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The Viscosity of Solids

Description: Preface: This bulletin is a second contribution to the general investigation of the physical contents of rocks, the experiments concerning which follow a general plan devised by Mr. Clarence King.
Date: 1891
Creator: Barus, Carl
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

NBS Viscometer Calibrating Liquids and Capillary Tube Viscometers

Description: Report discussing measurements of viscosity made with relative viscometers. These instruments must be calibrated with liquids whose viscosities are known. NBS provides a series of 10 oils for this purpose. Their viscosities range from 0.02 to 450 poises and their temperature coefficients of viscosity range from 2.1 to 9.4 percent per degree C. The less viscous oils are more stable. Correction formulas for errors or conditions are presented.
Date: December 26, 1962
Creator: Hardy, R. C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Seismic Determination of Reservoir Heterogeneity: Application to the Characterization of Heavy Oil Reservoirs

Description: The objective of the project was to examine how seismic and geologic data could be used to improve characterization of small-scale heterogeneity and their parameterization in reservoir models. The study was performed at West Coalinga Field in California.
Date: March 12, 2003
Creator: Imhof, Matthias G. & Castle, James W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Quantitative Methods for Reservoir Characterization and Improved Recovery: Application to Heavy Oil Sands

Description: The first twelve months of the project focused on collecting data for characterization and modeling. In addition, data from Coalinga Field was analyzed to define the fractal structure present in the data set. The following sections of the report parallel the first four subtasks of the investigation were: (1) Collect and Load Property Data from Temblor Outcrops in California, (2) Collect and Load Property Data from Temblor Reservoir Sands, West Coalinga Field, California, (3) Collect and Load Property Data from Continuous Upper Cretaceous Outcrops in Utah, and (4) Define Fractal Structure in the Data Sets and Apply to Generating Property Representations.
Date: November 29, 2001
Creator: Castle, James W. & Molz, Fred J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Quantitative Methods for Reservoir Characterization and Improved Recovery: Application to Heavy Oil Sands

Description: Improved prediction of interwell reservoir heterogeneity was needed to increase productivity and to reduce recovery cost for California's heavy oil sands, which contain approximately 2.3 billion barrels of remaining reserves in the Temblor Formation and in other formations of the San Joaquin Valley. This investigation involved application of advanced analytical property-distribution methods conditioned to continuous outcrop control for improved reservoir characterization and simulation.
Date: February 7, 2003
Creator: Castle, J.W.; Molz, F.J.; Brame, S.E. & Falta, R.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Quantitative Methods for Reservoir Characterization and Improved Recovery: Application to Heavy Oil Sands

Description: Improved prediction of interwell reservoir heterogeneity is needed to increase productivity and to reduce recovery cost for California's heavy oil sands, which contain approximately 2.3 billion barrels of remaining reserves in the Temblor Formation and in other formations of the San Joaquin Valley. This investigation involved application of advanced analytical property-distribution methods conditioned to continuous outcrop control for improved reservoir characterization and simulation.
Date: February 7, 2003
Creator: Castle, James W. & Molz, Fred J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Quantitative Methods for Reservoir Characterization and Improved Recovery: Application to Heavy Oil Sands

Description: Improved prediction of interwell reservoir heterogeneity was needed to increase productivity and to reduce recovery cost for California's heavy oil sands, which contain approximately 2.3 billion barrels of remaining reserves in the Temblor Formation and in other formations of the San Joaquin Valley. This investigation involved application of advanced analytical property-distribution methods conditioned to continuous outcrop control for improved reservoir characterization and simulation.
Date: February 7, 2003
Creator: Castle, J.W.; Bridges, R.A.; Lorinovich, C.J.; Molz, Fred J.; Dinwiddie, C.L. & Lu, S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Quantitative Methods for Reservoir Characterization and Improved Recovery: Application to Heavy Oil Sands

Description: Improved prediction of interwell reservoir heterogeneity was needed to increase productivity and to reduce recovery cost for California's heavy oil sands, which contain approximately 2.3 billion barrels of remaining reserves in the Temblor Formation and in other formations of the San Joaquin Valley. This investigation involved application of advanced analytical property-distribution methods conditioned to continuous outcrop control for improved reservoir characterization and simulation.
Date: February 7, 2003
Creator: Castle, James W.; Molz, Fred J.; Brame, Scott & Current, Caitlin J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

THE MOLECULAR AND VISCOUS EFFUSION OF SATURATED VAPORS (thesis)

Description: An investigation of the effusive behavior of saturated vapors over a range of source pressures from 10/sup -6/ atm in the molecular flow region to 1 atm is reported. The purposes of the investigation were to clarify the situation regarding the upper pressure limit to effusive flow, to examine the transition of effusive flow from molecular to viscous behavior, and to clarify some limited aspects concerning the question of vapor saturation within an effusion cell. Mass flow rates of mercury vapor effusing through a thin-edged orifice or long channels into a vacuum from a region of nearly saturated vapor were obtained. (W.D.M.)
Date: April 1, 1960
Creator: Carlson, K.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Seismic Determination of Reservoir Heterogeneity: Application to the Characterization of Heavy Oil Reservoirs

Description: The objective of the project was to examine how seismic and geologic data could be used to improve characterization of small-scale heterogeneity and their parameterization in reservoir models. Performed a theoretical and numerical study to examine which subsurface features the surface seismic method actually resolves.
Date: March 12, 2003
Creator: Imhof, Matthias G. & Castle, James W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Modeling the Responses of TSM Resonators under Various Loading Conditions

Description: We develop a general model that describes the electrical responses of thickness shear mode resonators subject to a variety of surface loadkgs. The model incorporates a physically diverse set of single component loadings, including rigid solids, viscoelastic media and fluids (Newtonian or Maxwellian). The model allows any number of these components to be combined in any configuration. Such multiple loadings are representative of a variety of physical situations encountered in electrochemical and other liquid phase applications, as well as gas phase applications. In the general case, the response of the composite is not a linear combination of the individual component responses. We discuss application of the model in a qualitative diagnostic fashion, to gain insight into the nature of the interracial structure, and in a quantitative fashion, to extract appropriate physical parameters, such as liquid viscosity and density and polymer shear moduli.
Date: December 4, 1998
Creator: Bandey, H.L.; Cernosek, R.W.; Hillman, A.R. & Martin, S.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Temperature-Viscosity Relations in the Ternary System CaO-Al₂O₃-SiO₂

Description: Technical paper issued by the Bureau of Mines over studies on the relations of temperature-viscosity. The "observations on the temperature-viscosity relations of silicates" (p. 5) are presented and discussed. This report includes tables, and illustrations.
Date: April 1918
Creator: Feild, Alexander L. & Royster, P. H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Exposing the non-collectivity in elliptic flow

Description: We show that backward-forward elliptic asymmetry correlations provide an experimentally accessible observable which distinguishes between collective and non-collective contributions to the observed elliptic asymmetry v2 in relativistic heavy ion collisions. The measurement of this observable will reveal the momentum scale at which collective expansion seizes and where the elliptic asymmetry is dominated by (semi)-hard processes. In addition, the knowledge of the actual magnitude of the collective component of the elliptic asymmetry will be essential for the extraction of the viscosity of the matter created in these collisions.
Date: February 13, 2009
Creator: Liao, Jinfeng & Koch, Volker
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

SEISMIC DETERMINATION OF RESERVOIR HETEROGENEITY: APPLICATION TO THE CHARACTERIZATION OF HEAVY OIL RESERVOIRS

Description: The objective of the project was to examine how seismic and geologic data can be used to improve characterization of small-scale heterogeneity and their parameterization in reservoir models. The study focused on West Coalinga Field in California. The project initially attempted to build reservoir models based on different geologic and geophysical data independently using different tools, then to compare the results, and ultimately to integrate them all. We learned, however, that this strategy was impractical. The different data and tools need to be integrated from the beginning because they are all interrelated. This report describes a new approach to geostatistical modeling and presents an integration of geology and geophysics to explain the formation of the complex Coalinga reservoir.
Date: February 1, 2005
Creator: Imhof, Matthias G. & Castle, James W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

SEISMIC DETERMINATION OF RESERVOIR HETEROGENEITY; APPLICATION TO THE CHARACTERIZATION OF HEAVY OIL RESERVOIRS

Description: The objective of the project is to examine how seismic and geologic data can be used to improve characterization of small-scale heterogeneity and their parameterization in reservoir models. The study is performed at West Coalinga Field in California. We continued our investigation on the nature of seismic reactions from heterogeneous reservoirs. We began testing our algorithm to infer parameters of object-based reservoir models from seismic data. We began integration of seismic and geologic data to determine the deterministic limits of conventional seismic data interpretation. Lastly, we began integration of seismic and geologic heterogeneity using stochastic models conditioned both on wireline and seismic data.
Date: November 1, 2003
Creator: Imhof, Matthias G. & Castle, James W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Relative Permeabilities: a pore-level model study of the capillary number dependence

Description: Relative permeabilities are widely used by the petroleum industry in reservoir simulations of recovery strategies. In recent years, pore level modeling has been used to determine relative permeabilities at zero capillary number for a variety of more and more realistic model porous media. Unfortunately, these studies cannot address the issue of the observed capillary number dependence of the relative permeabilities. Several years ago, we presented a method for determining the relative permeabilities from pore-level modeling at general capillary number. We have used this method to determine the relative permeabilities at several capillary numbers and stable viscosity ratios. In addition, we have determined these relative permeabilities using one of the standard dynamic methods for determining relative permeabilities from core flood experiments. Our results from the two methods are compared with each other and with experimental results.
Date: March 1, 2008
Creator: Ferer, M.V.; Mason, G.; Bromhal, G.S. & Smith, D.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Impact of Waste Loading on Viscosity in the Frit 418-SB3 System

Description: In this report, data are provided to gain insight into the potential impact of a lower viscosity glass on melter stability (i.e., pressure spikes, cold cap behavior) and/or pour stream stability. High temperature viscosity data are generated for the Frit 418-SB3 system as a function of waste loading (from 30 to 45 percent) and compared to similar data from other systems that have been (or are currently being) processed through the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) melter. The data are presented in various formats to potentially align the viscosity data with physical observations at various points in the melter system or critical DWPF processing unit operations. The expectations is that the data will be provided adequate insight into the vitrification parameters which might evolve into working solutions as DWPF strives to maximize waste throughput. This report attempts to provide insight into a physical interpretation of the data from a DWPF perspective. The theories present ed are certainly not an all inclusive list and the order in which they are present does imply a ranking, probability, or likelihood that the proposed theory is even plausible. The intent of this discussion is to provide a forum in which the viscosity data can be discussed in relation to possible mechanisms which could potentially lead to a workable solution as discussed in relation to possible solution as higher overall attainment is striven for during processing of the current or future sludge batches.
Date: August 1, 2004
Creator: PEELER, DAVID
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Effect of high-viscosity interphases on drainage between hydrophilic surfaces.

Description: Drainage of water from the region between an advancing probe tip and a flat sample is reconsidered under the assumption that the tip and sample surfaces are both coated by a thin water 'interphase' (of width {approx}a few nm) whose viscosity is much higher than the bulk liquid's. A formula derived by solving the Navier-Stokes equations allows one to extract an interphase viscosity of {approx}59 KPa-sec (or {approx}6.6x10{sup 7} times the viscosity of bulk water at 25C) from Interfacial Force Microscope measurements with both tip and sample functionalized hydrophilic by OH-terminated tri(ethylene glycol) undecylthiol, self-assembled monolayers.
Date: October 1, 2004
Creator: Feibelman, Peter Julian
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Strictly hyperbolic models of co-current three-phase flow withgravity

Description: We study the character of the equations in the traditional formulation of one-dimensional immiscible three-phase flow with gravity, in the limit of negligible capillarity. We restrict our analysis to co-current flow required for a displacement process; in cases of mixed co-current and counter-current flow, capillarity effects cannot be dropped from the formulation. The model makes use of the classical multiphase extension of Darcy's equation. It is well known that, if relative permeabilities are taken as fixed functions of saturations, the model yields regions in the saturation space where the system of equations is locally elliptic. We regard elliptic behavior as a nonphysical artifact of an incomplete formulation, and derive conditions on the relative permeabilities that ensure strict hyperbolicity of the governing equations. The key point is to acknowledge that a Darcy-type formulation is insufficient to capture all the physics of three-phase flow and that, consequently, the relative permeabilities are functionals that depend on the fluid viscosity ratio and the gravity number. The derived conditions are consistent with the type of displacements that take place in porous media. By means of an illustrative example, we show how elliptic behavior can be removed, even when using simplistic relative permeability models.
Date: November 18, 2002
Creator: Juanes, Ruben & Patzek, Tadeusz W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Task 3.0 - Advanced Power Systems Subtask 3.18 - Ash Behavior in Power Systems

Description: Ash behavior in power systems can have a significant impact on the design and performance of advanced power systems. The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) has focused significant effort on ash behavior in conventional power systems that can be applied to advanced power systems. This initiative focuses on filling gaps in the understanding of fundamental mechanisms of ash behavior that has relevance to commercial application and marketable products. This program develops methods and means to better understand and mitigate adverse coal ash behavior in power systems and can act to relieve the U.S. reliance on diminishing recoverable oil resources, especially those resources that are not domestically available and are fairly uncertain.
Date: July 1, 1997
Creator: Zygarlicke, Christopher J. & McCollor, Donald P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Quantitative Methods for Reservoir Characterization and Improved Recovery: Application to Heavy Oil Sands

Description: This project involved application of advanced analytical property-distribution methods conditioned to continuous outcrop control for improved reservoir characterization and simulation. The investigation was performed in collaboration with Chevron Production Company U.S.A. as an industrial partner, and incorporates data from the Temblor Formation in Chevron's West Coalinga Field, California. Improved prediction of interwell reservoir heterogeneity was needed to increase productivity and to reduce recovery cost for California's heavy oil sands, which contained approximately 2.3 billion barrels of remaining reserves in the Temblor Formation and in other formations of the San Joaquin Valley.
Date: February 7, 2003
Creator: Castle, James W.; Molz, Fred W.; Bridges, Robert A.; Dinwiddie, Cynthia L.; Lorinovich, Caitlin J. & Lu, Silong
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Effects of Color Concentrate in Polyolefins.

Description: Throughout history consumer products were generally manufactured from wood and metal. They either had to hold their natural color or become subject to painting. When plastics entered the industry, it was recognized for its ease of shaping, re-usability, physical properties and its low cost. One of plastics' greatest benefits is its ability to hold a given color from within allowing it to avoid use of paint. This paper will give a brief overview on the effects of pigments when incorporated in a polyolefin. It will provide a classification of the main types of pigments and how each effect the properties of the product through: crystallization, weatherability, opacity, coloristic values and of course viscosity.
Access: This item is restricted to UNT Community Members. Login required if off-campus.
Date: December 2001
Creator: Flora, Paul
Partner: UNT Libraries