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A Two-Period Model of Emission Abatement and Allowance Banking Under Uncertainty

Description: This paper deals with the effects of uncertainty and risk aversion on market outcomes for SO{sub 2} emission allowance prices and on electric utility compliance choices. The 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) provide about twice as many SO{sub 2} allowances to be issued per year in Phase I (1995--1999) than in Phase II. Also, considering the scrubber incentives in Phase I, there is likely to be substantial emission banking for use in Phase II. Allowance prices may increase over time at a rate less than the return on alternative investments with allowances being banked only by risk averse electric utilities. Speculators are likely to be willing to set allowances in forward markets, which will lower current market prices of allowances relative to a situation with only risk averse utilities in the market. The Argonne Utility Simulation Model (ARGUS2) is being revised to incorporate the provisions of the CAAA acid rain title and to simulate SO{sub 2} allowance prices, compliance choices, capacity expansion, system dispatch, fuel use, and emissions using a unit level data base and alternative scenario assumptions.
Date: December 31, 1991
Creator: Hanson, Donald A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Fuel quality issues in the oil heat industry

Description: The quality of fuel oil plays an essential role in combustion performance and efficient operation of residential heating equipment. With the present concerns by the oil-heat industry of declining fuel-oil quality, a study was initiated to identify the factors that have brought about changes in the quality of distillate fuel. A background of information will be provided to the industry, which is necessary to deal with the problems relating to the fuel. The high needs for servicing heating equipment are usually the result of the poor handling characteristics of the fuel during cold weather, the buildup of dirt and water in storage tanks, and microbial growth. A discussion of how to deal with these problems is presented in this paper. The effectiveness of fuel additives to control these problems of quality is also covered to help users better understand the functions and limitations of chemical treatment. Test data have been collected which measure and compare changes in the properties of fuel using selected additives.
Date: December 1, 1992
Creator: Litzke, Wai-Lin
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Pilot plant test results and demonstration of the Ahlstrom Pyroflow pressurized CFB technology

Description: Ahlstrom Pyropower initiated development of PCFB technology in 1086 after a detailed analysis of competing advanced coal utilization technologies. A 10 MWth pilot plant was started up in 1989 and has produced very promising test results which are highly competitive with coal gasification. This led to a successful application for demonstration of the technology under round III of the DOE Clean Coal Technology Program. The resulting project is Iowa Power`s DMEC-1 PCFB Repowering Project. The project is currently in the preliminary engineering phase with supporting pilot plant testing being performed in parallel. Successful demonstration of PCFB technology will provide utilities with a cost effective option for repowering older power stations to comply with the requirements of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendment in the near term and a clean and high efficiency new plant option in the longer term. This paper will present recent pilot plant test results and review the major technical features of the DMEC-1 project.
Date: November 1, 1992
Creator: Provol, S. J. & Dryden, R. J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Constitutional and legal implications of arms control verification technologies

Description: United States law can both help and hinder the use of instrumentation as a component of arms control verification in this country. It can foster the general use of sophisticated verification technologies, where such devices are consistent with the value attached to privacy by the Fourth Amendment to the United States Constitution. On the other hand, law can hinder reliance on devices that cross this constitutional line, or where such technology itself threatens health, safety, or environment as such threats are defined in federal statutes. The purpose of this conference paper is to explain some of the lessons that have been learned about the relationship between law and verification technologies in the hope that law can help more than hinder. This paper has three parts. In order to start with a common understanding, part I will briefly describe the hierarchy of treaties, the Constitution, federal statutes, and state and local laws. Part 2 will discuss how the specific constitutional requirement that the government respect the right of privacy in all of its endeavors may affect the use of verification technologies. Part 3 will explain the environmental law constraints on verification technology as exemplified by the system of on-site sampling embodied in the current Rolling Text of the Draft Chemical Weapons Convention.
Date: September 1, 1992
Creator: Tanzman, E. A. & Haffenden, R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Clean coal technology and emissions trading: Is there a future for high-sulfur coal under the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990?

Description: The near-term and long-term fate of high-sulfur coal is linked to utility compliance plans, the evolution of emission allowance trading, state and federal regulation, and technological innovation. All of these factors will play an implicit role in the demand for high-sulfur coal. This paper will explore the potential impact that emissions trading will have on high-sulfur coal utilization by electric utilities. 28 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.
Date: December 31, 1991
Creator: Bailey, K. A.; South, D. W. & McDermott, K. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Clean coal technology and acid rain compliance: An examination of alternative incentive proposals

Description: The Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990 rely primarily on the use of market incentives to stimulate least-cost compliance choices by electric utilities. Because of the potential risks associated with selecting Clean Coal Technologies (CCTs) and the public-good nature of technology commercialization, electric utilities may be reluctant to adopt CCTs as part of their compliance strategies. This paper examines the nature of the risks and perceived impediments to adopting CCTs as a compliance option. It also discusses the incentives that regulatory policy makers could adopt to mitigate these barriers to CCT adoption. (VC)
Date: 1991
Creator: McDermott, K. A. & South, D. W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Federal Environmental Permitting Handbook. Environmental Guidance

Description: The handbook consists of eight chapters addressing permitting and licensing requirements under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980, as amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (CERCLA/SARA), the Atomic Energy Act (AEA), the Clean Air Act (CAA), the Clean Water Act (CWA), the Federal Insectide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA), the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA), and the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA). Each chapter consists of: (1) an introduction to the statute and permitting requirements; (2) a diagram illustrating the relationship between permitting requirements under the statute being discussed and permitting requirements from other environmental statutes which may have to be addressed when applying for a particular permit (e.g., when applying for a RCRA permit, permits and permit applications under the CWA, CAA, SDWA, etc. would have to be listed in the RCRA permit application); and, (3) a compilation of the permitting requirements for the regulatory program resulting from the statute. In addition, the Handbook contains a permitting keyword index and a listing of hotline telephone numbers for each of the statutes.
Date: May 1, 1991
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990: Hazardous Air Pollutant Requirements and the DOE Clean Coal Technology Program

Description: The purpose of the US Department of Energy -- Office of Fossil Energy (DOE FE) Clean Coal Technology Program (CCTP) is to provide the US energy marketplace with advanced, efficient, and environmentally sound coal-based technologies. The design, construction, and operation of Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Projects (CCTDP) will generate data needed to make informed, confident decisions on the commercial readiness of these technologies. These data also will provide information needed to ensure a proactive response by DOE and its industrial partners to the establishment of new regulations or a reactive response to existing regulations promulgated by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The objectives of this paper are to: (1) Present a preliminary examination of the potential implications of the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) -- Title 3 Hazardous Air Pollutant requirements to the commercialization of CCTDP; and (2) help define options available to DOE and its industrial partners to respond to this newly enacted Legislation.
Date: December 31, 1991
Creator: Moskowitz, P. D.; DePhillips, M.; Fthenakis, V. M. & Hemenway, A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Minorities and air quality non-attainment areas: A preliminary geo-demographic analysis

Description: A major section of the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) focuses on reducing air pollution through extending and modifying the provisions for states and localities with US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-designated non-attainment areas. Specifically, Title 1 of the CAAA is concerned with non-attainment areas, as defined relative to the National Ambient Air Quality Standards for atmospheric ozone, carbon monoxide, and particulate matter; Title 2 is concerned with mobile sources or air pollution, which produce carbon monoxide, contribute to ozone concentrations, and in the past have been a major source of airborne lead; and Title 4 is concerned with acid deposition, mainly due to sulfur dioxide emissions. This paper has its origin in the question of the potential benefits for minorities--relative to the majority non-Black, non-Hispanic population--of reductions in air pollution that may result from these amendments. It is part of a larger effort to identify and assess the costs and benefits of the CAAA for minorities, relative to the majority population. The focus of this paper centers on comparing Black and Hispanic populations to White, non-Hispanic populations living in EPA-designated non-attainment area counties in the contiguous United States, which excludes Alaska and Hawaii. Subsequent comparisons of majority populations with Native Americans and Asian-Americans will include these two states.
Date: June 1, 1991
Creator: Wernette, D. & Nieves, L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

To mitigate or not to mitigate: Regulatory treatment of emissions trading and its effect on marketplace incentives

Description: The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (hereafter CAAA) have created a market-based mechanism that is designed to employ a profit-oriented incentive to enable electric utilities to reduce SO{sub 2} emissions at the least cost. One of the most important challenges facing state regulatory utility commissions in the next decade is the integration of this marker-based profit-incentive process into the traditional rate-base, rate-of-return, profit-control approach to regulation. How the struggle to meld two potentially contradictory control and incentive programs will be resolved remains to be seen. As of now, it is an open question. The purpose of this paper is to help clarify some of the issues that need to be addressed and to offer some policy recommendations that will allow regulators to employ the effectiveness of market forces while they still retain overall control of the evolution of the regulated electric supply market.
Date: December 31, 1991
Creator: McDermott, K. A. & South, D. W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Allowance trading: Market operations and regulatory response

Description: The use of the SO{sub 2} allowance system as defined by Title IV of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments offers utilities greater compliance flexibility than EPA technology standards, State Implementation Plan (SEP) performance standards, or EPA bubble/offset strategies. Traditional methods at best offered the utility the ability to trade emissions between different units at a particular plant. The SO{sub 2} emissions trading system advocated under Title IV will allow a utility to trade emissions across its utility system, and/or trade emissions between utilities to take advantage of interfirm control cost differences. The use of transferable emission allowances offers utilities greater flexibility in the choice of how to control emissions: the choices include fuel switching, flue gas scrubbing, environmental dispatch, repowering, and even the choice not to control emissions [as long as the New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) and Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements are met]. The added flexibility allows utilities to choose the least cost manner of compliance with Title IV requirements. It is hoped (intended) that pollution control cost-minimization by individual utilities will in turn reduce the cost of controlling SO{sub 2} for the electric utility industry in aggregate. In addition, through the use of NO{sub x} emission averaging, the utility would average NO{sub x} emissions from different point sources in order to comply with the prescribed emission standard.
Date: December 31, 1992
Creator: Bailey, K. A.; South, D. W. & McDermott, K. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Environmental regulations handbook for enhanced oil recovery

Description: This handbook is intended to assist owners and operators of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) operations in acquiring some introductory knowledge of the various state agencies, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the many environmental laws, rules and regulations which can have jurisdiction over their permitting and compliance activities. It is a compendium of summarizations of environmental rules. It is not intended to give readers specific working details of what is required from them, nor can it be used in that manner. Readers of this handbook are encouraged to contact environmental control offices nearest to locations of interest for current regulations affecting them.
Date: December 1, 1991
Creator: Madden, M. P.; Blatchford, R. P. & Spears, R. B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The acid precipitation provisions of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments and minorities` energy consumption

Description: In November 1990 Congress passed a comprehensive set of amendments to the Clean Air Act of 1977 with potentially very high compliance costs. The provisions pertaining to control of acid precipitation have been specified with sufficient detail to examine their cost impacts. These provisions will require investment in emissions control technology, mainly by electric utilities. Production costs will increase due to the required investment, resulting in higher electricity prices. This paper examines the possible magnitude of these effects and whether there might be differential impacts on racial/ethnic minority groups. Differential impacts were considered a possibility because of the differences in the percentage of total income spent on energy by various population subgroups. In 1989, the Majority group (defined as non-Black, non-Hispanic) spent about three percent of household income on energy, while Blacks spent double that, six percent, and Hispanics spent about four percent. (The differences in income underlying these figures are greater, however, than the differences in energy expenditures). To address these issues, we compare projected electricity consumption and expenditures and total energy expenditures for Black, Hispanic, and Majority households. The distribution of benefits from reducing acid precipitation is not addressed since the possible effects on ambient air quality in specific geographical areas that are directly attributable to reducing utilities` sulfur dioxide emissions are highly uncertain.
Date: December 31, 1991
Creator: Nieves, L. A. & Wernette, D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Addendum to industrial market assessment of the products of mild gasification

Description: The objective of this report is to review and update the 1988 report by J. E. Sinor Consultants Inc., ``Industrial Market Assessment of the Products of Mild Gasification, and to more fully present market opportunities for two char-based products from the mild gasification process (MGP): Formcoke for the iron and steel industry, and activated carbon for wastewater cleanup and flue gas scrubbing. Please refer to the original report for additional details. In the past, coal conversion projects have and liquids produced, and the value of the residual char was limited to its fuel value. Some projects had limited success until gas and oil competition overwhelmed them. The strategy adopted for this assessment is to seek first a premium value for the char in a market that has advantages over gas and oil, and then to find the highest values possible for gases, liquids, and tars, either on-site or sold into existing markets. During the intervening years since the 1988 report, there have been many changes in the national economy, industrial production, international competition, and environmental regulations. The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA) will have a large impact on industry. There is considerable uncertainty about how the Act will be implemented, but it specifically addresses coke-oven batteries. This may encourage industry to consider formcoke produced via mild gasification as a low-pollution substitute for conventional coke. The chemistry and technology of coke making steel were reviewed in the 1988 market assessment and will not be repeated here. The CAAA require additional pollution control measures for most industrial facilities, but this creates new opportunities for the mild gasification process.
Date: May 1, 1992
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Environmental Regulatory Update Table, January/February 1992

Description: The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bi-monthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action. This table is for January/February 1992.
Date: March 1, 1992
Creator: Houlberg, L. M.; Hawkins, G. T. & Salk, M. S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Environmental Regulatory Update Table, March/April 1992

Description: The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bi-monthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.
Date: May 1, 1992
Creator: Houlberg, L. M.; Hawkins, G. T. & Salk, M. S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Agenda and briefing book: Clean Coal Technology Coordinating Committee, September 16, 1991, Louisville, Kentucky

Description: A considerable amount of time was spent discussing the Clean Air Act Amendments pending before Congress. Several members pointed out provisions of the legislation that would have serious impacts on the coal industry and the electric utility industry. The need for increased electricity in Florida raised the question about coal fired Power Plants. It is generally believed that most people in Florida do not know that over 55 percent of the electricity now comes from coal-fired generators. However, publicly, people will say they do not want coal-fired facilities built in Florida. People in Florida are concerned with the EMF Issue just as much as the source of power. It was stated that the coal industry has a very poor image and DOE should assume responsibility for improving the image of coal. it was agreed that it would take a considerable financial commitment to do this and that in addition to government the industry would have to be willing to contribute financially. The Partial results of a survey to utilities concerning the future use of clean coal technologies was reported. Utilities are not ignoring coal technologies but acknowledged that the amendments to the Clean Air Act would be the driving force in future decisions. It was learned through the survey that the DOE negotiation process in the Clean Coal Technology Program was in need of improvement. DOE had recently changed the procedure internally and it was anticipated that the procedure would be smoother in the future.
Date: September 16, 1991
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Economic Evaluation Guide for alternative transportation fuels

Description: The production of this Economic Evaluation Guide is one activity of AVFCAP. The guide is intended for use by project managers and fleet operators in the public sector. Public fleets have been identified as one of the most likely areas where ATFs will first gain widespread use, because of existing and impending state and federal legislative mandates, as well as for practical reasons such as centralized servicing and refueling. The purpose of this guide is to provide balanced decision-support information to project managers who are considering conducting, or currently managing, ATF demonstration programs. Information for this guide was gathered as part of a related AVFCAP activity, the development of an Information Resource Database. Economic issues related to the development and implementation of ATF programs at the local government level are extremely complex, and require an analysis of federal policies and national and international economics that is generally beyond the scope of local government project managers. The intent of this guide is to examine the information available on the economic evaluation of ATFs, and identify key elements that will help local governments realistically assess the potential costs and savings of an ATF program. The guide also discusses how these various economic factors are related, and how local government priorities affect how different factors are weighed.
Date: December 31, 1992
Creator: de Percin, D. & Werner, J. F. Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Carbonation as a binding mechanism for coal/calcium hydroxide pellets. Technical report, December 1, 1991--February 29, 1992

Description: In this project supported by the CRSC, the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) and the Engineering Research Laboratory (CERL), ISGS is investigating the pelletization of fine coal with calcium hydroxide, a sulfur capturing sorbent. The objective is to produce a readily-transportable fuel which will burn in compliance with the recently passed Clean Air Act Amendments. To improve the economics of pelletization, carbonation, or, the reaction of carbon dioxide with calcium hydroxide to produce a binding matrix of calcium carbonate, is being investigated as a method of hardening pelletized coal fines. Previous results indicate that carbonation significantly improves pellet quality including serving to weatherproof the pellets. During this quarter, work was conducted on several topics. Calcium oxide was investigated as a potentially lower cost binder than calcium hydroxide and was determined to be of comparable effectiveness on a molar basis indicating some potential for an overall cost savings. The effect of pellet size on pellet quality was also investigated. Results indicate that 1/4 and 1/2-inch diameter pellets have similar compressive strengths when compared on the basis of pounds per square inch crushing pressure. Also a low cost starch was tested as an alternative binder. Although cheaper per pound than a starch binder previously tested, it was not less expensive when evaluated on the basis of pellet quality attained.
Date: September 1, 1992
Creator: Rapp, D. M. Ehrlinger, H. P.; Hackley, K. C.; Lytle, J. M.; Moran, D. L.; Berger, R. L.; Schanche, G. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Practical aspects of steam injection processes: A handbook for independent operators

Description: More than 80% of the total steam injection process operating costs are for the production of steam and the operation of surface and subsurface equipment. The proper design and operation of the surface equipment is of critical importance to the success of any steam injection operation. However, the published monographs on thermal recovery have attached very little importance to this aspect of thermal oil recovery; hence, a definite need exists for a comprehensive manual that places emphasis on steam injection field practices and problems. This handbook is an attempt to fulfill this need. This handbook explores the concept behind steam injection processes and discusses the information required to evaluate, design, and implement these processes in the field. The emphasis is on operational aspects and those factors that affect the technology and economics of oil recovery by steam. The first four chapters describe the screening criteria, engineering, and economics of steam injection operation as well as discussion of the steam injection fundamentals. The next four chapters begin by considering the treatment of the water used to generate steam and discuss in considerable detail the design, operation and problems of steam generations, distribution and steam quality determination. The subsurface aspects of steamflood operations are addressed in chapters 9 through 12. These include thermal well completion and cementing practices, insulated tubulars, and lifting equipment. The next two chapters are devoted to subsurface operational problems encountered with the use of steam. Briefly described in chapters 15 and 16 are the steam injection process surface production facilities, problems and practices. Chapter 17 discusses the importance of monitoring in a steam injection project. The environmental laws and issues of importance to steam injection operation are outlined in chapter 18.
Date: October 1, 1992
Creator: Sarathi, P. S. & Olsen, D. K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

An update on environmental, health and safety issues of interest to the photovoltaic industry

Description: There is growing interest in the environmental, health, and safety issues related to new photovoltaic technologies as they approach commercialization. Such issues include potential toxicity of II--VI compounds; the impacts of new environmental regulations on module manufacturers; and, the need for recycling of spent modules and manufacturing wastes. This paper will review these topics. 20 refs.
Date: August 1, 1992
Creator: Moskowitz, P. D.; Viren, J. & Fthenakis, V. M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

An analysis of SO{sub 2} emission compliance under the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments

Description: The effectiveness of SO{sub 2} emission allowance trading under Title 4 of the 1990 Amendments to the Clean Air Act (CAA) is of great interest due to the innovative nature of this market incentive approach. However, it may be a mistake to frame the compliance problem for a utility as a decision to trade or not. Trading of allowances should be the consequence, not the decision. The two meaningful decision variables for a utility are the control approaches chosen for its units and the amount of allowances to hold in its portfolio of assets for the future. The number allowances to be bought or sold (i.e. traded) is determined by the emission reduction and banking decisions. Our preferred approach is to think of the problem in terms of ABC`s of the 1990 CAA Amendments: abatement strategy, banking, and cost competitiveness. The implications of the general principles presented in this paper on least cost emission reductions and emissions banking to hedge against risk are being simulated with version 2 of the ARGUS model representing the electric utility sector and regional coal supplies and transportation rates. A rational expectations forecast for allowances prices is being computed. The computed allowance price path has the property that demand for allowances by electric utilities for current use or for banking must equal the supply of allowances issued by the federal government or provided as forward market contracts in private market transactions involving non-utility speculators. From this rational expectations equilibrium forecast, uncertainties are being explored using sensitivity tests. Some of the key issues are the amount of scrubbing and when it is economical to install it, the amount of coal switching and how much low sulfur coal premiums will be bid up; and the amount of emission trading within utilities and among different utilities.
Date: July 1, 1992
Creator: Hanson, D. A.; Cilek, C. M.; Pandola, G. & Taxon, T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Environmental Regulatory Update Table, March/April 1992

Description: The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bi-monthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.
Date: May 1, 1992
Creator: Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T. & Salk, M.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Environmental restoration activities at the US Department of Energy's Pinellas Plant

Description: The Pinellas Plant, located in Largo, Florida, is part of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) weapons complex. GE Neutron Devices (GEND) has initiated an extremely aggressive, proactive Environmental Restoration (ER) Program at the Pinellas Plant. The ER program was started by AL to investigate environmental concerns associated with past waste management practices and procedures at DOE weapons installations. The Pinellas Plant has been involved with ER activities since the mid 1980's when the DOE's Pinellas Area Office (PAO) entered a voluntary cleanup agreement with the Florida Department of Environmental Regulation (FDER). The agreement was for the remediation of an adjacent parcel of property previously owned, and used for disposal of drums containing waste solvents and resins. Remediation issues at the Pinellas Plant are equivalent to those experienced by many private industries; for example, limited volatile organic compound (VOC) and heavy metal contamination of the surficial aquifer system and heavy metal contamination of soils. ER activities in progress are aimed toward: confining, repositioning and remedying areas of heavy metal and VOC contaminants found within the surficial aquifer system; consistency with EPA's draft Corrective Action rules which state the corrective action program will be to expedite cleanup results by requiring (taking) sensible early action to control environmental problems;'' protection of a US Department of Interior (DOI) designated national wetland; and to ensure that risk to human health and safety and to the environment posed by the plants past, present and future operations are either eliminated or reduced to acceptable, safe levels. This paper will summarize the progress made and the strategies of the Pinellas Plant ER program as well as implementation of interim remedial actions.
Date: January 1, 1991
Creator: Parker, M.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department