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RCRA ground water assessment plans and annual ground water quality assessment reports at interim status facilities

Description: The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulates waste management activities at hazardous waste management facilities. Whenever a facility becomes subject to regulation under RCRA, the facility owner or operator is required to notify the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) of hazardous waste activity and within 30 days submit the initial ``Part A`` portion of an operating permit application [RCRA {section} 3010] to EPA or to the State authorized to operate a hazardous waste management program in lieu of EPA. A facility that has submitted its Part A application is defined as having ``interim status,`` and is subject to the regulations in 40 CFR Part 265. Interim status facilities that contain hazardous waste landfills, surface impoundments, or land treatment facilities are required by 40 CFR 265 Subpart F to implement a groundwater monitoring program that consists of several phased monitoring activities and is capable of determining the facility`s impact on the quality of ground water in the uppermost aquifer underlying the facility. This information brief is the fourth in a series on the general topic of groundwater monitoring requirements under RCRA at interim status and permitted facilities. This information brief focuses on the last phase of activities, implementation of an Assessment Program, and highlights recordkeeping and reporting requirements.
Date: March 1, 1996
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Engineering report for the central mercury treatment system

Description: Mercury (Hg) was used at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant between 1950 and 1963. This contamination legacy has prompted a series of remedial measures. Since the mid-1980s, a series of engineered projects, maintenance activities, and general improvement in work practices has resulted in a decreasing trend of Hg concentration in East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC). Some of the Hg in the soils surrounding past Hg- use buildings enters the building sumps which are discharged to EFPC. Overall goal is to reduce the Hg contamination of EFPC to no more than 5 g/day. This project will create the Central Mercy Treatment System to reduce the Hg contribution to EFPC by installing carbon adsorption units to treat the effluent from buildings 9201-4, 9201-5, and 9204-4. Use of carbon adsorption will be the long-term strategy for reduction of Hg in plant effluent.
Date: March 1, 1995
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Environmental assessment of remedial action at the Slick Rock uranium mill tailings sites, Slick Rock, Colorado

Description: The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978, hereafter referred to as the UMTRCA, authorized the US Department of Energy (DOE) to clean up two uranium mill tailings processing sites near Slick Rock, Colorado, in San Miguel County. The purpose of the cleanup is to reduce the potential health effects associated with the radioactive materials remaining on the processing sites and on vicinity properties (VPs) associated with the sites. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) promulgated standards for the UMTRCA that contained measures to control the contaminated materials and to protect the ground water from further degradation. The sites contain concrete foundations of mill buildings, tailings piles, and areas contaminated by windblown and waterborne radioactive tailings materials. The proposed action is to remediate the UC and NC sites by removing all contaminated materials within the designated site boundaries or otherwise associated with the sites, and relocating them to, and stabilizing them at, a location approximately 5 road mi (8 km) northeast of the processing sites on land administered by the US Bureau of Land Management (BLM). Remediation would be performed by the DOE`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project.
Date: January 1, 1995
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Evaluation of TVA`s model site and individual technology pollution prevention demonstration programs and their impact on the agrichemical industry

Description: The high volume of fertilizer and pesticides funneled through a relatively small number of distribution outlets has made these agribusiness sites potential sources of surface/groundwater contamination in watersheds surrounding the agrichemical facilities. The agrichemical industry came under increased pressures in the mid-1980s to implement environmentally sound management practices and to install containment structures around fertilizer and chemical storage/handling areas to prevent future contamination of existing sites or the movement of contaminants offsite. TVA`s long and successful history of technology transfer to the retail fertilizer industry, as well as the technical expertise of the Agency`s staff, made TVA ideally suited to handle the new environmental challenge. It was during this time period that TVA`s Model Site Demonstration Program (MSD) and Individual Technology Demonstration Program (ITD) were conceived. Since inception, the pollution prevention program and the technologies advanced by it have made a very positive impact on the US agrichemical industry, as well as on other TVA programs. This paper is an attempt to document these impacts, with primary focus being placed on the program`s impact on the agribusiness dealer who implements the pollution prevention technologies/practices recommended by TVA.
Date: June 1, 1995
Creator: Simpson, G.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Environmental assessment for effluent reduction, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico

Description: The Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to eliminate industrial effluent from 27 outfalls at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The Proposed Action includes both simple and extensive plumbing modifications, which would result in the elimination of industrial effluent being released to the environment through 27 outfalls. The industrial effluent currently going to about half of the 27 outfalls under consideration would be rerouted to LANL`s sanitary sewer system. Industrial effluent from other outfalls would be eliminated by replacing once-through cooling water systems with recirculation systems, or, in a few instances, operational changes would result in no generation of industrial effluent. After the industrial effluents have been discontinued, the affected outfalls would be removed from the NPDES Permit. The pipes from the source building or structure to the discharge point for the outfalls may be plugged, or excavated and removed. Other outfalls would remain intact and would continue to discharge stormwater. The No Action alternative, which would maintain the status quo for LANL`s outfalls, was also analyzed. An alternative in which industrial effluent would be treated at the source facilities was considered but dismissed from further analysis because it would not reasonably meet the DOE`s purpose for action, and its potential environmental effects were bounded by the analysis of the Proposed Action and the No Action alternatives.
Date: September 11, 1996
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Meeting NPDES permit limits for an effluent-dependent stream

Description: When the Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina received a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit containing very low copper and toxicity limits for an effluent-dependent stream, an innovative and cost-effective method to meet them was sought. The South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control mandated that compliance with the new limits be achieved within three years of the effective date of the permit. SRS personnel studied various regulatory options for complying with the new limits including Water Effect Ratio, use of a Metals Translator, blending with additional effluents, and outfall relocation. Regulatory options were determined to not be feasible because the receiving stream is effluent dependent. Treatment options were studied after it was determined that none of the regulatory pathways were viable. Corrosion inhibitors were evaluated on a full-scale basis with only limited benefits. Ion exchange was promising, but not cost effective for a high flow effluent with a very low concentration of copper. A treatment wetlands, not normally given consideration for the removal of metals, proved to be the most cost effective method studied and is currently under construction.
Date: September 1, 1998
Creator: Payne, W.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Biological monitoring and abatement program plan for Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Description: The overall purpose of this plan is to evaluate the receiving streams` biological communities for the duration of the permit and meet the objectives for the ORNL BMAP as outlined in the NPDES permit (Appendix). The ORNL BMAP will focus on those streams in the WOC watershed that (1) receive NPDES discharges and (2) have been identified as ecologically impacted. In response to the newly issued NPDES permit, the tasks that are included in this BMAP plan include monitoring biological communities (fish and benthic invertebrates), monitoring mercury contamination in fish and water, monitoring polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) contamination in fish, and evaluating temperature loading from ORNL outfalls. The ORNL BMAP will evaluate the effects of sediment and oil and grease, as well as the chlorine control strategy through the use of biological community data. Monitoring will be conducted at sites in WOC, First Creek, Fifth Creek, Melton Branch, and WOL.
Date: June 1997
Creator: Kszos, L. A.; Anderson, G. E.; Gregory, S. M.; Peterson, M. J.; Ryon, M. G.; Schilling, E. M. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Y-12 Industrial Landfill V. Permit application modifications

Description: This report contains the modifications in operations and design to meet the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conversation (TDEC) July 10, 1993, amendments to the regulations for Class 2 landfills. These modifications, though extensive in design and construction cost, are considered minor revisions and should not require a processing fee. Area 1 of ILF V, comprising approximately 20% of the ILF V footprint, was designed and submitted to TDEC prior to the implementation of current regulations. This initial area was constructed with a compacted clay liner and leachate collection system, and became operational in April 1994. The current regulations require landfills to have a composite liner with leachate collection system and closure cap. Modifications to upgrade Areas 2 and 3 of ILF V to meet the current TDEC requirements are included.
Date: September 1, 1995
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Solubilization of trace organics in block copolymer micelles for environmental separation using membrane extraction principles. Final report, May 1, 1992--April 30, 1995

Description: The solubilization of a range of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in block copolymer micelles has been studied as a function of polymer composition, architecture, and temperature. Micelle formation is favored at high temperatures, leading to significant enhancements in solubilization capacity. At low temperatures, however, micelles do not form and the solubilization capacity of the block copolymer solution for the organics is low; this provides a convenient method for the regeneration of micellar solutions used as solvents in the treatment of contaminated feed streams using membrane extraction principles. Other experiments and analysis point to the effectiveness of block copolymer micellar solutions as water-based adsorbents for the removal of trace organics from air streams. Theoretical calculations of the structure of block copolymer micelles in the presence and absence of solutes using self-consistent mean-field lattice theories and lattice Monte Carlo methods have successfully captured the trends observed with changing polymer composition and architecture, often quantitatively. The temperature and composition dependence of the micellar properties were determined by allowing the individual polymer segments to assume both polar and non-polar conformations.
Date: September 1, 1998
Creator: Hatton, T. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Control of water infiltration into near surface LLW disposal units. Progress report on field experiments at a humid region site, Beltsville, Maryland: Volume 8

Description: This study`s objective is to assess means for controlling water infiltration through waste disposal unit covers in humid regions. Experimental work is being performed in large-scale lysimeters 21.34 m x 13.72 m x 3.05 m (75 ft x 45 ft x 10 ft) at Beltsville, Maryland. Results of the assessment are applicable to disposal of low-level radioactive waste (LLW), uranium mill tailings, hazardous waste, and sanitary landfills. Three kinds of waste disposal unit covers or barriers to water infiltration are being investigated: (1) resistive layer barrier, (2) conductive layer barrier, and (3) bioengineering management. The resistive layer barrier consists of compacted earthen material (e.g., clay). The conductive layer barrier consists of a conductive layer in conjunction with a capillary break. As long as unsaturated flow conditions are maintained, the conductive layer will wick water around the capillary break. Below-grade layered covers such as (1) and (2) will fail if there is appreciable subsidence of the cover, and remedial action for this kind of failure will be difficult. A surface cover, called bioengineering management, is meant to overcome this problem. The bioengineering management surface barrier is easily repairable if damaged by subsidence; therefore, it could be the system of choice under active subsidence conditions. The bioengineering management procedure also has been shown to be effective in dewatering saturated trenches and could be used for remedial action efforts. After cessation of subsidence, that procedure could be replaced by a resistive layer barrier or, perhaps even better, by a resistive layer barrier/conductive layer barrier system. The latter system would then give long-term effective protection against water entry into waste without institutional care.
Date: April 1, 1995
Creator: Schulz, R.K.; Ridky, R.W. & O`Donnell, E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Acid mine drainage prevention, control and treatment technology development for the Stockett/Sand Coulee area. Topical report, March 1, 1995--March 31, 1996

Description: The project was initiated to assist the State of Montana to develop a methodology to ameliorate acid mine drainage problems associated with the abandoned mines located in the Stockett/Sand Coulee area near Great Falls, Montana. Extremely acidic water is continuously discharging from abandoned coal mines in the Stockett/Sand Coulee area at an estimated rate of greater than 600 acre-feet per year (about 350 to 400 gallons per minute). Due to its extreme acidity, the water is unusable and is contaminating other water supplies. Most of the local alluvial aquifers have been contaminated, and nearly 5% of the private wells that were tested in the area during the mid-1980`s showed some degree of contamination. Significant government money has been spent replacing water supplies due to the magnitude of this problem. In addition, millions of dollars have been spent trying to remediate acid mine drainage occurring in this coal field. To date, the techniques used have focused on the management and containment of mine waters, rather than designing technologies that would prevent the formation of acid mine drainage.
Date: December 31, 1996
Creator: Brown, T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The subsurface hydrology around Building 9201-2: Results of the July 1994 water level recovery test, Oak Ridge Y-12 plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

Description: A water level recovery test was conducted at Building 9201-2 at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, from 12:45 p.m. on July 29 until 8:22 a.m. on July 31, 1994. The purpose of the test was to improve the general understanding of the subsurface hydrology around the building. The information is needed to determine the minimum pumping capacity necessary to maintain safe water levels in the basement of the building and to assist in designing systems for treating mercury-bearing waters in the basement. The test was initiated by shutting off the three main sump pumps in Building 9201-2 (i.e., O-12, E-13, and E-22) for 43.5 hr and allowing the water in the basement to approach a static level. The pumps in sumps F-3 and P-6 were also not operating during the test. During the test, water levels were monitored in 5 sumps (P-6, O-12, F-3, E-13, and E-22); a pit near sump K-22; 4 monitoring wells or piezometers in the basement near the O-12 sump, and 16 wells outside of the building. Sump K-22 was dry during the entire test.
Date: June 1, 1996
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

State of the hydrologic source term

Description: The Underground Test Area (UGTA) Operable Unit was defined by the U.S. Department of energy, Nevada operations Office to characterize and potentially remediate groundwaters impacted by nuclear testing at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Between 1955 and 1992, 828 nuclear devices were detonated underground at the NTS (DOE), 1994. Approximately one third of the nuclear tests were detonated at or below the standing water table and the remainder were located above the water table in the vadose zone. As a result, the distribution of radionuclides in the subsurface and, in particular, the availability of radionuclides for transport away from individual test cavities are major concerns at the NTS. The approach taken is to carry out field-based studies of both groundwaters and host rocks within the near-field in order to develop a detailed understanding of the present-day concentration and spatial distribution of constituent radionuclides. Understanding the current distribution of contamination within the near-field and the conditions under and processes by which the radionuclides were transported make it possible to predict future transport behavior. The results of these studies will be integrated with archival research, experiments and geochemical modeling for complete characterization.
Date: December 1, 1996
Creator: Kersting, A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Pollution prevention assessment for a printed circuit board plant

Description: The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has funded a pilot project to assist small and medium-size manufacturers who want to minimize their generation of waste but who lack the expertise to do so. In an effort to assist these manufacturers Waste Minimization Assessment Centers (WMACs) were established at selected universities and procedures were adapted from the EPA Waste Minimization Opportunity Assessment Manual. The WMAC team at Colorado State University performed an assessment at a plant that manufacturers printed circuit boards. Templates for the circuit design are generated from customer-supplied circuit information. Copper/epoxy laminates and copper foil are cut into blank boards and layers. Circuit patterns are generated through a series of photolithographic and plating processes. The team`s report, detailing findings and recommendations, indicated that the onsite ion-exchange treatment of metal-containing rinse water generates regenerant solutions that could be further treated by electrowinning to recover metals and to achieve significant cost savings. This Research Brief was developed by the principal investigators and EPA`s National Risk Management Research Laboratory, Cincinnati, OH, to announce key findings of an ongoing research project that is fully documented in a separate report of the same title available from University City Science Center.
Date: September 1, 1995
Creator: Edwards, H.W.; Kostrzewa, M.F. & Looby, G.P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Estimating the economic impact of environmental investments on retail costs and dealer strategies for offsetting these costs

Description: Retail agrichemical dealers have become increasingly familiar with the concept of containment over the past several years. Currently, containment regulations are in place in 13 states, and are being drafted in 7 others. Agrichemical dealers in these states will be required to assess the potential environmental impact of their operating practices on the land under and around the retail production site. A recent survey of TVA model site and individual technology demonstration dealers attempted to gain insight into the impact these investments in containment structures, changing operating practices, and state containment regulations were having on annual production costs. The purpose of this paper is to (1) provide the agrichemical dealer a methodology for quickly estimating the potential impact that environmental investments will have on annual production costs, and (2) to evaluate the effectiveness of alternative management strategies employed to offset some, or in some cases, all of these additional costs.
Date: September 1, 1995
Creator: Simpson, G.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The circulating air barrier: Effective prevention of liquid contaminant movement through soil

Description: Objectives of this task included design, modeling, selection of drilling and surface processing equipment, and development of test procedures and cost estimates for conducting a cold test demonstration of the Circulating Air Barrier (CAB) process. The demonstration configuration is scaled to a prototype CAB system designed specifically for the C Tank Farm at the Hanford Site. The CAB system is designed to function as a containment barrier to prevent contamination of the water table located approximately 200 feet below the base of the C-Tank-Farm underground storage tanks. The CAB system is a desiccant-type barrier designed to prevent the migration of liquid contaminants toward the ground water by using an air circulation and processing system to lower the saturation in a targeted subsurface zone below the saturation level required for liquid flow through that zone. The CAB system offers several important advantages, including the fact that it is a non-physical confinement technology, it has an active monitoring and leak detection capability, it is based on proven, commercially available equipment and oil and gas technologies; it has excellent potential for emergency response and rapid deployment; and offers high potential for integration with other remediation technologies. Demonstration- and full-scale CAB systems have been designed for the Hanford Site as part of this task.
Date: December 1994
Creator: Towers, T. & Overbey, W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Pollution prevention assessment for a manufacturer of food service equipment

Description: The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has funded a pilot project to assist small and medium-size manufacturers who want to minimize their generation of waste but who lack the expertise to do so. In an effort to assist these manufacturers Waste Minimization Assessment Centers (WMACs) were established at selected universities and procedures were adapted from the EPA Waste Minimization Opportunity Assessment Manual. The WMAC team at Colorado State University performed an assessment at a plant that manufacturers commercial food service equipment. Raw materials used by the plant include stainless steel, mild steel, aluminum, and copper and brass. Operations performing in the plant include cutting, forming, bending, welding, polishing, painting, and assembly The team`s report, detailing findings and recommendations, indicated that paint-related wastes (organic solvents) are generated in large quantities and that significant cost savings could be achieved by retrofitting the water curtain paint spray booth to operate as a dry filter paint booth. Toluene could be replaced by a less toxic solvent. This Research Brief was developed by the principal investigators and EPA`s National Risk Management Research Laboratory, Cincinnati, OH, to announce key findings of an ongoing research project that is fully documented in a separate report of the same title available from University City Science Center.
Date: September 1, 1995
Creator: Edwards, H.W.; Kostrzewa, M.F. & Looby, G.P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Pollution prevention assessment for a metal parts coater

Description: The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has funded a pilot project to assist small and medium-size manufacturers who want to minimize their generation of waste but who lack the expertise to do so. In an effort to assist these manufacturers Waste Minimization Assessment Centers (WMACs) were established at selected universities and procedures were adapted from the EPA Waste Minimization Opportunity Assessment Manual. The WMAC team at Colorado State University performed an assessment at a plant that applies corrosion resistant coatings to metal parts. Aluminum parts received from customers may be anodized or may receive a chromate conversion coating. Brass, copper, steel, and aluminum parts from customers are nickel plated--either by electrolytic or electroless plating. The assessment team`s report, detailing findings and recommendations, indicated that large quantities of wastewater and metal sludge are generated by the plant and that significant cost savings could be achieved through replacement of Freon used for degreasing. This Research Brief was developed by the principal investigators and EPA`s National Risk Management Research Laboratory, Cincinnati, OH, to announce key findings of an ongoing research project that is fully documented in a separate report of the same title available from University City Science Center.
Date: September 1, 1995
Creator: Edwards, H.W.; Kostrzewa, M.F.; Spika, T. & Looby, G.P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Pollution prevention assessment for a manufacturer of electrical load centers

Description: The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has funded a pilot project to assist small and medium-size manufacturers who want to minimize their generation of waste but who lack the expertise to do so. In an effort to assist these manufacturers Waste Minimization Assessment Centers (WMACs) were established at selected universities and procedures were adapted from the EPA Waste Minimization Opportunity Assessment Manual. The WMAC team at the University of Tennessee performed an assessment at a plant that manufacturers electrical load centers. Raw materials, including coiled sheet steel and coiled copper strips, polystyrene pellets, and miscellaneous fasteners, are used in metal-working, injection molding, painting, and assembly operations. The team`s report, detailed findings and recommendations, indicated that a large quantity of waste overflow rinse water is generated and that significant cost savings could be achieved by installing valves that will allow operators to turn off the flow during periods of nonuse. This Research Brief was developed by the principal investigators and EPA`s National Risk Management Research Laboratory, Cincinnati, OH, to announce key findings of an ongoing research project that is fully documented in a separate report of the same title available from University City Science Center.
Date: September 1, 1995
Creator: Jendrucko, R.J.; Thomas, T.M. & Looby, G.P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Pollution prevention assessment for a manufacturer of wooden cabinets

Description: The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has funded a pilot project to assist small and medium-size manufacturers who want to minimize their generation of waste but who lack the expertise to do so. In an effort to assist these manufacturers Waste Minimization Assessment Centers (WMACs) were established at selected universities and procedures were adapted from the EPA Waste Minimization Opportunity Assessment Manual (EPA/625/7-88/003, July 1988). That document has been superseded by the Facility Pollution Prevention Guide (EPA/600/R-92/088, May 1992). The WMAC team at Colorado state University performed an assessment at a plant that manufacturers wooden kitchen and bathroom cabinets. Components purchased from vendors are prepared for production through cutting, sanding, and routing operations. Stain, sealer, and top-coat are applied in separate spray booths. After the final coating, the components are dried and assembled. The assessment team`s report, detailing findings and recommendations, indicated that paint sludge from the spray booth water curtains is generated in a large amount and that significant cost savings could be achieved by dewatering the sludge before it is shipped offsite for disposal and reusing the water. This Research Brief was developed by the principal investigators and EPA`s National Risk Management Research Laboratory, Cincinnati, OH, to announce key findings of an ongoing research project that is fully documented in a separate report of the same title available from University City Science Center.
Date: September 1, 1995
Creator: Edwards, H.W.; Kostrzewa, M.F. & Looby, G.P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Pollution prevention assessment for a manufacturer of gear cases for outboard motors

Description: The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has funded a pilot project to assist small and medium-size manufacturers who want to minimize their generation of waste but who lack the expertise to do so. In an effort to assist these manufacturers Waste Minimization Assessment Centers (WMACs) were established at selected universities and procedures were adapted from the EPA Waste Minimization Opportunity Assessment Manual. The WMAC team at the University of Tennessee performed an assessment at a plant that manufacturers gear cases for outboard motors. Aluminum castings are machined and polished, and undergo chemical immersion, chromate conversion, and, in some cases, painting. Steel castings are machined, heat treated, shot-peened offsite, deburred, and ground. The finished component parts are assembled together. The team`s report, detailing findings and recommendations, indicated that absorbent socks and leaked oil and coolant are generated in large quantities, and that significant cost savings could be achieved by eliminating the use of the absorbent socks by constructing containment areas around the machines. This Research Brief was developed by the principal investigators and EPA`s National Risk Management Research Laboratory, Cincinnati, OH, to announce key findings of an ongoing research project that is fully documented in a separate report of the same title available from University City Science Center.
Date: September 1, 1995
Creator: Jendrucko, R.J.; Myers, J.A. & Looby, G.P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Pollution prevention assessment for a manufacturer of combustion engine piston rings

Description: The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has funded a pilot project to assist small and medium-size manufacturers who want to minimize their generation of waste but who lack the expertise to do so. In an effort to assist these manufacturers Waste Minimization Assessment Centers (WMACs) were established at selected universities and procedures were adapted from the EPA Waste Minimization Opportunity Assessment Manual. The WMAC team at the University of Tennessee performed an assessment at a plant that manufactures piston rings. Steel and iron rings are machined, chrome-plated or coated, machined again, cleaned, and shipped to customers. The assessment team`s report, detailing findings and recommendations, indicated that wastewater and wastewater treatment sludge are the waste streams generated in greatest quantity and that the greatest cost savings could be achieved by modifying the method of masking the rings prior to chrome plating. This Research Brief was developed by the principal investigators and EPA`s National Risk Management Research Laboratory, Cincinnati, OH, to announce key findings of an ongoing research project that is fully documented in a separate report of the same title available from University City Science Center.
Date: August 1, 1995
Creator: Jendrucko, R.J.; Thomas, T.M. & Looby, G.P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Pollution prevention assessment for a manufacturer of power supplies

Description: The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has funded a pilot project to assist small and medium-size manufacturers who want to minimize their generation of waste but who lack the expertise to do so. In an effort to assist these manufacturers Waste Minimization Assessment Centers (WMACs) were established at selected universities and procedures were adapted from the EPA Waste Minimization Opportunity Assessment Manual. The WMAC team at Colorado State University performed an assessment at a plant that manufacturers power supplies from printed circuit boards and electronic components. Through-hole components are attached to the boards using a wave soldering machine. Surface-mounted components are mounted onto the boards which are then combined with cases, frames, and other prefabricated parts to form power supplies. The product is then tested and shipped. The assessment team`s report, detailing findings and recommendations, indicated that waste cooling water is generated in large quantities in the testing and burn-in area, and that significant cost savings could be achieved through the installation of a closed-loop cooling system. This Research Brief was developed by the principal investigators and EPA`s National Risk Management Research Laboratory, Cincinnati, OH, to announce key findings of an ongoing research project that is fully documented in a separate report of the same title available from University City Science Center.
Date: September 1, 1995
Creator: Edwards, H.W.; Kostrzewa, M.F. & Looby, G.P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department