and also results in a lower average molecular weight of slurry in the reactor. Studies indicate that increasing the extraction temperature, extraction pressure, recovery temperature, or solvent to wax ratio decreases the amount solvent makeup required. Decreasing the recovery pressure was found to decrease the makeup flowrate.
Date: January 31, 1997
Creator: Joyce, P.C. & Thies, M.C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Determination of unconverted HDPE in coal/plastics co-liquefaction stream samples

Description: In several coal/plastics liquefaction runs performed by Hydrocarbon Technologies, Inc. (HTI), a substantial amount of incompletely converted high-density polyethylene (HDPE) was present in ash-free recycle resid streams when either the ROSE-SR unit was used in Run POC-2, or the pressure filter unit was used in Runs CMSL-8 and CMSL-9. This indicates that the HDPE is less reactive than coal at the liquefaction conditions used. In these ash-free streams, there is no solid organic or inorganic material arising from the coal, and the incompletely converted HDPE can be recovered by extraction and filtration with tetrahydrofuran (THF) at room temperature. The HDPE (or HDPE-like material, which could also consist of heavy waxes) is THF insoluble. However, in ashy streams, there are both inorganic ({open_quotes}ash{close_quotes}) and organic (unconverted coal) components present from liquefaction of the coal, that interfere with an easy and clean separation of the HDPE from the coal/plastics liquefaction stream sample. Therefore, CONSOL developed an analytical procedure for HDPE in the ashy stream samples based on extraction of HDPE from the sample using hot (150{degrees}C) decalin (decahydronaphthalene), in which the HDPE is soluble. The decalin extraction is both preceded and succeeded by extractions and washes with THF at room temperature, to remove the coal-derived components from the sample.
Date: December 31, 1996
Creator: Robbins, G.A.; Winschel, R.A. & Burke, F.P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Separation of Fischer-Tropsch wax from catalyst by supercritical fluid extraction. Technical progress report, January--March 1995

Description: Objective is to evaluate the potential of supercritical fluid extraction for separating the catalyst slurry of a Fischer-Tropsch (F- T) slurry bubble column reactor into a wax and a concentrated catalyst slurry that is ready for recycle/regeneration. The automated apparatus was evaluated using a toluene-petroleum pitch system. The Statistical Associating Fluid Theory (SAFT) equation will be used to fit the VLE and LLE data for F-T wax-solvent systems; this equation was successful in predicting both phase compositions and average molecular weight distributions.
Date: August 1, 1995
Creator: Thies, M.C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Separation of catalyst from Fischer-Tropsch slurry

Description: This paper describes a process for the separation of catalysts used in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. The separation is accomplished by extraction in which the organic compounds in the wax are dissolved and carried away from the insoluble inorganic catalyst particles that are primarily inorganic. The purified catalyst can be upgraded by various methods.
Date: April 1, 1998
Creator: White, C.M.; Quiring, M.S.; Jensen, K.L.; Hickey, R.F. & Gillham, L.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Determination of Solid-Liquid Equilibria Data for Mixtures of Heavy Hydrocarbons in a Light Solvent

Description: A methodology was developed using an FT-IR spectroscopic technique to obtain solid-liquid equilibria (SLE) data for mixtures of heavy hydrocarbons in significantly lighter hydrocarbon diluents. SLE was examined in multiple Model Oils that were assembled to simulate waxes. The various Model oils were comprised of C-30 to C-44 hydrocarbons in decane. The FT-IR technique was used to identify the wax precipitation temperature (WPT). The DSC technique was also used in the identification of the onset of the two-phase equilibrium in this work. An additional Model oil made up of C-20 to C-30 hydrocarbons in decane was studied using the DSC experiment. The weight percent solid below the WPT was calculated using the FT-IR experimental results. The WPT and the weight percent solid below the WPT were predicted using an activity coefficient based thermodynamic model. The FT-IR spectroscopy method is found to successfully provide SLE data and also has several advantages over other laboratory-based methods.
Date: June 1, 2003
Creator: Hanson, F.V.; Fletcher, J.V. & R., Karthik
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Carbon Isotopic Studies of Assimilated and Ecosystem Respired CO2 in a Southeastern Pine Forest

Description: Carbon dioxide is the major “greenhouse” gas responsible for global warming. Southeastern pine forests appear to be among the largest terrestrial sinks of carbon dioxide in the US. This collaborative study specifically addressed the isotopic signatures of the large fluxes of carbon taken up by photosynthesis and given off by respiration in this ecosystem. By measuring these isotopic signatures at the ecosystem level, we have provided data that will help to more accurately quantify the magnitude of carbon fluxes on the regional scale and how these fluxes vary in response to climatic parameters such as rainfall and air temperature. The focus of the MBL subcontract was to evaluate how processes operating at the physiological and ecosystem scales affects the resultant isotopic signature of plant waxes that are emitted as aerosols into the convective boundary layer. These wax aerosols provide a large-spatial scale integrative signal of isotopic discrimination of atmospheric carbon dioxide by terrestrial photosynthesis (Conte and Weber 2002). The ecosystem studies have greatly expanded of knowledge of wax biosynthetic controls on their isootpic signature The wax aerosol data products produced under this grant are directly applicable as input for global carbon modeling studies that use variations in the concentration and carbon isotopic composition of atmospheric carbon dioxide to quantify the magnitude and spatial and temporal patterns of carbon uptake on the global scale.
Date: April 10, 2008
Creator: Conte, Maureen H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Oxidative cleavage of erucic acid for the synthesis of brassylic acid

Description: The main focus of this work is to synthesize Brassylic Acid (BA) using oxidative cleavage of Erucic Acid (EA). Crambe (Crambe abyssinica) is an industrial oilseed grown in North Dakota. Crambe has potential as an industrial fatty acid feedstock as a source of Erucic acid (EA). It has approximately 50-60 % of EA, a C{sub 22} monounsaturated fatty acid. Oxidative cleavage of unsaturated fatty acids derived from oilseeds produces long chain (9, 11, and 13 carbon atoms) dibasic and monobasic acids. These acids are known commercial feedstocks for the preparation of nylons, polyesters, waxes, surfactants, and perfumes. Other sources of EA are Rapeseed seed oil which 50-60 % of EA. Rapeseed is grown outside USA. The oxidative cleavage of EA was done using a high throughput parallel pressure reactor system. Kinetics of the reaction shows that BA yields reach a saturation at 12 hours. H{sub 2}WO{sub 4} was found to be the best catalyst for the oxidative cleavage of EA. High yields of BA were obtained at 80 C with bubbling of O{sub 2} or 10 bar of O{sub 2} for 12 hours.
Date: October 29, 2010
Creator: Nasrullah, Mohammed J.; Thapliyal, Pooja; Pfarr, Erica N.; Dusek, Nicholas S.; Schiele, Kristofer L. & Bahr, James A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The U-tube sampling methodology and real-time analysis of geofluids

Description: The U-tube geochemical sampling methodology, an extension of the porous cup technique proposed by Wood [1973], provides minimally contaminated aliquots of multiphase fluids from deep reservoirs and allows for accurate determination of dissolved gas composition. The initial deployment of the U-tube during the Frio Brine Pilot CO{sub 2} storage experiment, Liberty County, Texas, obtained representative samples of brine and supercritical CO{sub 2} from a depth of 1.5 km. A quadrupole mass spectrometer provided real-time analysis of dissolved gas composition. Since the initial demonstration, the U-tube has been deployed for (1) sampling of fluids down gradient of the proposed Yucca Mountain High-Level Waste Repository, Armagosa Valley, Nevada (2) acquiring fluid samples beneath permafrost in Nunuvut Territory, Canada, and (3) at a CO{sub 2} storage demonstration project within a depleted gas reservoir, Otway Basin, Victoria, Australia. The addition of in-line high-pressure pH and EC sensors allows for continuous monitoring of fluid during sample collection. Difficulties have arisen during U-tube sampling, such as blockage of sample lines from naturally occurring waxes or from freezing conditions; however, workarounds such as solvent flushing or heating have been used to address these problems. The U-tube methodology has proven to be robust, and with careful consideration of the constraints and limitations, can provide high quality geochemical samples.
Date: March 1, 2009
Creator: Freifeld, Barry; Perkins, Ernie; Underschultz, James & Boreham, Chris
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Separation of Fischer-Tropsch Wax Products from Ultrafine Iron Catalyst Particles

Description: In the previous reporting period, modifications were completed for integrating a continuous wax filtration system for a 4 liter slurry bubble column reactor. During the current reporting period, a shakedown of the system was completed. Several problems were encountered with the progressive cavity pump used to circulate the wax/catalyst slurry though the cross-flow filter element and reactor. During the activation of the catalyst with elevated temperature (> 270 C) the elastomer pump stator released sulfur thereby totally deactivating the iron-based catalyst. Difficulties in maintaining an acceptable leak rate from the pump seal and stator housing were also encountered. Consequently, the system leak rate exceeded the expected production rate of wax; therefore, no online filtration could be accomplished. Work continued regarding the characterization of ultra-fine catalyst structures. The effect of carbidation on the morphology of iron hydroxide oxide particles was the focus of the study during this reporting period. Oxidation of Fe (II) sulfate results in predominantly {gamma}-FeOOH particles which have a rod-shaped (nano-needles) crystalline structure. Carbidation of the prepared {gamma}-FeOOH with CO at atmospheric pressure produced iron carbides with spherical layered structure. HRTEM and EDS analysis revealed that carbidation of {gamma}-FeOOH particles changes the initial nano-needles morphology and generates ultrafine carbide particles with irregular spherical shape.
Date: September 30, 2006
Creator: Neathery, James K.; Jacobs, Gary; Sarkar, Amitava; Crawford, Adam & Davis, Burtron H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Separation of Fischer-Tropsch from Catalyst by Supercritical Extraction.

Description: The objective of this research project is to evaluate the potential of supercritical fluid (SCF) extraction for the recovery and fractionation of the wax product from the slurry bubble column (SBC) reactor of the Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) process. The wax, comprised mostly of branched and linear alkanes with a broad molecular weight distribution up to C{sub 100}, will be extracted with a hydrocarbon solvent that has a critical temperature near the operating temperature of the SBC reactor, i.e., 200-300{degrees}C. Initial work is being performed using n-hexane as the solvent.
Date: October 31, 1997
Creator: Joyce, P.C. & Thies, M.C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A characterization and evaluation of coal liquefaction process streams. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1, 1996--September 30, 1996

Description: CONSOL completed characterization of 64 samples from five run conditions of HTI Run ALC-1 (227-94), in which raw and cleaned (oil-agglomerated at low pH) Black Thunder Mine subbituminous coal was fed and processed using only dispersed catalysts in the liquefaction reactors. Extraction of THF-soluble resid from the pressure-filter cakes was more complete when agglomerates were fed, leaving only 5% or less THF solubles in the extracted cakes. When raw coal was fed, the extracted cakes contained 9-34% THF solubles. HTI also observed improved filtration during the periods that agglomerates were fed. Improved operability, if verified by additional work, could be an economically significant benefit of coal cleaning by oil agglomeration at low pH. An apparently higher Mo addition rate (see fourth bullet) may have contributed to the benefits of using oil-agglomerated coal. Other stream sample characteristics changed when oil-agglomerated coal was fed in Conditions 2-4, relative to when uncleaned coal was fed in Conditions 1 and 5. The ash content of the 0-6 bottoms samples was lower when oil-agglomerates were fed. The THF-soluble 524{degrees}C+ resid concentration in the feed slurry doubled when agglomerated coal was fed. Three factors may have influenced these characteristics. Higher coal conversion would have produced more resid. More efficient toluene-extraction of the filter cake would have recycled more resid. Removal of distillate as product to offset oil fed as part of the agglomerated coal would preferentially recycle the heaviest components.
Date: August 1, 1997
Creator: Robbins, G.A.; Brandes, S.D. & Winschel, R.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Separation of fischer-Tropsch Wax from Catalyst by Supercritical Extraction.

Description: Although alkanes are the major constituent of a Fischer-Tropsch wax, significant quantities (e.g., up to 30 wt %) of long-chain alcohol and alkene compounds can also be found in a F-T wax. With the lack of experimental data, the effect that the hydroxy and double-bond functional groups have on the phase behavior of systems containing long- chain hydrocarbons is unknown. Therefore, the phase behavior of the system n-hexane/1-hexadecanol was measured for comparison with the previously measured system n-hexane/hexadecane. Vapor and liquid equilibrium compositions and mixture critical points were measured at 198.9, 251.3, 299.2, and 349.9 {degrees}C at pressures ranging from 6.2 to 46.4 bar. Temperature and pressure measurements for all isotherms are believed to be accurate to better than plus or minus 3 and 4 percent, respectively. Results indicate that the addition of the alcohol group to a C 16 hydrocarbon chain significantly affects the phase behavior with hexane, with the two-phase region extending to significantly higher (i.e., up to about 10 bar higher) pressures. The presence of an alcohol group was also found to be an impediment to obtaining a good fit of the experimental data with the Peng-Robinson equation.
Date: July 31, 1997
Creator: Joyce, P.C.; Thies, M.C.; Sherrard, D.; Biales, J.; Kilpatrick, P. & Roberts, G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

SEPARATION OF FISCHER-TROPSCH WAX FROM CATALYST BY SUPERCRITICAL EXTRACTION

Description: The objective of this research project was to evaluate the potential of supercritical fluid (SCF) extraction for the recovery and fractionation of the wax product from the slurry bubble column (SBC) reactor of the Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) process. The wax, comprised mostly of branched and linear alkanes with a broad molecular weight distribution up to C{sub 100}, is to be extracted with a hydrocarbon solvent that has a critical temperature near the operating temperature of the SBC reactor, i.e., 200-300 C. Aspen Plus{trademark} was used to perform process simulation studies on the proposed extraction process, with Redlich-Kwong-Soave (RKS) being used for the thermodynamic property model. In summary, we have made comprehensive VLE measurements for short alkane + long alkane systems over a wide range of pressures and temperatures, dramatically increasing the amount of high-quality data available for these simple, yet highly relevant systems. In addition, our work has demonstrated that, surprisingly, no current thermodynamic model can adequately predict VLE behavior for these systems. Thus, process simulations (such as those for our proposed SCF extraction process) that incorporate these systems can currently only give results that are qualitative at best. Although significant progress has been made in the past decade, more experimental and theoretical work remain to be done before the phase equilibria of asymmetric alkane mixtures can be predicted with confidence.
Date: March 31, 1999
Creator: Joyce, Patrick C. & Thies, Mark C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Slurry Phase Iron Catalysts for Indirect Coal LIquefaction.

Description: This report covers the fourth six month period of this three year grant under the University Coal Research program. During this period, we have begun the synthesis of precipitated catalysts using a bench-top spray dryer. The influence of binders on particle strength was also studied using the ultrasonic fragmentation approach to derive particle breaking stress. A similar approach was used to derive particle strength of catalysts obtained from Mr. Robert Gormley at FETC. Over the next six month period, this work will be continued while the catalysts prepared here will be examined by TPR to determine reducibility and the extent of adverse iron-silica interactions. A fundamental study of Fe/silica interactions has been performed using temperature programmed reaction and TEM to provide understanding of how the silica binders influence the activity of Fe catalysts. To understand differences in the reducibility of the iron phase caused by silica, we have set up a temperature programmed reduction facility. TPR in H, as well as in CO was performed of Fe/ SiO, catalysts prepared by impregnation as well as by precipitation. What is unique about these studies is that high resolution TEM was performed on samples removed from the reactor at various stages of reduction. This helps provide direct evidence for the phase changes that are detected by TPR. We have continued the analysis of catalysts received from slurry reactor runs at Texas A&M university (TAMU) and the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER) by x-ray diffraction. The purpose of the XRD analysis was to determine the phase composition of catalysts derived from a slurry reaction run using Fe Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. We had previously described how catalyst removed in the hot wax may oxidize to magnetite if the wax is air-exposed. We have now received catalysts from CAER that were removed ...
Date: August 8, 1997
Creator: Datye, A.K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Separation of Fischer-Tropsch wax from catalyst using supercritical fluid extraction. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1, 1995--September 31, 1995

Description: Programming and testing of the highly complex Statistical Associating Fluid Theory (or SAFT) equation of state is essentially complete. As an accuracy check, results from our program were compared and found to be in excellent agreement with those of two other research groups (one in the US and two in Europe) for both a nonassociating (methane-hexadecane) and an associating (carbon dioxide-methanol) system. This equation is being used to model the solubility our model Fischer-Tropsch compounds in supercritical solvents such as hexane. SAFT has been chosen for this work because of its fundamental rigor. Therefore, extension of our model compound results to the poorly defined Fischer-Tropsch waxes should be more successful compared to more empirical equations such as Peng-Robinson. Computer-controlled automation of one of our dynamic supercritical fluid (SCF) extraction apparatus is complete. The apparatus collects samples automatically, dramatically reducing operator manpower and fatigue, and is also capable of controlling the operating pressure more precisely (i.e., within {plus_minus}2 psi). This apparatus (SFE I) will be used for future experiments with actual Fischer-Tropsch waxes. Modification/construction of another apparatus (SCF II) that will be used for our model component-SCF phase equilibria/solubility studies is nearly complete; it is currently being leak-tested. This apparatus was built to handle the low mass flow rates that will be required when measuring solubility data for the more expensive model compounds, such as n-C40. Anticipated results for the next quarter include VLE measurements for hexane-squalane at temperatures to 573 K.
Date: February 1, 1996
Creator: Thies, M.C. & Joyce, P.C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Predicting Pattern Tooling and Casting Dimensions for Investment Casting, Phase III

Description: Efforts during Phase III focused mainly on the shell-alloy systems. A high melting point alloy, 17-4PH stainless steel, was considered. The experimental part of the program was conducted at ORNL and commercial foundries, where wax patterns were injected, molds were invested, and alloys were poured. Shell molds made of fused-silica and alumino-silicates were considered. A literature review was conducted on thermophysical and thermomechanical properties alumino-silicates. Material property data, which were not available from material suppliers, was obtained. For all the properties of 17-4PH stainless steel, the experimental data available in the literature did not cover the entire temperature range necessary for process simulation. Thus, some material properties were evaluated using ProCAST, based on CompuTherm database. A comparison between the predicted material property data and measured property data was made. It was found that most material properties were accurately predicted only over several temperature ranges. No experimental data for plastic modulus were found. Thus, several assumptions were made and ProCAST recommendations were followed in order to obtain a complete set of mechanical property data at high temperatures. Thermal expansion measurements for the 17-4PH alloy were conducted during heating and cooling. As a function of temperature, the thermal expansion for both the alloy and shell mold materials showed different evolution on heating and cooling. Numerical simulations were performed using ProCAST for the investment casting of 17-4PH stainless steel parts in fused silica molds using the thermal expansion obtained on heating and another one with thermal expansion obtained on cooling. Since the fused silica shells had the lowest thermal expansion properties in the industry, the dewaxing phase, including the coupling between wax-shell systems, was neglected. The shell mold was considered to be a pure elastic material. The alloy dimensions were obtained from numerical simulations. For 17-4PH stainless steel parts, the alloy shrinkage factors ...
Date: April 1, 2008
Creator: Sabau, Adrian S
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Shape-selective catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch chemistry : iron-containing particulate catalysts. Activity report : January 1, 2001 - December 31, 2004.

Description: Argonne National Laboratory is carrying out a research program to create, prepare, and evaluate catalysts to promote Fischer-Tropsch (FT) chemistry--specifically, the reaction of hydrogen with carbon monoxide to form long-chain hydrocarbons. In addition to needing high activity, it is desirable that the catalysts have high selectivity and stability with respect to both mechanical strength and aging properties. It is desired that selectivity be directed toward producing diesel fraction components and avoiding excess yields of both light hydrocarbons and heavy waxes. The goal is to produce shape-selective catalysts that have the potential to limit the formation of longchain products and yet retain the active metal sites in a protected 'cage'. This cage also restricts their loss by attrition during use in slurry-bed reactors. The first stage of this program was to prepare and evaluate iron-containing particulate catalysts. This activity report centers upon this first stage of experimentation with particulate FT catalysts. (For reference, a second experimental stage is under way to prepare and evaluate active FT catalysts formed by atomic-layer deposition [ALD] of active components on supported membranes.) To date, experimentation has centered upon the evaluation of a sample of iron-based, spray-dried catalyst prepared by B.H. Davis of the Center of Applied Energy Research (CAER) and samples of his catalyst onto which inorganic 'shells' were deposited. The reference CAER catalyst contained a high level of dispersed fine particles, a portion of which was removed by differential settling. Reaction conditions have been established using a FT laboratory unit such that reasonable levels of CO conversion can be achieved, where therefore a valid catalyst comparison can be made. A wide range of catalytic activities was observed with SiO{sub 2}-coated FT catalysts. Two techniques were used for SiO{sub 2}coating. The first involved a caustic precipitation of SiO{sub 2} from an organo-silicate onto the CAER ...
Date: May 12, 2006
Creator: Cronauer, D. & Engineering, Chemical
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department