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Selected Water Resources Data, Clarion River and Redbank Creek Basins, Northwestern Pennsylvania--Part 2

Description: Abstract: This report presents selected basic data collected during a study of the water resources of the Clarion River and Redbank Creek basins in northwestern Pennsylvania. Hydrologic information including data on aquifers, water levels, and yields is presented for 1,304 wells. Records for 51 springs are also given. The report contains 83 chemical analyses of water samples collected from 30 stream sites and 300 analyses of water from 196 wells and 43 springs. Also included are 103 trace-elements analyses. Monthly and annual means of ground-water levels for six observation wells are tabulated. Benthic invertebrate data from 136 stream sites are listed. Locations of data-collection sites are shown on 50 page-size reductions of 7.5-minute topographic quadrangle maps.
Date: July 1979
Creator: Buckwalter, Theodore F.; Dodge, Clifford H. & Schiner, George R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Geology and ground-water resources of Oswego County, New York

Description: Purpose and scope: This report describes the relationship between geology and ground-water occurrence in Oswego County and indicates how much ground water is likely to be available in any given area. It is a companion to a series of 29 maps produced during 1978-80^1 to document the surficial deposits in the county's 29 quadrangles and includes a compilation of data on representative wells in each quadrangle.
Date: 1982
Creator: Miller, Todd S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

CORRELATION BETWEEN RAINFALL PATTERNS AND THE WATER TABLE IN THEGENERAL SEPARATIONS AREA OF THE SAVANNAH RIVERSITE

Description: The objective of the study was to evaluate rainfall and water table elevation data in search of a correlation that could be used to understand and predict water elevation changes. This information will be useful in placing screen zones for future monitoring wells and operations of groundwater treatment units. Fifteen wells in the General Separations Area (GSA) at Savannah River Site were evaluated from 1986 through 2001. The study revealed that the water table does respond to rainfall with minimal delay. (Water level information was available monthly, which restricted the ability to evaluate a shorter delay period.) Water elevations were found to be related to the cumulative sum (Q-Delta Sum) of the difference between the average rainfall for a specific month and the actual rainfall for that month, calculated from an arbitrary starting point. Water table elevations could also be correlated between wells, but using the right well for correlation was very important. The strongest correlation utilized a quadratic equation that takes into account the rainfall in a specific area and the rainfall from an adjacent area that contributes through a horizontal flow. Specific values vary from well to well as a result of geometry and underground variations. R2's for the best models ranged up to 0.96. The data in the report references only GSA wells but other wells (including confined water tables) on the site have been observed to return similar water level fluctuation patterns.
Date: August 10, 2009
Creator: Smith, C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Stochastic analysis of well capture zones in heterogeneous porous media

Description: In this study we present a moment-equation-based approach to derive the time-dependent mean capture zones and their associated uncertainties. The flow statistics are obtained by solving the first two moments of flow, and the mean capture zones are determined by reversely tracking the non-reactive particles released at a small circle around each pumping well. The uncertainty associated with the mean capture zones is calculated based on the particle displacement covariance for nonstationary flow fields. For comparison purpose, we also conducted Monte Carlo simulations. It has been found that our model results are in good agreement with Monte Carlo results.
Date: January 1, 2002
Creator: Zhang, D. (Dongxiao) & Lu, Z. (Zhiming)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Surveillance of site A and plot M, report for 2007.

Description: The results of the environmental surveillance program conducted at Site A/Plot M in the Palos Forest Preserve area for Calendar Year 2007 are presented. Based on the results of the 1976-1978 radiological characterization of the site, a determination was made that a surveillance program be established. The characterization study determined that very low levels of hydrogen-3 (as tritiated water) had migrated from the burial ground and were present in two nearby hand pumped picnic wells. The current surveillance program began in 1980 and consists of sample collection and analysis of surface and subsurface water. The results of the analyses are used to: (1) monitor the migration pathway of water from the burial ground (Plot M) to the hand-pumped picnic wells, (2) establish if other buried radionuclides have migrated, and (3) monitor the presence of radioactive materials in the environment of the area. Hydrogen-3 in the Red Gate Woods picnic wells was still detected this year, but the average and maximum concentrations were significantly less than found earlier. Hydrogen-3 continues to be detected in a number of wells, boreholes, dolomite holes, and a surface stream. Analyses since 1984 have indicated the presence of low levels of strontium-90 in water from a number of boreholes next to Plot M. The results of the surveillance program continue to indicate that the radioactivity remaining at Site A/Plot M does not endanger the health or safety of the public visiting the site, using the picnic area, or living in the vicinity.
Date: March 25, 2008
Creator: Golchert, N. W. & Oversight, ESH /QA
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Final work plan : phase II investigation of potential contamination at the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Savannah, Missouri.

Description: From approximately 1949 until 1970, the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) operated a grain storage facility on federally owned property approximately 0.25 mi northwest of Savannah, Missouri (Figure 1.1). During this time, commercial grain fumigants containing carbon tetrachloride were commonly used by the CCC/USDA and the private grain storage industry to preserve grain in their facilities. In November 1998, carbon tetrachloride was detected in a private well (Morgan) roughly 50 ft south of the former CCC/USDA facility, as a result of statewide screening of private wells near former CCC/USDA facilities, conducted in Missouri by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA 1999). The 1998 and subsequent investigations by the EPA and the Missouri Department of Natural Resources (MoDNR) confirmed the presence of carbon tetrachloride in the Morgan well, as well as in a second well (on property currently occupied by the Missouri Department of Transportation [MoDOT]) described as being approximately 400 ft east of the former CCC/USDA facility. The identified concentrations in these two wells were above the EPA maximum contaminant level (MCL) and the Missouri risk-based corrective action default target level (MRBCA DTL) values of 5.0 {micro}g/L for carbon tetrachloride in water used for domestic purposes (EPA 1999; MoDNR 2000a,b, 2006). Because the observed contamination in the Morgan and MoDOT wells might be linked to the past use of carbon tetrachloride-based fumigants at its former grain storage facility, the CCC/USDA is conducting an investigation to (1) characterize the source(s), extent, and factors controlling the subsurface distribution and movement of carbon tetrachloride at Savannah and (2) evaluate the potential risks to human health, public welfare, and the environment posed by the contamination. This work is being performed in accord with the Intergovernmental Agreement established between the Farm Service Agency of the USDA and the MoDNR, to ...
Date: August 16, 2010
Creator: LaFreniere, L. M. & Division, Environmental Science
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

November 2007 monitoring results for Barnes, Kansas.

Description: The Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) formerly operated a grain storage facility (during most of the interval 1949-1974) at Barnes, Kansas. Carbon tetrachloride contamination was initially detected in 1986 in the town's public water supply wells. In 2006-2007, the CCC/USDA conducted a comprehensive targeted investigation at and near its former property in Barnes to investigate this contamination. In November 2007, the CCC/USDA began quarterly groundwater monitoring at Barnes. The monitoring is being conducted on behalf of the CCC/USDA by Argonne National Laboratory, in accord with the recommendations made in the report for the 2006-2007 targeted investigation (Argonne 2007). The objective is to monitor the carbon tetrachloride contamination identified in the groundwater at Barnes. The sampling is presently conducted in a network of 28 individual monitoring wells at 19 distinct locations, 2 public water supply wells, and 1 private well (Figure 1.1). The results of the 2006-2007 targeted investigation demonstrated the presence of carbon tetrachloride contamination at levels slightly exceeding the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) Tier 2 risk-based screening level of 5.0 {micro}g/L for this compound, in a plume that appears to extend from the former CCC/USDA property northwestward, toward the Barnes public water supply wells. Information obtained during the 2006-2007 investigation indicates that at least one other potential source might have contributed to the groundwater contaminant plume (Argonne 2007). The present report presents the results of the November 2007 sampling event that followed the targeted investigation.
Date: February 28, 2008
Creator: LaFreniere, L. M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

October 2008 monitoring results for Barnes, Kansas.

Description: The Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) operated a grain storage facility at Barnes, Kansas, during most of the interval 1949-1974. Carbon tetrachloride contamination was initially detected in 1986 in the town's public water supply wells. In 2006-2007, the CCC/USDA conducted a comprehensive targeted investigation at and near its former property in Barnes to characterize this contamination. Those results were reported previously (Argonne 2008a). In November 2007, the CCC/USDA began quarterly groundwater monitoring at Barnes. The monitoring is being conducted on behalf of the CCC/USDA by Argonne National Laboratory, in accord with the recommendations made in the report for the 2006-2007 targeted investigation (Argonne 2008a). The objective is to monitor the carbon tetrachloride contamination identified in the groundwater at Barnes. The sampling is presently conducted in a network of 28 individual monitoring wells (at 19 distinct locations), 2 public water supply wells, and 1 private well (Figure 1.1). The results of the 2006-2007 targeted investigation and the subsequent monitoring events in November 2007 (Argonne 2008b), March 2008 (Argonne 2008c), and July 2008 (Argonne 2008d) demonstrated the presence of carbon tetrachloride contamination in groundwater at levels exceeding the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) Tier 2 risk-based screening level (RBSL) of 5.0 {micro}g/L for this compound. The contaminant plume appears to extend from the former CCC/USDA property northwestward, toward the Barnes public water supply wells. Information obtained during the 2006-2007 investigations indicates that at least one other potential source might have contributed to the groundwater contaminant plume (Argonne 2008a). The former agriculture building owned by the local school district, located immediately east of well PWS3, is also a potential source of the contamination. This current report presents the results of the fourth monitoring event, conducted in October 2008. During this fourth monitoring event, low-flow sampling methods ...
Date: February 26, 2009
Creator: LaFreniere, L. M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Hydrogeologic investigation and establishment of a permanent multi-observational well network in Aiken, Allendale, and Barnwell Counties, South Carolina. Phase VIII

Description: The Lower Savannah River Project was established in 1986 to improve our understanding of the hydrogeologic conditions in west-central South Carolina. Six progress reports have been written since 1987. This report covers the period from July 1, 1994, to June 30, 1995. During the current phase, work focused on locating and procuring suitable sites for future well clusters; drafting well-construction specifications and bid packages; drilling monitoring wells at site C-7; and completing two comprehensive reports. Land was acquired for three future well-cluster sites: C-11, C-13, and C-15. Site C-11 will be located at the Oakwood Fire Tower in Aiken County. This land was made available through the South Carolina Forestry Commission. Land for site C-13 was donated by the Wildlife Division of the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources and will be located at Little Hell Landing on the Savannah River flood plain southwest of Millet in Allendale County. Site C-15 will be located at Gillisonville in northern Jasper County. A 0.9-acre parcel of land was purchased from Westvaco, Inc., for this site. Well specifications and bid packages were drawn up for the construction of seven monitoring wells at site C-10, three at C-13, and two at C-15. Specific-capacity values of nine wells at site C-7 range from 0.3 to 20.6 gpm/ft (gallons per minute per foot of drawdown). Two deep Cretaceous wells were drilled at site C-7, one each in the Midville and Dublin aquifer systems. An upward hydraulic gradient exists between the aquifers. Two comprehensive reports were completed during this phase of the project: (1) a compilation and interpretation of data collected from the project since its inception in 1986, and (2) a detailed description of the hydrogeologic framework of west-central South Carolina and the hydrologic characteristics of the aquifers and confining units.
Date: February 1, 1996
Creator: Gellici, J.A. & Gawne, C.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Predicting water quality changes from artificial recharge sources to nearby wellfields

Description: Isotope tracer technologies have proven to be powerful tools for addressing questions related to surface water-ground water interactions. The Alameda County Water District artificially recharges tens of thousands of acre-ft of water annually, delivered from Alameda Creek in order to augment dwindling ground water supplies, and to maintain a barrier to seawater intrusion. The authors are using a suite of isotope tracers to track water movement, source characteristics and accompanying water quality changes from ACWD recharge facilities to nearby wells. The data gathered during the three year project will allow quantification of dilution by ambient basin ground water, subsurface travel times, and several key water quality parameters, including degree of degradation of organic compounds, the fate of trace metals during recharge and subsurface transport, and sources and transport of major ions (salts). Reconnaissance work was carried out on naturally occurring isotopes in order to better understand the hydrogeology of the ground water basin. The basin is dissected by the Hayward Fault, and geologic conditions vary greatly on either side of the fault. Stable isotopes of oxygen, carbon, helium and other noble gases, along with radiocarbon and tritium were measured on water samples from production and monitoring wells. The goal of the reconnaissance work was to age date the water at various depths and distances from the recharge ponds, to examine the chemical evolution of the water with age, and to examine the water for source-related variations in isotope composition. Ground water ages were calculated by the tritium-helium method for three production wells in the Peralta-Tyson wellfield (in the Above Hayward Fault sub-basin), and for a monitoring well positioned between the recharge facilities and production wells, screened at three discreet intervals.
Date: January 23, 1998
Creator: Moran, J.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Description of the U.S. Geological Survey`s slug-tests at the Hallam Nuclear Facility, July to November 1994

Description: An aquifer test agreement between the US Department of Energy (USDOE) and the US Geological Survey (USGS) was set up to log and measure the aquifer response in two observation wells, IB and 4C at the Hallam Nuclear Facility, Hallam, Nebraska. Observation wells 1B and 4C are owned by the USDOE and were installed by HWS Technologies Inc. of Lincoln, Nebraska, in June 1993. These observation wells were measured monthly from September 1993 to August 1994 by using a graduated steel tape. The accuracy of these water-level measurements is approximately {plus_minus}0.02 foot. Also well 1B contained a submersible pressure transducer to record hourly water-level data during this same period. During access of the wells, personnel wear clean disposable latex gloves, a hard hat, and safety glasses. Directly following each measurement the steel-tape was rinsed with deionized water and the effluent was disposed of in a 55-gallon drum. For the aquifer tests, observation wells 1B and 4C had submersible pressure transducers installed to monitor water-level responses. These pressure transducers were connected to an electronic data logger (edl) to record the water levels, atmospheric pressure from a barometric pressure gauge, and rainfall data from a tipping-bucket rain gauge. The data recorded on each edl was downloaded onto a field computer during each site visit, processed in the field, and then stored on the USGS`s Data General workstations upon return to the District Office.
Date: January 19, 1995
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Fiscal year 1995 well plugging and abandonment program Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

Description: This report is a synopsis of the progress of the well plugging and abandonment program at the Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, from September 1994 through August 1995. A total of 67 wells, piezometers, and borings were plugged and abandoned during the period of time covered in this report. All wells and borings were plugged and abandoned if (1) its construction did not meet current standards (substandard construction); (2) it was irreparably damaged or had deteriorated beyond practical repair; (3) its location interfered with or otherwise impeded site operations, construction, or closure activities; or (4) special circumstances existed as defined on a case-by-case basis and approved by the Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) Manager. This summary report contains: general geologic setting of the Y-12 Plant and vicinity; discussion of well plugging and abandonment methods, grouting procedures, and waste management practices (a Waste Management Plan for Drilling Activities is included in Appendix C); summaries of plugging and abandonment activities at each site; and quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) and health and safety protocols used during the FY 1995 Plugging and Abandonment Program.
Date: September 1995
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

FY 2002 Integrated Monitoring Plan for the Hanford Groundwater Monitoring Project

Description: This document is an integrated monitoring plan for the groundwater project and contains: well and constituent lists for monitoring required by the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 and its implementing orders (''surveillance monitoring''); other, established monitoring plans by reference; and a master well/ constituent/frequency matrix for the entire Hanford Site.
Date: October 31, 2001
Creator: Hartman, Mary J; Dresel, P Evan; Lindberg, Jon W; Newcomer, Darrell R & Thornton, Edward C
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Geology summary of Waste Area Grouping 5 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

Description: During FY 1994, three multiport wells were installed in Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 5. The wells were instrumented with Westbay multiport systems. The purpose of the wells is (1) to characterize different flow systems and (2) to monitor for contaminants. The geology of the individual boreholes (WAG 5-12, WAG 5-13, WAG 5-14) is documented in Bechtel National, Inc., (BNI) et al. (1994). The Bechtel report does not explicitly show geologic relationships between these boreholes or integrate this information into the geology of WAG 5. The purpose of this report is to document and present a summary of the distribution of geologic formations in WAG 5. This information is presented in several ways: (1) stratigraphic correlation diagrams based on the natural gamma ray log, (2) geologic cross sections, and (3) a geologic map. This work provides a reference frame for interpreting flow, water, and contaminant chemistry data from multiport wells.
Date: August 1, 1996
Creator: Anderson, J.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Report of testing and sampling of municipal supply well PM-4

Description: During drilling of regional aquifer characterization borehole R-25, located in the western part of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) at Technical Area (TA) 16, groundwater samples were collected from perched zones of saturation and the regional aquifer that contained elevated levels of high explosive (HE) compounds. One of the nearest Los Alamos County municipal supply wells potentially located down gradient from borehole R-25 is PM-4, located on Mesita del Buey at the west end of TA-54. During the winter of 1998 and 1999 the pump in PM-4 had been removed from the well for scheduled maintenance by the Los Alamos County Public Utilities Department (PUD). Because the pump was removed from PM-4, the opportunity existed to enter the well to (1) perform tests to determine where within the regional aquifer groundwater entered the well and (2) collect groundwater samples from the producing zones for analyses to determine if HE contaminants were present in discrete zones within the regional aquifer. The report of the activities that were performed during March 1999 for the testing and sampling of municipal supply well PM-4 is provided. The report provides a description of the field activities associated with the two phases of the project, including (1) the results of the static and dynamic spinner log surveys, and (2) a description of the sampling activities and the field-measured groundwater quality parameters that were obtained during sampling activities. This report also provides the analytical results of the groundwater samples and a brief discussion of the results of the project.
Date: December 1, 1999
Creator: Koch, Richard J.; Longmire, Patrick; Rogers, David B. & Mullen, Ken
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Flow-Dimension Analysis of Hydraulic Tests to Characterize Water-Conducting Features

Description: Most analytical solutions and computer codes for well-test analysis assume a radial flow geometry around a well even though actual flow geometries can be quite different particularly in fractured media. Accurate estimation of hydraulic parameters requires knowledge of the flow geometry. Flow dimensions, representing the combined effects of flow geometry and variations in hydraulic properties, em be interpreted from the late-time slope of the pressure derivative on a log-log plot. However, the interpreted flow dimensions could be caused by an infinite number of flow geometry and hydraulic property combinations. Identifying the correct flow geometry so that appropriate hydraulic properties can be calculated is a difficult process, requiring additional information from a variety of sources. Defining a "conservative" model for a system with nonradial flow dimensions is problematic at best. Errors are compounded when hydraulic properties interpreted by force-fitting radial model to tests in nonradial systems are used in flow and transport models that also fail to take proper account of flow geometry. Whatever the flow dimension of a system might be, proper test interpretation and careful model construction, calibration, and testing are required to provide accurate modeling of flow and transport in that system.
Date: November 11, 1998
Creator: Beauheim, R.L. & Roberts, R.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Fiscal Year 1997 Well Installation, Plugging and Abandonment, and Redevelopment Summary Report Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

Description: This report summarizes the well installation, plugging and abandonment and redevelopment activities conducted during the federal fiscal year (FY) 1997 at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. No new groundwater monitoring wells were installed during FY 1997. However, 13 temporary piezometers were installed around the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek (UEFPC) in the Y-12 Plant. An additional 36 temporary piezometers, also reported in this document, were installed in FY 1996 and, subsequently, assigned GW-series identification. A total of 21 monitoring wells at the Y-12 Plant were decommissioned in FY 1997. Three existing monitoring wells underwent redevelopment during FY 1997. All well installation and development (including redevelopment) was conducted following industry-standard methods and approved procedures in the Environmental Surveillance Procedures Quality Control Program (Energy Systems 1988), the {ital Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Groundwater Monitoring Technical Enforcement Guidance Document} (EPA 19?6), and {ital Guidelines for Installation of Monitoring Wells at the Y-12 Plant} (Geraghty & Miller 1985). All wells were plugged and abandoned in accordance with the Monitoring Well Plugging and Abandonment Plan for the U.S. Department of Energy, Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (HSW, Inc. 1991). Health and safety monitoring and field screening of drilling returns and development waters were conducted in accordance with approved Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems) guidelines.
Date: September 1, 1997
Creator: Science Applications International Corporation
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Results of calendar year 1994 monitor well inspection and maintenance program, Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

Description: This document is a compendium of results of the calendar year 1994 Monitor Well Inspection and Maintenance Program at the Department of Energy Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This report documents the work relating to well inspections and maintenance requests. Inspections are implemented in order to better assess the condition and maintenance needs of wells that are actively being monitored. Currently this approach calls for inspecting all wells on a routine (annual or triennial) basis which are: (1) in an active sampling program; (2) included in a hydrologic study; or (3) not in service, but not scheduled for plugging and abandonment. Routine inspections help to ensure that representative groundwater samples and hydrologic data are being collected, and contribute to the life expectancy of each well. This report formally presents well inspection and maintenance activities that were conducted at the Y-12 Plant during 1994. All inspections were conducted between April and December.
Date: June 1, 1995
Creator: McMaster, B.W.; Jones, S.B. & Sitzler, J.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Water supply at Los Alamos during 1992

Description: Municipal potable water supply during 1992 was 1,516 {times} 10{sup 6} gallons from wells in the Guaje and Pajarito well fields. About 13 {times} 10{sup 6} gallons were pumped from the Los Alamos Well Field and used in the construction of State Road 501 adjacent to the Field. The last year the Las Alamos Field was used for municipal supply was 1991. The nonpotable water supply used for steam plant support was about 0.12 {times} 10{sup 6} gallons from the spring gallery in Water Canyon. No nonpotable water was used for irrigation from Guaje and Los Alamos Reservoirs. Thus, the total water usage in 1992 was about 1,529 {times} 10{sup 6} gallons. Neither of the two new wells in the Otowi Well Field were operational in 1992.
Date: September 1, 1995
Creator: Purtymun, W.D.; McLin, S.G.; Stoker, A.K. & Maes, M.N.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Analysis of Well ER-6-2 Testing, Yucca Flat FY 2004 Testing Program, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

Description: This report documents the analysis of data collected for Well ER-6-2 during fiscal year (FY) 2004 Yucca Flat well development and testing program (herein referred to as the ''testing program''). Participants in Well ER-6-2 field development and hydraulic testing activities were: Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture (SNJV), Bechtel Nevada (BN), Desert Research Institute (DRI), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), and the University of Nevada, Las Vegas-Harry Reid Center (UNLV-HRC). The analyses of data collected from the Well ER-6-2 testing program were performed by the SNJV.
Date: July 1, 2005
Creator: Ruskauff, Greg
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Letter Report: Borehole Flow and Horizontal Hydraulic Conductivity with Depth at Well ER-12-4

Description: Borehole flow and fluid temperature during pumping were measured at well ER-12-4 at the Nevada Test Site in Nye County, Nevada. This well was constructed to characterize the carbonate aquifer. The well is cased from land surface to the total depth at 1,132 m (3,713 ft bgs) below ground surface (bgs). The screened section of the well consists of alternating sections of slotted well screen and blank casing from 948 to 1,132 m bgs (3,111 to 3,713 ft bgs). Borehole flow velocity (LT-1) with depth was measured with an impeller flowmeter from the top of the screened section to the maximum accessible depth while the well was pumped and under ambient conditions. A complicating factor to data interpretation is that the well was not filter packed and there is upward and downward vertical flow in the open annulus under ambient and pumping conditions. The open annulus in the well casing likely causes the calculated borehole flow rates being highly nonrepresentative of inflow from the formation. Hydraulic conductivities calculated under these conditions would require unsupportable assumptions and would be subject to very large uncertainties. Borehole hydraulic conductivities are not presented under these conditions.
Date: December 31, 2005
Creator: Oberlander, Phil L. & Russell, Charles E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department