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Dogmatism, Anxiety, and Attitudes Toward the Vietnam War

Description: The purpose of this study was to determine if there is a relationship between dogmatism, anxiety, and attitudes toward the Vietnam War, and, in the process of doing so, to test Rokeach's hypothesis of independence of belief structure and content in the contextual atmosphere of recent attitudes toward the Vietnam War. The Vietnam War Scale, Form E of the Dogmatism Scale, and a five-situation version of the S-R Inventory of Anxiousness were administered to 104 male students who were enrolled in introductory psychology classes at North Texas State University. It was hypothesized I. That there would be a significant positive relationship between dogmatism (as measured by the Dogmatism Scale) and anxiety (as measured by a five-situation version of the S-R Inventory of Anxiousness). II. That there would be a significant positive relationship between closed-mindedness (as measured by the Dogmatism Scale) and attitudes toward the Vietnam War (as measured by the Vietnam War Scale). III. That the Hawks would show a significantly higher level of dogmatism than the Doves. IV. That the Hawks would show a significantly higher level of anxiety than the Doves. Hypotheses one, two, and three were supported. Hypothesis number four was in the predicted direction, but was not statistically significant. The conclusion of the study was that a relationship exists between dogmatism, anxiety, and attitudes toward the Vietnam War. It was also concluded that Rokeach's hypothesis of independence of belief structure and content does not apply to the contextual atmosphere of recent attitudes toward the Vietnam War.
Date: December 1971
Creator: Puddy, Phillip Aldon
Partner: UNT Libraries

Three Days and Two Nights

Description: This novel of the Vietnam War examines the effects of prolonged stress on individuals and groups. The narrative, which is told from the points of view of four widely different characters, follows an infantry company through three days and two nights of combat on a small island off the coast of the northern I Corps military region. The story's principal themes are the loss of communication that contributes to and is caused by the background of chaos that arises from combat; the effect of brutal warfare on the individual spirit; and the way groups reorganize themselves to cope with the confusion of the battlefield. The thesis includes an explication of the novel, explaining some of the technical details of its production.
Date: August 1978
Creator: Lewis, Jay B.
Partner: UNT Libraries

United States Psychological Operations in Support of Counterinsurgency: Vietnam, 1960 to 1965.

Description: This thesis describes the development of psychological operations capabilities, introduction of forces, and the employment in Vietnam during the period 1960-1965. The complex interplay of these activities is addressed, as well as the development of PSYOP doctrine and training in the period prior to the introduction of ground combat forces in 1965. The American PSYOP advisory effort supported the South Vietnamese at all levels, providing access to training, material support, and critical advice. In these areas the American effort was largely successful. Yet, instability in the wake of President Ngo Dinh Diem's overthrow created an impediment to the ability of psychological operations to change behaviors and positively affect the outcome.
Date: May 2010
Creator: Roberts, Mervyn Edwin, III
Partner: UNT Libraries

Rattler One-Seven: A Vietnam Helicopter Pilot's War Story

Description: Rattler One-Seven puts you in the helicopter seat, to see the war in Vietnam through the eyes of an inexperienced pilot as he transforms himself into a seasoned combat veteran. When Chuck Gross left for Vietnam in 1970, he was a nineteen-year-old Army helicopter pilot fresh out of flight school. He spent his entire Vietnam tour with the 71st Assault Helicopter Company flying UH-1 Huey helicopters. Soon after the war he wrote down his adventures, while his memory was still fresh with the events. Rattler One-Seven (his call sign) is written as Gross experienced it, using these notes along with letters written home to accurately preserve the mindset he had while in Vietnam. During his tour Gross flew Special Operations for the MACV-SOG, inserting secret teams into Laos. He notes that Americans were left behind alive in Laos, when official policy at home stated that U.S. forces were never there. He also participated in Lam Son 719, a misbegotten attempt by the ARVN to assault and cut the Ho Chi Minh Trail with U.S. Army helicopter support. It was the largest airmobile campaign of the war and marked the first time that the helicopter was used in mid-intensity combat, with disastrous results. Pilots in their early twenties, with young gunners and a Huey full of ARVN soldiers, took on experienced North Vietnamese antiaircraft artillery gunners, with no meaningful intelligence briefings or a rational plan on how to cut the Trail. More than one hundred helicopters were lost and more than six hundred aircraft sustained combat damage. Gross himself was shot down and left in the field during one assault. Rattler One-Seven will appeal to those interested in the Vietnam War and to all armed forces, especially aviators, who have served for their country.
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Date: August 15, 2004
Creator: Gross, Chuck
Partner: UNT Press

Vietnam Veterans Memorial State Park

Description: Portion of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial State Park in New Mexico, including the walkway and entrance, with a winding wall and totem plaques.
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Date: 1968
Creator: Luna, Ted & Westphall, Victor
Location Info:
Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design

Mercenaries in service to America: the "More Flags" foreign policy of the United States

Description: This study presents the available history of the "More Flags" program during the years of the Johnson Presidency, with an emphasis on the documentation of the program's use as a disguise for america's obtaining military forces from the Republic of Korea, the Philippines and Thailand. The non-mercenary groups from Australia and New Zealand are likewise examined.
Date: August 1992
Creator: Blackburn, Robert M. (Robert Michael)
Partner: UNT Libraries

Donut Dolly: an American Red Cross Girl's War in Vietnam

Description: Donut Dolly puts you in the Vietnam War face down in the dirt under a sniper attack, inside a helicopter being struck by lightning, at dinner next to a commanding general, and slogging through the mud along a line of foxholes. You see the war through the eyes of one of the first women officially allowed in the combat zone. When Joann Puffer Kotcher left for Vietnam in 1966, she was fresh out of the University of Michigan with a year of teaching, and a year as an American Red Cross Donut Dolly in Korea. All she wanted was to go someplace exciting. In Vietnam, she visited troops from the Central Highlands to the Mekong Delta, from the South China Sea to the Cambodian border. At four duty stations, she set up recreation centers and made mobile visits wherever commanders requested. That included Special Forces Teams in remote combat zone jungles. She brought reminders of home, thoughts of a sister or the girl next door. Officers asked her to take risks because they believed her visits to the front lines were important to the men. Every Vietnam veteran who meets her thinks of her as a brother-at-arms. Donut Dolly is Kotcher’s personal view of the war, recorded in a journal kept during her tour, day by day as she experienced it. It is a faithful representation of the twists and turns of the turbulent, controversial time. While in Vietnam, Kotcher was once abducted; dodged an ambush in the Delta; talked with a true war hero in a hospital who had charged a machine gun; and had a conversation with a prostitute. A rare account of an American Red Cross volunteer in Vietnam, Donut Dolly will appeal to those interested in the Vietnam War, to those who have interest in the ...
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Date: November 15, 2011
Creator: Kotcher, Joann Puffer
Partner: UNT Press

The Phantom Vietnam War: An F-4 Pilot’s Combat over Laos

Description: David R. “Buff” Honodel was a cocky young man with an inflated self-image when he arrived in 1969 at his base in Udorn, Thailand. His war was not in Vietnam; it was a secret one in the skies of a neighboring country almost unknown in America, attacking the Ho Chi Minh Trail that fed soldiers and supplies from North Vietnam into the South. Stateside he learned the art of flying the F-4, but in combat, the bomb-loaded fighter handled differently, targets shot back, and people suffered. Inert training ordnance was replaced by lethal weapons. In the air, a routine day mission turned into an unexpected duel with a deadly adversary. Complacency during a long night mission escorting a gunship almost led to death. A best friend died just before New Year’s. A RF-4 crashed into the base late in Buff’s tour of duty. The reader will experience Buff’s war from the cockpit of a supersonic F-4D Phantom II, doing 5-G pullouts after dropping six 500-pound bombs on trucks hidden beneath triple jungle canopy. These were well defended by a skillful, elusive, determined enemy firing back with 37mm anti-aircraft fire and tracers in the sky. The man who left the States was a naïve, self-centered young pilot. The man who came back 137 missions later was much different.
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Date: September 2018
Creator: Honodel, David R.
Partner: UNT Press

Beyond the Quagmire: New Interpretations of the Vietnam War

Description: In Beyond the Quagmire, thirteen scholars from across disciplines provide a series of provocative, important, and timely essays on the politics, combatants, and memory of the Vietnam War. The essays pose new questions, offer new answers, and establish important lines of debate regarding social, political, military, and memory studies. Part 1 contains four chapters by scholars who explore the politics of war in the Vietnam era. In Part 2, five contributors offer chapters on Vietnam combatants with analyses of race, gender, environment, and Chinese intervention. Part 3 provides four innovative and timely essays on Vietnam in history and memory.
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Date: March 2019
Creator: Jensen, Geoffrey W. & Stith, Matthew M.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Phantom in the Sky: A Marine’s Back Seat View of the Vietnam War

Description: Phantom in the Sky is the story of a Radar Intercept Officer (RIO) in the back seat of the supersonic Phantom jet during the Vietnam War—a unique, tactical perspective of the “guy in back,” or GIB, absent from other published aviation accounts. During the time of Terry L. Thorsen’s service from 1966 to 1970, the RIO played an integral part in enemy aircraft interception and ordnance delivery. In Navy and Marine F-4 Phantom jets, the RIO was a second pair of eyes for the pilot, in charge of communications and navigation, and great to have during emergencies. Thorsen endured the tough Platoon Leaders Course at Quantico and barely earned a commission. He underwent aviation and intercept training while suffering airsickness issues—and still earned his wings. Thorsen joined the oldest and most decorated squadron in the Marine Corps, the VMFA-232 Red Devils in southern California, as it prepared for deployment to Vietnam. In combat, Thorsen felt angst when he saw the sky darken around him from anti-aircraft artillery explosions high above the Ho Chi Minh Trail. On his first close air support mission in support of ground troops (the majority of his Marine aviation missions), he witnessed tracers whiz by his canopy. On one harrowing sortie, he and his pilot purposely became the target to save an Army unit battling an enemy just a hundred feet away. On secret missions with secret weapons, they dove at anti-aircraft artillery muzzle flashes and flew as a low as fifty feet off the deck during close air support sorties, "scraping" the napalm off their plane. For one mission a friend survived a crash landing, but a training instructor vanished without a trace.
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Date: March 2019
Creator: Thorsen, Terry L.
Partner: UNT Libraries

[News Script: March]

Description: Script from the WBAP-TV/NBC station in Fort Worth, Texas, relating a news story.
Date: October 15, 1969, 10:00 p.m.
Creator: WBAP-TV (Television station : Fort Worth, Tex.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections