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Nevada National Security Site 2011 Waste Management Monitoring Report, Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site

Description: Environmental monitoring data are collected at and around the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). These data are associated with radiation exposure, air, groundwater, meteorology, and vadose zone. This report summarizes the 2011 environmental data to provide an overall evaluation of RWMS performance and to support environmental compliance and performance assessment (PA) activities. Some of these data (e.g., radiation exposure, air, and groundwater) are presented in other reports. Direct radiation monitoring data indicate exposure levels at the RWMSs are within the range of background levels measured at the NNSS. Slightly elevated exposure levels outside the Area 3 RWMS are attributed to nearby historical aboveground nuclear weapons tests. Air monitoring data show tritium concentrations in water vapor and americium and plutonium concentrations in air particles are only slightly above detection limits and background levels. The measured levels of radionuclides in air particulates and moisture are below derived concentration guides for these radionuclides. During the last 2 weeks of March 2011, gamma spectroscopy results for air particles showed measurable activities of iodine-131 (131I), cesium-134 (134Cs), and cesium-137 (137Cs). These results are attributed to the release of fission products from the damaged Fukushima Daiichi power plant in Japan. The remaining gamma spectroscopy results for air particulates collected at the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMS were below minimum detectable concentrations. Groundwater monitoring data indicate the groundwater in the uppermost aquifer beneath the Area 5 RWMS is not impacted by RWMS operations. Results of groundwater analysis from wells around the Area 5 RWMS were all below established investigation levels. The 86.3 millimeters (mm) (3.40 inches [in.]) of precipitation at the Area 3 RWMS during 2011 is 44% below the average of 154.1 mm (6.07 in.), and the 64.8 mm (2.55 in.) of precipitation …
Date: July 31, 2012
Creator: National Security Technologies, LLC
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Application of different levels of simulation to solid waste management systems

Description: Simulation techniques can be effectively applied to solid waste management systems, as an aid to understanding and analyzing existing systems or as part of the planning and design of new systems. Analysis of these systems using simulations can proceed at various levels of detail, depending on particular needs of the analysis (i.e., the questions for which answers are sought). This paper discusses the major system dimension variables for simulation of solid waste management systems, and how they can be related to each other to plan or understand a solid waste management system. Examples of the simulations at different levels of detail are included. In addition, the selection of appropriate simulation tools is addressed.
Date: November 1, 1993
Creator: Holter, G. M.; Shaver, S. R.; Armacost, L. L. & Ross, T. L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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ICDF Complex Operations Waste Management Plan

Description: This Waste Management Plan functions as a management and planning tool for managing waste streams generated as a result of operations at the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF) Complex. The waste management activities described in this plan support the selected remedy presented in the Waste Area Group 3, Operable Unit 3-13 Final Record of Decision for the operation of the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility Complex. This plan identifies the types of waste that are anticipated during operations at the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility Complex. In addition, this plan presents management strategies and disposition for these anticipated waste streams.
Date: December 1, 2006
Creator: Heileson, W.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Waste Management Quality Assurance Plan

Description: The WMG QAP is an integral part of a management system designed to ensure that WMG activities are planned, performed, documented, and verified in a manner that assures a quality product. A quality product is one that meets all waste acceptance criteria, conforms to all permit and regulatory requirements, and is accepted at the offsite treatment, storage, and disposal facility. In addition to internal processes, this QA Plan identifies WMG processes providing oversight and assurance to line management that waste is managed according to all federal, state, and local requirements for waste generator areas. A variety of quality assurance activities are integral to managing waste. These QA functions have been identified in the relevant procedures and in subsequent sections of this plan. The WMG QAP defines the requirements of the WMG quality assurance program. These requirements are derived from Department of Energy (DOE) Order 414.1C, Quality Assurance, Contractor Requirements Document, the LBNL Operating and Assurance Program Plan (OAP), and other applicable environmental compliance documents. The QAP and all associated WMG policies and procedures are periodically reviewed and revised, as necessary, to implement corrective actions, and to reflect changes that have occurred in regulations, requirements, or practices as a result of feedback on work performed or lessons learned from other organizations. The provisions of this QAP and its implementing documents apply to quality-affecting activities performed by the WMG; WMG personnel, contractors, and vendors; and personnel from other associated LBNL organizations, except where such contractors, vendors, or organizations are governed by their own WMG-approved QA programs.
Date: August 14, 2006
Creator: Group, Waste Management
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Review of issues relevant to acceptable risk criteria for nuclear waste management

Description: Development of acceptable risk criteria for nuclear waste management requires the translation of publicly determined goals and objectives into definitive issues which, in turn, require resolution. Since these issues are largely of a subjective nature, they cannot be resolved by technological methods. Development of acceptable risk criteria might best be accomplished by application of a systematic methodology for the optimal implementation of subjective values. Multi-attribute decision analysis is well suited for this purpose.
Date: February 22, 1978
Creator: Cohen, J.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Critical review of solid radioactive waste practices at nuclear power plants

Description: Results of a survey made of solid radioactive waste (radwaste) practices at light-water-cooled nuclear power plants are presented. Plant operating reports from initial criticality to December 31, 1972, were the main sources of information. A comparison of boiling water reactors (BWRs) and pressurized water reactors (PWRs) shows that BWRs consistently shipped a larger total volume of solid radwaste per thermal megawatt-hour than PWRs. (TFD)
Date: March 1, 1974
Creator: Kibbey, A. H. & Godbee, H. W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Exploring opportunities for working together in the Pacific Northwest to solve solid waste problems

Description: Industry, state and local government, university, and US Department of Energy national laboratory representatives gathered in September 1993 to discuss ways to reduce environmental impacts of municipal and industrial waste. First day focused on industry and local government perspectives regarding problems they are facing relative to managing solid waste, minimizing waste generation during production of goods and services, and utilizing secondary materials in production. Included in discussions were technologies currently employed in the marketplace and future technology development and/or needed policy changes. Second day focused on approaches that various industry and governmental sectors are taking to develop solutions. Strategies for establishing a regional partnership were discussed.
Date: November 1, 1993
Creator: Stapp, D. C. & Khawaja, A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Nevada National Security Site 2010 Waste Management Monitoring Report Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites

Description: Environmental monitoring data were collected at and around the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). These data are associated with radiation exposure, air, groundwater, meteorology, vadose zone, subsidence, and biota. This report summarizes the 2010 environmental data to provide an overall evaluation of RWMS performance and to support environmental compliance and performance assessment (PA) activities. Some of these data (e.g., radiation exposure, air, and groundwater) are presented in other reports (National Security Technologies, LLC, 2010a; 2010b; 2011). Direct radiation monitoring data indicate exposure levels at the RWMSs are within the range of background levels measured at the NNSS. Air monitoring data at the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMSs indicate that tritium concentrations are slightly above background levels. All gamma spectroscopy results for air particulates collected at the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMS were below the minimum detectable concentrations, and concentrations of americium and plutonium are only slightly above detection limits. The measured levels of radionuclides in air particulates and moisture are below derived concentration guides for these radionuclides. Groundwater monitoring data indicate that the groundwater in the uppermost aquifer beneath the Area 5 RWMS is not impacted by facility operations. The 246.9 millimeters (mm) (9.72 inches [in.]) of precipitation at the Area 3 RWMS during 2010 is 56 percent above the average of 158.7 mm (6.25 in.), and the 190.4 mm (7.50 in.) of precipitation at the Area 5 RWMS during 2010 is 50 percent above the average of 126.7 mm (4.99 in.). Soil-gas tritium monitoring at borehole GCD-05 continues to show slow subsurface migration consistent with previous results. Water balance measurements indicate that evapotranspiration from the vegetated weighing lysimeter dries the soil and prevents downward percolation of precipitation more effectively than evaporation from the bare-soil weighing …
Date: June 1, 2011
Creator: National Security Technologies, LLC
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Report of the AD HOC Study Group on integrated versus dispersed fuel cycle facilities

Description: To provide isolation of strategic materials and confinement of nuclear wastes, the basic facilities considered in assessing the DFCF and IFCF were mixed plutonium and uranium oxide and HTGR fuel fabrication, fuel reprocessing, high- enrichment isotopic separation and interim waste storage. Reactors, low- enrichment isotopic separation, and low-enrichment uranium facilities were excluded. It is expected that the IFCF would attract uranium fuel fabrication and possibly reactors. An assumption was made for the study that the choice of either IFCF or DFCF would not alter the nuclear power generation pattern postulated to exist up to the year 2000. The advantages of IFCF are seen to outweigh disadvantages. (auth)
Date: April 1, 1975
Creator: Kreiter, M. R. & Platt, A. M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Risk assessment and radioactive waste management

Description: Problems associated with radioactive waste management, both technological and administrative, have become a serious constraint in the development of nuclear power. An approach toward understanding these problems consists of placing them in a perspective where the risks of radioactive waste management might be evaluated in relation to similar problems facing society so that consistent judgments can be made.
Date: August 16, 1977
Creator: Cohen, J.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Energy implications of recycling packaging materials

Description: In 1992, Congress sought to rewrite the United States comprehensive solid waste legislation -- the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Commodity-specific recycling rates were proposed for consumer-goods packaging materials and newsprint We compare the impacts on energy, materials use, and landfill volume of recycling at those rates to the impacts for alternative methods of material disposition to determine the optimum for each material. After products have served their intended uses, there are several alternative paths for material disposition. These include reuse, recycling to the same product, recycling to a lower-valued product, combustion for energy recovery, incineration without energy recovery, and landfill. Only options considered to be environmentally sound are Included. Both houses of Congress specifically excluded combustion for energy recovery from counting towards the recovery goats, probably because combustion is viewed as a form of disposal and is therefore assumed to waste resources and have n environmental effects. However, co-combustion in coal-fired plants or combustion in appropriately pollution-controlled waste-to-energy plants Is safe, avoids landfill costs, and can displace fossil fuels. In some cases, more fossil fuels can be displaced by combustion than by recycling. We compare the alternative life-cycle energies to the energies for producing the products from virgin materials. Results depend on the material and on the objective to be achieved. There are trade-offs among possible goals. For instance, paper packaging recycling conserves trees but may require greater fossil-fuel input than virgin production. Therefore, the objectives for proposed legislation must be examined to see whether they can most effectively be achieved by mandated recycling rates or by other methods of disposition. The optimal choices for the United States may not necessarily be the same as those for Europe and other parts of the world.
Date: March 1, 1994
Creator: Gaines, L. L. & Stodolsky, F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Operable Unit 3-13, Group 3, Other Surface Soils Remediation Sets 4-6 (Phase II) Waste Management Plan

Description: This Waste Management Plan describes waste management and waste minimization activities for Group 3, Other Surface Soils Remediation Sets 4-6 (Phase II) at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center located within the Idaho National Laboratory. The waste management activities described in this plan support the selected response action presented in the Final Record of Decision for Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, Operable Unit 3-13. This plan identifies the waste streams that will be generated during implementation of the remedial action and presents plans for waste minimization, waste management strategies, and waste disposition.
Date: July 1, 2006
Creator: Schwendiman, G. L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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TRA Closure Plan REV 0-9-20-06 HWMA/RCRA Closure Plan for the TRA/MTR Warm Waste System Voluntary Consent Order SITE-TANK-005 Tank System TRA-007

Description: This Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act closure plan was developed for portions of the Test Reactor Area/Materials Test Reactor Warm Waste System located in the Materials Test Reactor Building (TRA-603) at the Reactor Technology Complex, Idaho National Laboratory Site, to meet a further milestone established under Voluntary Consent Order Action Plan SITE-TANK-005 for Tank System TRA-007. The reactor drain tank and canal sump to be closed are included in the Test Reactor Area/Materials Test Reactor Warm Waste System. The reactor drain tank and the canal sump were characterized as having managed hazardous waste. The reactor drain tank and canal sump will be closed in accordance with the interim status requirements of the Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act as implemented by the Idaho Administrative Procedures Act 58.01.05.009 and 40 Code of Federal Regulations 265. This closure plan presents the closure performance standards and methods for achieving those standards.
Date: January 31, 2007
Creator: Winterholler, K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Program functionality and information analysis

Description: The Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) is executing a plan for improvement of the United States Nuclear Waste Management Program. As part of the plan, OCRWM is performing a systems engineering analysis of both the physical system, i.e., the Nuclear Waste Management System (NWMS), and the programmatic functions that must be accomplished to bring the physical system into being. The functional analysis effort is being performed by two separate teams working in parallel, one of which addresses the physical system functions and the other the programmatic functions. This paper presents information on the analysis of the programmatic functions.
Date: April 1, 1992
Creator: Woods, T.W. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)) & Shipler, D.B. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States))
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Nevada Test Site, 2006 Waste Management Monitoring Report, Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites

Description: Environmental monitoring data were collected at and around the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) at the Nevada Test Site. These data are associated with radiation exposure, air, groundwater, meteorology, vadose zone, subsidence, and biota. This report summarizes the 2006 environmental data to provide an overall evaluation of RWMS performance and to support environmental compliance and performance assessment (PA) activities. Some of these data (e.g., radiation exposure, air, and groundwater) are presented in other reports (U.S. Department of Energy, 2006; Warren and Grossman, 2007; National Security Technologies, LLC, 2007). Direct radiation monitoring data indicate that exposure levels around the RWMSs are at or below background levels. Air monitoring data at the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMSs indicate that tritium concentrations are slightly above background levels. There is no detectable man-made radioactivity by gamma spectroscopy, and concentrations of americium and plutonium are only slightly above detection limits at the Area 3 RWMS. Measurements at the Area 5 RWMS show that radon flux from waste covers is no higher than natural radon flux from undisturbed soil in Area 5. Groundwater monitoring data indicate that the groundwater in the uppermost aquifer beneath the Area 5 RWMS is not impacted by facility operations. Precipitation during 2006 totaled 98.6 millimeters (mm) (3.9 inches [in.]) at the Area 3 RWMS and 80.7 mm (3.2 in.) at the Area 5 RWMS. Soil-gas tritium monitoring continues to show slow subsurface migration consistent with previous results. Moisture from precipitation at Area 5 remains at the bottom of the bare-soil weighing lysimeter, but this same moisture has been removed from the vegetated weighing lysimeter by evapotranspiration. Vadose zone data from the operational waste pit covers show that evaporation continues to slowly remove soil moisture that came from the heavy precipitation in the fall of 2004 …
Date: June 30, 2007
Creator: Hudson, David B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Purpose of the Materials Characterization Center

Description: The Materials Characterization Center (MCC) at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory is the experimental arm of the Materials Characterization Organization (MCO), which was established by the US Department of Energy (DOE) in FY 1980 to ensure high quality characterization and qualification of waste package materials essential to the reliable performance of DOE nuclear waste management programs. MCC is responsible for publishing key test methods and data in the Nuclear Waste Materials Handbook (DOE/TIC-11400). It sponsors a continuing series of workshops that address materials characterization test method issues. It supplies well-characterized reference and testing materials for use by the DOE nuclear waste management programs. It develops generic test methods and supports the repository waste package projects in developing selected site-specific test methods and performing confirmatory testing of these methods. When these test methods are approved by the MRB they constitute the formal tests to be used by laboratories to test and qualify materials, evaluate waste package components, and assure compliance with standards and/or specifications for the final product.
Date: September 1, 1984
Creator: Mendel, J. E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Issues and scenarios for nuclear waste management systems analysis

Description: The Planning and Analysis Branch of the Department of Energy's Nuclear Waste Management Programs is developing a new systems integration program. The Pacific Northwest Laboratory was requested to perform a brief scoping analysis of what scenarios, questions, and issues should be addressed by the systems integration program. This document reports on that scoping analysis.
Date: November 1, 1980
Creator: Mendel, J. E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Hanford radiochemical site decommissioning demonstration program

Description: A program is proposed for the innovation, development, and demonstration of technologies necessary to decommission the Hanford radiochemical plant area to the extent that the sites can have unrestricted public access. The five tasks selected for development and demonstration of restoration techniques were restoration of a burial ground, decommissioning of a separations plant, restoration of a separations plant waste interim storage tank farm, restoration of a liquid disposal area, and disposal of large contaminated equipment. Process development requirements are tabulated and discussed. A proposed schedule and estimated costs are given. (JSR)
Date: August 1, 1971
Creator: Nelson, D.C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Legacy material work-off project

Description: Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and its subcontractors recently completed a nine-month legacy material clean-up effort. Legacy materials were defined as chemicals, hazardous, non-hazardous, and both hazardous and radioactive (mixed), that no longer served a programmatic use and had no identified individual owner within the Laboratory. Once personnel identified the legacy materials, the items were transferred to Solid Waste Operation`s (EM-SWO) control. Upon completing this process, the responsible division-level manager was required to certify that all non-radioactive hazardous and non-hazardous materials and acceptable mixed legacy materials had been identified and transferred to EM-SWO for proper handling or disposal. The major expense in this project was the cost of actual chemical and radiological analysis. This expense was the result of items not having an identified individual owner. The major benefit of this project is that LANL is now in an excellent position to implement its Integrated Safety Management (ISM) Plan, which requires the implementation of safe work practices, including requirements for removing unused items when vacating workspaces. Effective implementation of ISM will go a long way toward ensuring that legacy materials are no longer an issue at the Laboratory.
Date: January 25, 1999
Creator: Sloan, T.J. & Baker, D.H. IV
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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